Posts Tagged ‘Grizzlies’

Report: Gasol agrees to deal with Grizzlies


VIDEO: Marc Gasol and the Grizzlies will continue their grit and grind ride together

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Marc Gasol was never going anywhere and the Memphis Grizzlies’ All-Star free agent center confirmed as much today by agreeing to terms on a five-year, $100 million deal to stay with the Grizzlies, according to a report from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports.

Gasol didn’t even entertain overtures from other teams in free agency, opting instead to deal only with the Grizzlies. The centerpiece of a tea that has been one of the best in the Western Conference the past three seasons.

More details on the reported deal from Yahoo!:

The deal includes an early-termination option after the fourth year in 2018-19, league sources said.

Gasol met with Grizzlies owner Robert Pera in Spain last Wednesday, and progressed toward a final agreement over the next several days, sources said.

Gasol, 30, never seriously considered leaving the Grizzlies. He attended high school in Memphis while his older brother, Pau, played for the Grizzlies, and has spent all seven seasons of his NBA career with the Grizzlies.

Gasol developed into one of the league’s best centers during his previous four-year, $58 million contract. He averaged a career-high 17.4 points with 7.8 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 81 games this past season.

 

Oh, brother: Harrisons go head-to-head


VIDEO: Aaron and Andrew Harrison weigh in on their Summer League matchup

ORLANDO — For Venus and Serena Williams, sibling rivalry is becoming old hat. They’ll square off again in the Round of 16 at Wimbledon.

But going head-to-head rather than side-by-side is all new to Andrew and Aaron Harrison. The rookie twins were in different colored jerseys on Sunday when Andrew’s Grizzlies beat Aaron’s Hornets 79-75 in the Orlando Pro Summer League.

“Besides the combine, I don’t think we ever have done it before, to be honest with you,” said Andrew, who shot 3-for-8 to score nine points, grabbed six rebounds and dealt two assists. “We are used to supporting each other, pulling for each other and we’re still doing that. But you know, you want to win and I did.”

It seems brothers are all the rage in the NBA these days. From Markieff and Marcus Morris to Goran and Zoran Dragic to Myles and Mason Plumlee to Tyler and Cody Zeller to Jrue and Justin Holiday, you almost couldn’t turn around in the league last season and not bump into a pair off the same family tree.

Now come the Harrisons, who starred together at Travis High in Richmond, Texas, and spent two years in the lineup at the University of Kentucky before entering the 2015 draft. Andrew was the 44th pick by the Suns and immediately traded to Memphis. Aaron was undrafted and signed on to join Charlotte in the Summer League.

Aaron had 16 points, eight assists, four rebounds and three turnovers for the Hornets, who trailed by 17 points going into the fourth quarter, but rallied to make a game of it down the stretch.

Winning the head-to-head matchup wasn’t enough for Aaron.

“I would have rather got the win,” he said. “It was pretty different, just playing against a guy you’ve been playing with your whole life. It was pretty fun, actually.”

The brothers only guarded each other occasionally off switches on defense. In a reversal of their roles at Kentucky, Aaron was the point guard for Charlotte while Andrew was on the wing for Memphis.

“It’s just tough growing with somebody and wanting to see them do so well, but having to play against them yourself and compete against them, it’s just tough to explain,” Andrew said.

“I’m playing a new position and trying to get comfortable. Whatever coach tells me to do, I’m going to try to do it. There really wasn’t much time out there today to keep track of what the other one was doing.”

Once in the second quarter, Aaron went around the wing and tried to put up a lefty banker, but Andrew fouled him to send him to the line.

During the late comeback when the Hornets went on a 17-0 run to cut Memphis’ lead down to two points, Aaron slipped through a crack in the Grizzlies defense and went by Andrew for a layup. He scored eight of his points in the fourth quarter.

