Posts Tagged ‘Golden State Warriors’

Morning shootaround — July 16


VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played July 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Hornets, Stephenson reach deal | Reports: Wolves, Warriors renew Love trade talks | Parsons clarifies comments about Houston | ‘The Greek Freak’ at point guard? | Silver: Clips sale may not happen soon

No. 1: Report: Stephenson headed to Hornets — The Charlotte Hornets opened free agency by taking a big swing at landing restricted free-agent swingman Gordon Hayward of the Jazz, but Utah matched the Hornets’ offer sheet last weekend. Swing No. 2 appears to be a success for the Hornets this time, though, as they have agreed to terms on a three-year deal with Indiana Pacers standout (and unrestricted free agent) Lance Stephenson, as first reported by Rick Bonnell of the Charlotte Observer. This marks a big loss for the Pacers — who had the best record in the East last season — but there had been talk that contract negotiations between Stephenson and Indiana had broken down of late. Bonnell has more on the move for Charlotte:

Following an all-night negotiating session, the Charlotte Hornets have come to an agreement to sign Indiana Pacers shooting guard Lance Stephenson, the Observer has learned.

Under terms of the agreement, Stephenson will make $9 million in 2014-15 and $9 million in 2015-16. Stephenson will get a slight raise in 2016-17 if the Hornets pick up the team option.

Stephenson fills an obvious need, as the Hornets were weak offensively at the shooting guard and small forward positions. The 6-foot-5 Stephenson had a breakthrough season statistically, averaging 13.8 points, 7.2 rebounds and 4.7 assists. He also shot 49 percent from the field and 35 percent from 3-point range.

However, he has a quirky personality that seems to have limited his market when he became an unrestricted free agent July 1.

The Pacers had offered Stephenson $44 million over five seasons, and reportedly did not come off that number. Stephenson thought he was worth considerably more.

But the question becomes how Stephenson’s quirkiness might play out once he signs a lucrative contract extension. He famously blew in opponent LeBron James’ ear in the playoffs. He was fined for flopping this season and was charged with 14 technical fouls, fourth-most in the NBA.

It is not the Hornets’ habit to take frequent risks on high-maintenance players. Trading for Stephen Jackson worked out for two seasons before they traded him on to the Milwaukee Bucks. Now they have drafted P.J. Hairston, a player who lost his NCAA eligibility over improper benefits and who recently was cited for punching a teenager during a pickup game at a Durham YMCA.

Hornets owner Michael Jordan has said one of his team’s greatest strengths last season was the character of the players on the roster. Did that embolden the front office to pursue Stepehenson? Is Stephenson now a threat to that chemistry?

Certainly the Hornets faced competitive pressure in the Eastern Conference. The Cleveland Cavaliers improved dramatically with the addition of James, so that’s a non-playoff team in the East that now looks like a post-season lock. While the Heat lost James, they weakened the Hornets with the signing of Josh McRoberts.

It’s possible the Hornets would have struggled just to make the playoffs this season without upgrading the roster with a move like Stephenson.

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Morning Shootaround — July 2



VIDEO: GameTime’s crew discusses where Kyle Lowry and other top point guards may land

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Rockets, Mavs ready their pitches for Anthony | Report: Rose works out for Anthony | Plenty of big names linked to Heat | Livingston gets his payday | Report: Lakers, Gasol have long chat

No. 1: Rockets prep for their ‘Melo pitch, Mavs do too — Stop No. 2 (and 3) on the Carmelo Anthony Wooing Tour heads to Texas today as the Rockets and Mavericks will make their respective bids for the seven-time All-Star. Neither will be holding back anything, writes Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle, what with Dwight Howard and James Harden on hand to greet ‘Melo — plus some other bells and whistles, too — in Houston.

UPDATE, 2:22 p.m. ET: The Rockets have begun their wooing of ‘Melo …

As for the stop in Dallas, the Mavs have a five-pronged pitch for Anthony, writes Tim McMahon of ESPNDallas.com:

The Rockets did not wait to make their presentation to Knicks free agent forward Carmelo Anthony to get busy with players and their agents, starting with their late-night reunion with former Rockets point guard Kyle Lowry in Philadelphia.

