Posts Tagged ‘Horry Scale’

Morning shootaround — Nov. 15


VIDEO: Highlights from Friday’s NBA action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Duncan tops 25K, joins Kareem | Close doesn’t count for Sixers | The name is Harris. Joe Harris | Burke’s unlikely buzzer-beating accuracy

No. 1: Duncan tops 25K, joins Kareem — Not to detract from Tim Duncan‘s tremendous milestone evening Friday in Los Angeles, but once again the numbers crunchers and the young’uns who chronicle NBA exploits neglected a little bit of history.

When folks noted that Duncan scored the 25,000th point of his Hall of Fame-bound career and joined some elite company in San Antonio’s 93-80 victory over the Lakers, they were accurate without being exactly right. Yes, Duncan boosted himself onto the same level as the legendary Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in reaching 25,000 points, 14,000 rebounds and 2,500 blocks. But it’s not quite true that the two big men are “the only players in NBA history” to surpass those thresholds.

To put that another way: You can’t blame Wilt Chamberlain for the fact that the NBA didn’t track blocks during his career. Or, for that matter, it’s not Elvin Hayes‘ fault that the league only began toting blocks in 1973-74, in his fifth pro season.

Chamberlain absolutely swatted an average of 179 shots annually over his 14 seasons – the Dipper might have rejected that many in a month in his prime – and that’s all it would have taken for him to reach 2,500. With 31,419 points and 23,924 rebounds, Wilt established thresholds that would take Duncan a while longer to reach (even Kareem, with 17,440 boards, never really got close in rebounds despite playing 20 seasons).

As for Hayes, it seems fair to suggest he would have averaged 145 over his first five seasons, considering he averaged 195 over his next eight. That’s all the Rockets and Bullets Hall of Famer would have needed to get to 2,500 blocks, to go with his 27,313 points and 16,279 rebounds.

None of this more-proper perspective, though, should take anything away from the celebration of Duncan’s sustained excellence, as reported by the San Antonio Express-News’ Dan McCarney. Abdul-Jabbar was even in the house at Staples Center to witness it:

“Unbelievable player,” Duncan said of Abdul-Jabbar, who reacted with clear appreciation to several of Duncan’s baskets during the game. “A way better scorer than I ever was at any point. I did see him; it was great to see him. It’s fun to be in a category with someone like that.”
“It means I’ve been playing for a very long time. It’s fun to hear about, but it’s something I’ll look back at later on.”
Even at 38, with his contract set to expire this summer, that still might not be for some time given how well Duncan continues to play. He had 13 points and 11 rebounds in just 25 minutes against the Lakers, his sixth double-double in seven games to push his career total to 803. Duncan entered Friday’s game ranked third in rebounds per game at 11.5, and fifth in total rebounding percentage at 20.3.

“When you play for 48 seasons…no, the guy is unbelievable,” Manu Ginobili said. “He’s going by some legends, but he’s already a legend. He’s one of the best players to ever play. It’s not that I’m surprised. Sometimes we hear 25,000 points and say, ‘Wow,’ but it’s Tim. So it can happen.”
Said Gregg Popovich, “I told Aron Baynes, ‘It’s no big deal. If you shot as much as Tim, you’d have 25,000 too.’ “

***

No. 2: Close doesn’t count for Sixers — There’s no getting around it: 0-9 is 0-9. And if you’re an NBA fan of a certain age, that links the 2014-15 Philadelphia 76ers to the dreadful 1972-73 version, which also started the season winless through its first nine games. Finishing with an all-time worst 9-73, Philadelphia was winless through most of the rest of their games, too.

For a few fleeting moments Friday night in Houston, though, the Sixers looked to be on the verge of a W that didn’t stand for woeful. They led 87-86 with less than 20 seconds left, only to see second-year guard Michael Carter-Williams lose the ball off his leg on a drive to the basket. Rockets star James Harden shoot free for a layup at the other end and a rare Philadelphia game that featured 16 lead changes and 16 ties ended like the other eight before it this fall.

Keith Pompey of the Philadelphia Inquirer had more:

This is the same Sixers team that was outscored by a combined 85 points in their previous two contests against the Dallas Mavericks (53 points on Thursday) and Toronto Raptors (32 on Sunday).
“Obviously, the win is the thing that we didn’t get and what hurts most,” Sixers coach Brett Brown said. “I think [the outcome] is a fantastic reflection of what they can be. It’s a sign of not feeling sorry for ourselves, and them coming back with fight.
“Those are the things you sort of leave the game with.”

***

No. 3:The name is Harris. Joe Harris — Unheralded is one thing, disrespected is something entirely different.