“No, there won’t be any talking or rubbing things in on each other,” Aaron said. “We’re not like that. We did a little trash talking out there on the court. Just a little. Just fun stuff. Like when he held me at the end of the game and should have been called for an intentional foul.

“But we’ll never get on each other in a mean way or a cheap way. We’re brothers.”

The Harrisons are not just making the adjustment from being separated, but also to the moving up to the NBA level where they have to prove themselves all over again.

“We both have chips on our shoulders,” Andrew said. “We both want to be one of the best players in the league. So we’re pushing each other, but at the same time we’re not together. So we have to be self-motivated. And we’re just praying for each other, and hoping for each other the best.”

Morning Shootaround — May 15


VIDEO: Daily Zap for Thursday’s playoff games

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Rockets say they are ready to go all the way | LeBron an underdog … never | Pierce’s bravado versus Horford’s grit | Warriors get defensive to turn series around

No. 1: Rockets say they are ready to go all the way — An epic comeback is one thing. But what the Houston Rockets played and lived through last night in Los Angeles was something bigger, at least that’s what it felt like on the inside (from the 2:29 mark of the third quarter until the end it was the Josh Smith, Dwight Howard and the rest of the crew’s show minus James Harden). Rallying from that monstrous deficit and staving off elimination in the conference semifinals was just the first step to much, much bigger things, according to Corey Brewer. Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle witnessed the madness:

As the Rockets took off, the Clippers crumbled. They missed 15-consecutive fourth-quarter shots, many coming at the rim or on rushed, but open jumpers. They made just 4 of 22 shots in the fourth quarter with Chris Paul tacking on a 3 at the buzzer as the teams headed to the locker rooms.

“They outplayed us in every sense of the word down the stretch,” Blake Griffin said. “We took our foot off the gas, stopped defending, a lot of things. Got to be better.
“You could tell we kind of got stunned, and we didn’t respond well.”

When the Clippers were rolling, Griffin had put the exclamation point on their run with a 360-degree spin in the air on a layup. He was 12 of 15 for 28 points after three quarters, then missed all five of his fourth-quarter shots.

“There was times where it just seemed like everything was going their way,” Howard said. “Blake hit 360, 180, I don’t know what it was, and I said, ‘Man, this is crazy.’ But we pulled together, we just kept saying we’re not going to quit, we’re not going to give up, we done come too far just to end it like this, and we just kept fighting.

“Josh hit some big shots. Everybody played great tonight, and we never quit. That’s why we got the win tonight. We kept believing, no matter how tough it got out there, because there was some rough times out there. As a team, we never gave up on each other.

The Clippers did not give up. There was not time for that. But they did break down, missing the sort of shots that had built the lead and led to the blowouts over the weekend.

“You know, I thought we were trying to run the clock out, and we stopped playing,” Clipper coach Doc Rivers said. “They kept playing, and then once it got to eight, you could just feel it.

“I don’t think they thought that they had the game in the bag. I thought they thought, we walk the ball up the floor. I thought we got very tentative offensively, very few people even wanted to shoot in stretches, and you know, it happens. But it’s awful to watch. It’s awful for our team, and we have to figure out in the next 48 hours how to get them back, because we can’t get this one back. We gave this one away. There’s no doubt about that.”

Whether the Clippers gave it away, the Rockets took it or some combination of both, the teams head to Sunday’s Game 7 rolling in opposite directions. As Game 6 demonstrated, that does not mean much.

“I played in a lot of games in my life and you can get the vibe of games and think you have the chance to win,” Brewer said. “Like Trevor (Ariza) said at the beginning of the fourth – he said we are going to win a championship, but we have to win this game first.

“If we win this game right now, that’s how you become a champion.”

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Hang Time Podcast (Episode 201) Survive And Advance

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Survive and advance.

That is the phrase all of the teams still alive in the NBA playoffs should have plastered on those shirts splashed across the seats in the arena on game day.

Survive and advance. It’s what the best of the best do on the rugged road that leads to The Finals.