The focus, however, entirely shifts to Anthony, scheduled to be at Toyota Center on Wednesday for the second stop of his tour of suitors.

Anthony spent his first day of free agency with the Bulls and will go from his session with the Rockets’ welcoming committee to a meeting Wednesday afternoon with the Mavericks in Dallas. He will also meet with the Lakers this week in Los Angeles and the Knicks can come in with an offer that no other team can approach.

The Rockets, however, have confidence in their message and presentation, combining the successful pitch to Dwight Howard last summer with the $7 million worth of new facilities stuffed assorted state-of-the-art bells and whistles that have been geared to put on a show.

The Rockets will have Howard and James Harden in on the presentation and will make Anthony the first free agent to tour the new basketball operation and training facilities, which were completed after free agency recruiting had ended last season.

When Anthony arrives in the lockerroom, in addition to the show on the video boards that circle the locker room, there will be a life-sized poster of Anthony in a Rockets’ uniform holding the championship trophy. The book the Rockets annually provide (and also have prepared for LeBron James and Chris Bosh, if need be) features Anthony on the cover, also with the trophy, and featured throughout along with information about living in Houston geared toward him.

As with last season’s pitch to Howard, the bulk of the presentation will focus on the Rockets contention that with Anthony, they would be ready to contend.

The Rockets began free agency recruiting with general manager Daryl Morey and coach Kevin McHale catching up with their former point guard in Philadelphia as soon as free agency began early Tuesday.

McHale called former Rockets forward/center Jordan Hill shortly after midnight and Morey followed up with his agent Tuesday afternoon. Discussions were considered preliminary, but the Rockets indicating strong interest in bringing Hill back with an offer expected shortly after the Rockets meeting with Anthony.

And here’s McMahon on the Mavs’ approach to recruiting Anthony today:

There will surely be some bells and whistles during Carmelo Anthony’s visit with the Dallas Mavericks, such as entertainment elements and marketing plans.

You can count on money coming up in the conversation, too, with that discussion centering on just how close Mark Cuban can come to a max-contract offer.

1. Play for an elite coach: Carlisle joins Gregg Popovich, Erik Spoelstra and Doc Rivers as the only active NBA championship coaches, and he has outwitted two of those men in recent playoff series.

2. Play with a selfless star: Nowitzki is not only willing to hand the keys to the franchise over to a capable superstar, he’s taking a massive pay cut in an effort to help make it happen. He might even accept a lower salary than anticipated if that’s what it takes to make Melo a Mav.

3. A quality supporting cast: The Mavs believe the trade for defensive anchor Tyson Chandler gave them a legitimate chance of landing Anthony. They can now make the case that adding Anthony would give Dallas the league’s best frontcourt.

4. A proven front office and culture of winning: When it comes to stability and sustained success among front offices in today’s NBA, only the Spurs trump the Mavs.

5. A plan for the future: Would Anthony be left as Dallas’ lone star when Nowitzki stops shooting one-legged fadeaways and starts spending days in a rocking chair? Not if the front office executes its plan.


VIDEO: What will Houston bring to the table when Carmelo Anthony visits?

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Aldridge: Livingston’s new deal a ‘long time coming’


VIDEO: Rachel Nichols talks with Shaun Livingston about his long NBA path

Seven years after suffering one of the most gruesome knee injuries in the history of the NBA, Shaun Livingston is almost — almost — all the way back.

Livingston, who resurrected his career with the Brooklyn Nets last season, agreed to a three-year, $16 million deal with the Golden State Warriors on Tuesday that can’t be officially signed until after the league moratorium ends July 10. In Golden State, he’ll back up both Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson for new Warriors coach Steve Kerr.