You can be excused if you never heard of Joe Harris before Friday night because the 6-foot-6 swingman from the University of Virginia was a second-rounder in the Draft in June, the 33rd player picked overall, after averaging 12.6 points in four college seasons. He had more than the usual amount of shade thrown on him first by the clamor over the Cleveland Cavaliers’ first pick, No. 1 phenom Andrew Wiggins, and subsequently by LeBron James‘ return to his home market and the Cavs’ trade for All-Star forward Kevin Love.

Harris’ rookie experience took a significant turn Friday in Boston, however, with his contributions to Cleveland’s comeback victory over the Celtics. He scored six points, played 19 minutes and was good for a plus-24 on a night when the other three subs who played – Tristan Thompson (minus-9), Mike Miller (minus-15) and Dion Waiters (minus-14) – all were in the red.

The night started out with some all-too-familiar dismissiveness directed toward Harris:

But by the end, there were raves about Harris afterward from both inside and outside the locker room, as enumerated by Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal in his usual postgame countdown:

1. With the way he is progressing and as well as he is playing, Joe Harris will be the starting shooting guard sooner rather than later. Much sooner. As in within a couple of weeks (or less), one source with knowledge of the team’s thinking said. At least one member of the Cavs’ brain trust is already in favor of the switch.

2. It was the rookie second-round pick – not Dion Waiters or Mike Miller – playing the final six minutes of Friday’s tight game. The Cavs closed the night with Kyrie Irving and Harris in the backcourt, Shawn Marion and LeBron James in the frontcourt and Kevin Love at center. That’s a lineup they could use more and more going forward.

3. Harris plays with high energy. He defends, he keeps the ball moving, he cuts hard to the basket. He does everything the Cavs need him to do, including knocking down open shots. He is a great fit with this starting lineup because he doesn’t need the ball, but he’s more than capable of knocking down open shots.

4. “Joe Harris is going to be a big piece for our team,” James said. “He’s going to have his rookie mistakes, we know that, but mistakes can be covered when you play hard. That’s one thing that kid is doing.”

5. According to the Cavs’ stats, he shot 57 percent on corner 3-pointers one year at Virginia. That shot will be available to him all night on this team, just like the huge corner 3 he made in the closing minutes Friday to pull the Cavs within 116-113.

***

No. 4: Burke’s unlikely buzzer-beating accuracy — This season already has produced its early share dramatic, game-winning buzzer beaters (GWBB) that we at Hang Time HQ like to rate according to our Horry Scale. That’s named, fittingly, after the much-journeyed NBA role player who won himself and his teams a total of seven championship rings, building his brand as an amazingly clutch shooter with a flair for postseason dramatics.

We warehouse them over in the All Ball Blog, and the latest one came Friday night from Utah’s Trey Burke, an unlikely source given his 30.7 field-goal percentage prior to the game. Our man Lang Whitaker rated Burke’s GWBB on the Horry Scale, and here’s a glimpse at the Difficulty section. Go check it out in full to see how it ranked in Game Situation, Importance and Celebration:

With 2.3 seconds left on the clock, the Jazz didn’t have to rely on a catch-and-shoot. Two-plus seconds is enough time for at least a dribble, maybe even a pass.

But it looked as if the play wasn’t even drawn up for Burke to get the shot. Burke began in the far corner and set a screen for Gordon Hayward, who already had 33 points on the night. Hayward popped to the top of the key and looked to receive a pass. But Knicks forward Quincy Acy denied the look to Hayward, just as Burke flashed to the ball around the free throw line. Burke caught the ball, dribbled left into the corner, and fired up a fadeaway jumper over J.R. Smith, who was all over Burke and contested the shot well. But Burke cleared just enough space with a step-back move to release the jumper, and he drilled the shot as the buzzer was ringing.

Smith actually defended fine on the play — he went under three separate screens and stuck to Burke on the shot. Burke had to make a perfect play just to clear room for the shot. And Burke played it perfectly.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Pelicans needed those big beaks for all the franchise offensive records they racked up in their blowout of the Timberwolves. … J.J. Redick was scratching his head over both the Clippers’ odd layoff and their recent performances. … Rajon Rondo passed Paul Pierce on the Celtics’ all-time assists list and did it in 644 fewer games. Of course, their job descriptions have been a little different. … Eye-yi-yi: More eye trouble for Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard. He says not to worry. … And you thought it would never end – Houston’s streak of double-digit 3-point field-goal games is over. … Don’t blink: Brandon Jennings played some stalwart defense in Detroit’s overtime victory over OKC.

 

Another Look: Buzzer Beaters!

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Four game-changing buzzer beaters in one night deserves more than a passing mention.

It deserves further study, video and otherwise.

Thankfully, my brother-in-blog, Micah Hart of the All Ball Blog and the superproducer of the Hang Time Podcast, has come up with an interesting way to continue our study of said shots.

Much like the Doppler Radar in a storm, the Horry Scale needs to be consulted at times like this.

You owe it to yourself to weigh in!