Derrick Rose, Paul Pierce and LeBron James — buzzer-beater heroes for their respective teams over a wild playoff weekend — know exactly what we’re talking about on Episode 201 of The Hang Time Podcast: Survive and Advance.

It’s the same attitude James Harden must have if the KIA MVP runner-up wants his season to continue beyond tonight’s Game 5 showdown against the Los Angeles Clippers. The same attitude KIA MVP Stephen Curry showed in the Golden State Warriors’ season-saving Game 4 win in Memphis against a Grizzlies team that had Curry and his screw on the edge heading into that pivotal tilt.

The aesthetics are meaningless at this stage of the season.

No one really cares if you win big or win in style.

The only thing that matters is that you survive and advance to the next round.

Tune in to see who we think will accomplish that goal on Episode 201 of The Hang Time Podcast: Survive And Advance

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business, Andrew Merriman.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: Three buzzer-beaters to end three consecutive Eastern Conference semifinal games highlighted a wild playoff weekend

Did MVP excitement hurt the Warriors?

OAKLAND — There was the game Sunday afternoon, the announcement Monday morning that Stephen Curry won the MVP race, the press inference Monday afternoon with every Warriors player and coach in attendance, more MVP questions at shootaround Tuesday afternoon and again pre-game Tuesday night and a repeat trophy presentation just before tipoff, this time with commissioner Adam Silver.

And then the Warriors had to be ready for a playoff game.

They lost to the Grizzlies 97-90 while not only being outplayed but while looking disjointed with 20 turnovers. Curry made just seven of 19 shots, including two of 11 three-pointers. Some coincidence.

“It was weird,” Curry said. “That is the best way I can put it. It’s obviously my first time experiencing (it), as well as for my teammates. You want to stay in the moment and kind of stay focused on what the task is during the game. But obviously with the extracurricular stuff with the MVP and all of that, the celebration, and just change of routine to lead up to a game, it’s different. I don’t know if that’s a huge reason why we lost or not. But I think when we started the game, we felt like, oh, we’re ready to go. But it has been a long 48 hours. A lot of words, a lot of pictures, a lot of celebrating the accomplishment. Obviously, we didn’t get it done tonight, but we’ll be able to bounce back. I think the rest of the next three days will be huge to kind of rejuvenate ourselves and understand what we need to do to get a win in Memphis and try to make it happen.”

Coach Steve Kerr wasn’t buying it — “I don’t think so,” he replied when asked whether the MVP celebrations were a factor. “It shouldn’t be. But historically in this league you see this kind of stuff once in a while. But it shouldn’t matter.  You can’t do anything about it. You just have to go play. And I didn’t think it affected us, but, I mean, what affected us really was Memphis outplaying us.” His players, though, or at least the player at the center of attention, were clearly feeling the distraction.

Coincidence or not, the Warriors looked unusually out of sync in losing Game 2, beyond being outplayed by an opponent that handled the emotions of the playoffs much better. Memphis was looking at the possibility of an 0-2 deficit that almost certainly would have spelled eventual elimination considering the opponent, got a surge with the return of Mike Conley, and yet it was the Grizzlies who played with control.

“Yeah, I thought we lost our poise tonight,” Kerr said after the Warriors lost at home for the first time since Jan. 27 and only the third time all season. “That was the biggest issue. We were in such a rush. It’s a 48‑minute game. It takes an eternity to win an NBA game. I felt like we were in the middle of the second quarter, and it felt like desperation out there. We were too emotional.  We were too quick with our intention to score. Instead of just moving the ball and setting good screens, everyone was trying to do everything frantically on their own. I thought there was actually a pretty good stretch the middle of the second quarter where we seemed to get our bearings.