After tearing just about everything in his left knee and dislocating his kneecap while playing for the Clippers in 2007, Livingston spent the next six years rehabbing, playing for six teams as his game slowly came back to life. Last season in Brooklyn, he was supposed to play a limited role for the Nets. But he wound up playing 26 minutes a night, and starting 54 games. And he started to get back some of the explosiveness he’d lost all those years ago, combining it with the cerebral part of the game he always possessed.

“Long time coming,” Livingston said Tuesday night by phone.

He was immediately drawn to Golden State. He grew up down the way from Andre Iguodala in Springfield, Ill., and played with Warriors center Andrew Bogut when both were in Milwaukee. He also knew he’d be joining a Warriors team that made the playoffs two years straight under former coach Mark Jackson.

“It feels good to be kind of a priority on a winning team,” he said. “It was the same feeling last year with Brooklyn. I was excited about the opportunity. … Out here, I can kind of be rewarded for my play last year, which is rewarding [in itself].

“It’s a great feeling. And I really wanted to be competitive. Being in the playoffs last year, being in a competitive situation, that’s what I’m all about. But this is my road, and my struggle. With all my issues, to have this now, it’s great.”

Livingston said the bizarre departure of Jason Kidd, a strong backer of his, as coach of the Nets over the weekend was not a major factor in his decision to go to Golden State. A bigger issue was the contractual limitation Brooklyn had because of its enormous team salary last season. The only way the Nets could re-sign Livingston was to use the taxpayer mid-level exception, which starts at just more than $3 million for next season.

By contrast, Golden State had the non-taxpayer mid-level exception, starting at $5.3 million next season, to use for Livingston.

“I don’t know if [Kidd’s departure] would have played a factor, because I don’t know that the contract situation would have worked out,” Livingston said. “But Jason’s situation didn’t help matters.”

Report: Livingston, Warriors agree on deal

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Veteran point guard Shaun Livingston has reached an agreement to join the Golden State Warriors, according to Yahoo! Sports.

Livingston’s deal, for three years and a reported $16 million (with the third year partially guaranteed, per USA Today Sports), gives the Warriors a new dimension and some security in the backcourt

Livingston’s addition will allow All-Star point guard Steph Curry to play off the ball and alleviate some of the ball-handling and facilitating duties he shouldered last season. The Warriors will be adjusting to new coach Steve Kerr‘s system anyway, but the addition of a season veteran like Livingston gives them all sorts of possibilities in the backcourt.

Morning Shootaround — June 17


VIDEO: Kenny Smith gives his thoughts on the 2014 Finals and the next season

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Kerr gets to know Bogut, Barnes | Pelicans’ Gordon on the mend | Bryant responds to Klinnsman’s comments | Wiggins’ visit to Philly mostly a secret

No. 1: Kerr gets jump on getting to know his playersSteve Kerr has been only been in his new role as coach of the Golden State Warriors a few weeks, but that hasn’t stopped him from getting to know his players. He recently took a trip to Melbourne, Austrailia, to visit center Andrew Bogut and spoke with second-year forward Harrison Barnes and his agent in the Miami area, writes 

New Warriors coach Steve Kerr went out of his way to meet with his players in person. To get to center Andrew Bogut, he flew to Melbourne.

“It showed a lot of respect to come here and see me,” Bogut told The Daily Telegraph on Monday.

“He had some good things to say about the direction of the team and what he wants to do. I’m really excited about Steve.

“The question is that he hasn’t coached before but the way he spoke to me when he was here it seemed like he knew what he was doing.”

Kerr also recently traveled to the Miami area to visit with Harrison Barnes and his agent.

“Steve felt that it would be a great thing for him to do to meet every single player — go to them, not have them come to him — and spend time with them, get to know ‘em, tell ‘em about what his plans were and how they fit in, and also see how badly they wanted to be a part of it as well,” Warriors co-owner Joe Lacob told KGO-TV on Sunday.

“I think the reception has been fantastic, and I think that over time — this is a process — that they’ll get to know him and understand the system he’s bringing in and what we’re going to do going forward. And I think by training camp, we’ll have a group of guys that are all on the same page.”