“Then the last few minutes of that second quarter we sort of lost control again, and that was the key point of the game to me. We had some open shots. We had a weird fast break that should have been a lay‑up that I think would have tied the game. Turned into a traveling call on Shaun (Livingston), which was a weird call, but that shouldn’t have mattered. We would have had a lay‑up at that point. We missed a couple of shots, and we didn’t handle our business in the last few minutes of the second quarter, and then now all of a sudden we’re scrambling again. They deserve to win. They kicked our butts.  They controlled the whole game, and we have to learn from this. We were not poised and we did not play well.”

How much of that was because of the Golden State mindset and how much was because Memphis played with greater intensity than in Game 1?

“It was both,” Kerr said. “They played a great game. Draymond (Green) picked up the two quick fouls early, which hurt us.  They scored inside. Zach (Randolph) got going, and so it was a combination. Mike Conley coming back, obviously made a big impact. (He) had a great game.  Like I said, this is the playoffs, so this is how it works, and we didn’t play well enough to win.”

Grizzlies need help beyond Conley


VIDEO: Mike Conley describes his facial injury

OAKLAND — The Grizzlies head into Game 2 against the Warriors tonight knowing the return of Mike Conley is a possibility but certain they need more help from the perimeter on offense — whether Conley returns or not.

Actually, Memphis needs offense, period, after scoring 86 points in the opener of the Western Conference semifinals on Sunday in a loss that came despite big men Marc Gasol and Zach Randolph scoring 21 and 20, respectively. The rest of the roster  combined for 45 points while making three-of-12 attempts behind the arc, prompting coach Dave Joerger to note “we’ve got to get a third scorer, especially from the perimeter to try to find a way to get Courtney Lee free to get some more looks.”

Lee is the obvious potential solution for the Grizzlies, a threat on 3-pointers who only managed three attempts in Game 1, missing two, while going four of nine from the field overall. If Conley plays, an uncertainty, and if he gets close to his regular-season level after missing three games in a row with facial fractures and subsequent surgery, he can help in that department as well.

“He’s a real pick-and-roll threat, he’s a threat in transition to go end to end,” Joerger said. “He also shoots a high percentage from three, especially as a catch-and-shoot guy…. We’re going to have to keep cutting, we’re going to have to knock down some shoots from the perimeter.”

The Grizzlies have listed Conley as questionable for tonight at Oracle Arena, an upgrade from doubtful the day before. He increased his activity at Monday’s practice and by shootaround on Tuesday was a possibility for the opening lineup. Nick Calathes had a bad showing as the Game 1 starter, leaving Joerger to consider going without a point guard for stretches. Beno Udrih is another option.

Also tonight, Golden State’s Stephen Curry, named MVP on Monday, will be presented the trophy again in a pregame ceremony.

Morning Shootaround — April 27



VIDEO: Highlights from games played April 26

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Pelicans plan to sign Davis to the max | Austin Rivers saves Clippers season | Buss says Lakers will celebrate Kobe next season | Trail Blazers vow to show heart, avoid sweep

No. 1: Report: Pelicans plan to sign Davis to the max — The New Orleans Pelicans have a summer to-do-list that starts and ends with taking care of Anthony Davis. The Pelicans’ immediate future rests on making sure Davis is a part of the organization for years to come and that means signing him to a max deal. Marc Stein of ESPN.com has more:

League sources say that the Pels will be as aggressive as possible on July 1 in presenting Davis with a five-year maximum contract that makes him New Orleans’ designated player.

Given that the 22-year-old was voted to start in February’s All-Star Game and will likely earn All-NBA first-team status when voting results are announced in coming days, Davis would be in line to start his max deal at 30 percent of the league’s salary cap as opposed to a mere 25 percent as long as he earns just one of those same honors next season — or if he is named the 2015-16 MVP.

Based on the league’s most recent cap projections, Davis will thus be presented with a five-year pact that will eventually top $30 million annually and could exceed $140 million in total value in a deal that kicks in beginning in 2016-17 and run through his 28th birthday.

Can he really turn down those sort of riches and that level of security in the name of flexibility?

Would he turn that down when he’s clearly comfortable in New Orleans and, by all accounts, highly engaged as the young leader of his team?

Hard to see Davis resisting such lucrative insulation, though he certainly does have the option of signing a shorter extension to keep his free-agent future more open.

***

No. 2: Austin Rivers saves Clippers season — He was supposed to be a bit player in this series, a footnote at best. But make no mistake, with their season on the brink in Game 4 in San Antonio, Austin Rivers stepped up and helped save the Los Angeles Clippers. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports explains how Austin Rivers brought tears to his father’s eyes:

When Doc Rivers walked into the locker room, the scene stopped him. Chris Paul called on the Clippers to congratulate the young guard responsible for saving the season and present him the game ball. Everyone clapped. Everyone let out a long, loud cheer for Austin Rivers.

“For a moment, for a half second maybe, I became a dad in there,” Doc Rivers told Yahoo Sports later on Sunday at the AT&T Center. The tears welled in his eyes, but he quickly wiped them away and stiffened in the concrete corridor.

To trade for his son, Rivers had to make a case on the move’s merits to a dubious basketball community. He’s had to live with the criticism. They’ve had to live with it together. They had Sunday together, too.

Austin Rivers had his finest moment in the NBA on Sunday, scoring 16 points, delivering defense, deflections and a 114-105 victory over the San Antonio Spurs to bring this best-of-seven series 2-2 back to Staples Center. He made deft drives to the basket, fearless finishes to stun the Spurs.

For nine years, Doc Rivers coached and lived in Boston. For most of that time, his wife and children stayed in Orlando. Austin completed middle school and high school, spent a year at Duke and moved onto the NBA. Father and son were separated a long time, often coming and going in moments Doc had flown down and stolen an off-night for a high school game or an ACC game on Tobacco Road.

“Listen, we haven’t been together a lot,” Rivers told Yahoo Sports. “In a lot of ways, I am his coach.”

More coach than father, he’s trying to say. It’s an honest admission, and it comes tinged with a touch of sadness. Nevertheless, Austin Rivers has had to find his own way with these Clippers, earn his own respect. This was a beginning on Sunday, nothing more, nothing less.

***

No. 3: Buss says Lakers will celebrate Kobe next season — It’s all about Kobe Bryant next season for the Los Angeles Lakers. Even with a monster free agent summer on tap, the Lakers’ focus will be on Kobe. Lakers boss Jeanie Buss insists the 2015-16 season will be a celebration of one of the franchise’s and NBA’s all-time greats and his 20 years with the franchise. Sean Highkin of ProBasketballTalk.com has the details:

It’s been more or less known without anybody outright saying it for a while that next year will be Kobe Bryant‘s final year. His contract is up in 2016, which will put his career at 20 seasons, all with the Lakers, and the last three have ended with injuries.

Lakers president Jeanie Buss seems to know the end of the Kobe era is coming, if you go by her comments on a Sunday morning Bleacher Report radio interview:

Bryant has said that he doesn’t want a Derek Jeter-style farewell tour when he hangs it up, but it seems pretty obvious that it’s coming. And for the impact he’s had on the NBA and the sport worldwide, he deserves to take a victory lap regardless of what the Lakers do next season.

***

No. 4: Trail Blazers vow to show heart, avoid sweep — The Portland Trail Blazers insist they will not go away quietly. They will not be swept out of these playoffs without a fight. Their season is on the line tonight against the Memphis Grizzlies and they vow to fight until the very end. Joe Freeman of The Oregonian explains:

A little more than nine weeks ago, the Trail Blazers‘ practice court was brimming with confidence and gusto.

They had just made a splash at the NBA trade deadline, acquiring Arron Afflalo to strengthen their bench and add depth for what figured to be a long and successful playoff run. Pundits universally lauded the move. San Antonio Spurs Gregg Popovich hailed it as a “great addition.” The Blazers boldly pronounced they were poised to contend for an NBA Championship.

Oh how things have changed.