VIDEO: Take an All-Access look at Steve Kerr’s official arrival in Oakland

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Challenges await Knicks’ coach Fisher

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Fisher introduced as coach of Knicks

Veteran coaches George Karl and Lionel Hollins are still knocking on doors. Longtime assistant and former New York Knicks great Patrick Ewing still can’t get a sniff for a head coaching job even as 19 of the league’s 30 teams decided to hire new coaches since the end of last season.

Including Ewing’s old Knicks with their new president with the famous limp and all that bling.

Phil Jackson wanted to keep his coaching search within his Triangle-of-trust, so to speak, so once former top choice and former Chicago Bulls sharpshooter Steve Kerr spurned him to take the Golden State Warriors’ gig, Jackson tapped the next man up, freshly retired Derek Fisher. The former Los Angeles Lakers point guard put a wrap on a distinguished 18-year career following the Oklahoma City Thunder’s loss in the Western Conference finals just 11 days ago.

On Tuesday, the dapperly dressed Fisher was introduced as the 26th coach of the New York Knicks. Jackson, and Knicks owner James Dolan, awarded him a five-year, $25-million contract to breath some blue-collar life into a high-ego and seemingly incongruent, salary-cap-strapped roster.

Fisher, although, promptly pointed out, as any smart coach would, that he’s more optimistic about the immediate potential of his new team than are most observers.

“I’m not as down on the roster and the team as some of you in the room are,” Fisher said, smiling at reporters gathered at Madison Square Garden.

Fisher has always been something of a political animal.


VIDEO: Fisher talks about his experience

He was also the perfect set-up man and emotional stabilizer to play next to the Lakers’ high-strung star. Fisher was a steady, level-headed and intelligent quarterback who didn’t need to score to be satisfied, but was always ready to take the big shot. He made plenty of them along the road to five Lakers championships with Kobe and Phil.

Fisher, 39, never was the natural talent or showman like Jason Kidd, his now-crosstown coaching rival in Brooklyn who preceded Fisher by one year in making the rare move of stepping out of the locker room and into the coach’s chair.

But like Kidd, Fisher enjoyed a long career as a successful floor general and garners a high level of respect from the league’s players. With Oklahoma City for parts of the last three seasons, Fisher gained the trust and admiration of the Thunder’s front office and coach Scott Brooks, and served as a hybrid assistant coach-mentor-sounding board for the team’s two young stars, Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook.

“He’s well-respected in the locker room, knows the game of basketball, great basketball mind and he’s been in situations before,” Durant said during the Thunder’s exit interviews. “Having those guys that respect you and you have that experience, it helps. He’s a great leader, a great communicator … he works extremely hard and he’s dedicated.”

Jackson’s belief is that Fisher will forge a similar relationship with currently discontented Knicks star Carmelo Anthony, assuming he re-signs.

Even if Anthony stays, Fisher’s new job is going to be tough. The roster, despite Fisher’s early protestation, is in tatters. The Knicks do not have a first-round draft pick and because the team’s 2014-15 payroll is already pushing well into the luxury tax, Jackson’s hands are mostly tied to make impactful changes this summer.

It makes Fisher’s situation more dire than the one Kidd inherited after he retired from the Knicks following the 2012-13 season and surprisingly stepped into the Nets’ top job. Kidd took over a better roster, buttressed by former Celtics greats Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, and one essentially free of troublemakers. Although the season started shakily with Kidd absorbing heavy criticism, even though early injuries played a significant role, Kidd eventually found his footing and the Nets finished the season strongly, advancing to the second round.

Fisher got a taste of wait awaits before he even woke up this morning. Eccentric shooting guard J.R. Smith proclaimed on Twitter in the early morning hours that he’s done with his sixth-man role:

Perhaps Jackson is taking a big risk by hiring a man with no coaching experience to handle this job. Jackson said he’s betting on Fisher’s experiences playing with this generation’s players, calling Fisher “hip-hop-ready.”