On Sunday afternoon, that confidence and gusto had been replaced with disappointment and dejection. The Memphis Grizzlies have pummeled the Blazers in their best-of-seven Western Conference playoffs series, using muscle, moxie and better talent to build a 3-0 lead. No team in NBA history has overcome a 3-0 deficit to win a playoff series.

And that history hovered over the Blazers like a thick fog Sunday at the practice facility in Tualatin, where they gathered for what could be their final practice of the season. No one said the season was done. Everyone promised to show heart and fight and claw until the final buzzer sounds at the end of Game 4, which is scheduled for 7:30 Monday night at the Moda Center.

But there was no escaping the daunting challenging in front of them. And there was no masking the inevitable gloom that comes with the reality the season is all but over.

“Right now, we’re at the point where we have to just have some heart and have some pride,” Damian Lillard said.

The Blazers spouted off the usual array of clichés, promising to take the series “one game at a time” and “only think about tomorrow’s game.” But history is impossible to ignore. And when the Cleveland Cavaliers swept the Boston Celtics on Sunday, they became the 112th team in 112 chances to win a series after building a 3-0 lead.

“You can’t think about it,” LaMarcus Aldridge said. “You just have to go game-by-game. If you try to think about, ‘Oh, we’re down 0-3 and let’s try to win the series,’ I think that’s when you think about the history. But if you just go game-by-game, just focus on getting Game 4, then anything’s possible.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Boston’s summer pursuit of Kevin Love will no doubt be complicated after the “bush league” play from Kelly Olynyk … Knocked down and out, gutsy Jae Crowder embodied toughness of Celtics this season … The Hawks are still a bit salty after their poor shooting effort in a Game 3 loss to the Brooklyn NetsSteals could help the Bucks steal another playoff win if the Chicago Bulls aren’t more careful with the ball … Kevin Love‘s absence in Cleveland with that shoulder dislocation will depend on his personal injury history

 

Grizzlies lose Conley for at least Game 4


Video: Grizzlies’ Conley will miss Game 4

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Grizzlies will be without Mike Conley for at least one game and possibly longer after the starting point guard returned to Memphis and will undergo surgery Monday to repair multiple fractures in his facial bones, according to TNT’s Lewis Johnson.

There was no immediate prognosis on how long he could be out, the team said, only that he will be missing as the Grizzlies try to close out the Trail Blazers in Game 4 of the first round Monday night at Moda Center.

Beno Udrih, who did not play Saturday because of a sprained right ankle, said after practice Sunday he will play, at least providing additional depth at the position after the loss of Conley, one of the Memphis emotional leaders as well as an integral player on the court.

Asked about his level of concern heading into Game 4, Coach Dave Joerger said, “Very. He does so much for us, with the ball, with the defense, setting us up. You guys that have been around us a long time, he shoulders a huge amount of responsibility for us. Everybody else has to just pick it up, keep getting better and has to be a little more focused in every single area. Every single possession’s going to matter. We’ve done a great job keeping the turnovers down. Now, what do we do from here?”

Joerger will choose between Nick Calathes and Udrih to start Game 4 against Damian Lillard, with rookie Russ Smith also a possibility to play.

Conley was injured with about 4:10 remaining in the third quarter of Game 3 when he leaned toward Portland’s C.J. McCollum for a steal as McCollum raised his left arm to shield the defender. McCollum’s elbow appeared to crash into Conley’s left cheek or eye.

“I’m not worried about Mike,” Udrih said. “Mike is a fighter. He’ll be back in no time.”

Said center Marc Gasol: “It’s going to be a different look, but I feel like our guys are ready. I feel like our guys have confidence they put in work to be ready for this situation. I have all my confidence. … I feel bad. Of course, I want Mike to be out there because I know how competitive he is. I know how much he wants to play. But, sadly, this is a part of the game. Things happen. It’s a physical game. I just wish that he can be out there because I know how much it means to him.”

Conley still not close to full health

PORTLAND — The company line is that Mike Conley is getting better, that the minutes increase in his return to the Grizzlies’ lineup is an indication he is nearing 100 percent.

“I’m feeling better,” he said.

Conley couldn’t pull it off. He made it through one sentence before he started to smile.

“I think each game has gotten a little bit better,” Conley added.

He straight out laughed.

Playing and contributing to the 2-0 Memphis lead over the Trail Blazers as the first round shifts to Moda Center tonight, yes. Convincing, no.

“You know, I’m telling myself I’m felling better,” Conley said. “I don’t know if I’ll play 30 minutes of 25 or 22. I just go out there and play as hard as I can for as long as I can.”

He is feeling better, and Conley has gone from missing the final four games of the regular season because of a sprained right foot to 24 and then 29 minutes the first two games against Portland. That is encouraging. But closing in on his 2014-15 average of 31.8 minutes per outing is not to be confused with nearly being back to normal.

He estimates he is is about 70 percent — and getting better.

“Yeah,” Conley said. “At least I’m telling myself that.”

Meanwhile, Tony Allen, the Grizzlies’ starting small forward, has gone from missing nine games with a strained left hamstring to 25 minutes in the postseason opener to 36 minutes in Game 2 on Wednesday in Memphis. The schedule has helped — the series so far has gone Sunday-Wednesday-Saturday, with the benefit of two days rest in between games. That will also benefit the Trail Blazers with the expected return of Arron Afflalo tonight and becomes especially important for the Grizz with Beno Udrih listed as questionable.

“A little treatment last night,” Allen said. “Treatment pretty much every day. I’m taking advantage of that. I’m pretty much a work in progress.”

Morning Shootaround — April 18


VIDEO: Ahmad Rashad goes one-on-one with Steph Curry

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Pierce savoring these final playoff moments | Pelicans’ Davis eager to take next step | Clippers using Spurs blueprint to knock off champs | Kidd at center of Bucks’ turnaround

No. 1: Pierce savoring these final playoff moments — The truth is Paul Pierce knows this might be one of the last times he’s on this stage, this playoff stage. And the Washington Wizards’ veteran swingman is savoring each and every second these final playoff moments of his career. Jorge Castillo of the Washington Post provides the details:

The end is near for Paul Pierce. Next season will be his 18th and final tour as a professional basketball player, meaning scenes like the one that will unfold Saturday afternoon in Toronto, Game 1 of an NBA playoff series, are dwindling for the future Hall of Famer.

“It’s very different for me because I don’t have too many chances left in my career of playoff basketball and opportunities to try to win a championship,” Pierce said. “So I enjoy each and every moment, each and every practice, each and every game.”

Pierce, 37, will step onto the Air Canada Centre hardwood Saturday before a frenzied crowd in a Washington Wizards uniform, his third playoff appearance in three years with a third different team. He will be Raptors fans’ Public Enemy No. 1, the result of his clutch play as a Brooklyn Net against Toronto last postseason and his recent comments on the Raptors’ lack of the “It” factor, whatever “It” is.

The setting is why the Wizards hired him, to supply his famed shot-making ability, valuable experience and notorious swagger to help ascend the Wizards to another level when the stakes are highest.

“He can help on the floor. Off the floor. Around the floor,” guard Bradley Beal said. “Whatever it is related to basketball and life in general. You can basically call him the Oracle. He knows pretty much everything.”

This will be Pierce’s 12th career playoff appearance. He has crashed the tournament seven straight springs. He has been on underdogs, on favorites. He has suited up for underachievers and overachievers. He has experienced nearly every possible scenario, including both ends of regular season sweeps that were reversed in the playoffs. So he insists that the Wizards losing all three meetings with the Raptors during the regular season doesn’t concern him.

“Each team’s [0-0], so right now we’re a confident group,” Pierce said. “We feel like we can beat pretty much any team in the East.”

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