And even the most accomplished coaches, such as Karl, would have a devil of a time flipping these Knicks back into the 54-win team they were just a season ago. With Fisher, Jackson at least knows he’ll always have his ear and will always be on the same page. Jackson can guide Fisher’s entrance into the profession as a firm rudder and in shaping the style the Knicks will bring to the Garden floor.

Then it becomes about Jackson earning his $60 million and crafting a roster of players that can execute the game plan — and stealing Durant as a free agent in 2016 shouldn’t be Plan A, at least not yet. The cold, hard truth is this rebuild is going to take time and patience.

“He always tries to tell you and let you know what’s right,” the Thunder’s Westbrook said of Fisher. “It may not be what you want to hear all the time, but what’s right is what’s right.”

Words Fisher will want to continue to live by as a rookie head coach making the leap onto a very big stage.


VIDEO: Jackson, Mills talk about Fisher’s qualities

Morning Shootaround — May 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No Serge means Spurs surge| Lowball start cost Knicks | Wizards look to keep, lure | Watson gets in front of Jazz job

No. 1: No Serge means Spurs surge — Friday was a bad day if you were an NBA fan in general and a horrible day if you were partial to the Oklahoma City Thunder in particular. A night without playoff games – the last two conference semifinal rounds wrapped up Thursday – was bad enough for most folks. But for OKC fans, the news that power forward Serge Ibaka was done for the postseason with a Grade 2 left calf strain was a slo-mo, long-lasting gut punch. On the other hand, San Antonio couldn’t, in good form, revel in Ibaka’s discomfort and the Thunder’s misfortune. But a break’s a break, even when it’s a strain, as Jeff McDonald wrote in the San Antonio Express-News:

Nobody in San Antonio need mention Ibaka’s value as a pressure valve alongside league MVP Kevin Durant and Westbrook in the OKC offense. In Game 4 of the 2012 conference finals against the Spurs, Ibaka went 11 for 11 on his way to 26 points.

“Every time I see Ibaka or hear the name, 11 for 11 goes through my head,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said Friday, about four hours before the extent of Ibaka’s injury was made public.

Ibaka has provided needed offense against the Spurs while anchoring the OKC defense. In the past two seasons, his plus/minus ratings against San Antonio has leaped into the black. Here are his basic stats vs. the Spurs over the past four years:

2013-14: 14.0, 11.5, plus-9.8
2012-13: 13.3, 13.3, plus-12.4
2011-12: 10.7, 7.3, minus-10.0
2010-11: 12.3, 11.0, minus-12.4

Defensively is where Ibaka’s loss, however, will have its greatest impact. Matthew Tynan of the 48 Minutes Of Hell blog broke down some of those numbers:

In the 148 minutes the OKC shot-blocking terror has been on the floor against the Spurs this season, San Antonio managed to shoot a putrid 42.3 percent from the floor with a true-shooting mark of 49.3, nearly 8 percent worse than its regular-season average. Near the rim, where Ibaka’s presence is most noticeable, the splits are even more dramatic. The Spurs shot 48 percent at the rim when he was on the floor during the teams’ four games against one another; when he was off, that number ballooned to 61.9 percent.
Even more startling are the 3-point numbers. Ibaka’s ability to singlehandedly protect the paint allows perimeter defenders to stick with shooters, scramble aggressively and close out hard when the Spurs kick the ball out to the arc. San Antonio shot 33 percent from deep when he was on the floor against them this season; when he was off, the NBA’s top 3-point shooting team launched away at better than 54 percent.

And:

Get this: San Antonio managed only 93 points per 100 possessions in Ibaka’s shadow this season, compared to a staggering 120.8 offensive-efficiency rating in the 48 minutes his butt was on the bench*. This news isn’t Durant- or Westbrook-level devastating for OKC, but it’s damn close. He’s been so incredibly important for that team against the Spurs this season, and his absence will greatly swing the forecast of this series.

***

No. 2: Lowball start cost Knicks — Apparently, the annual salary was set: $4.4 million. The question was, over how many years? That’s where the New York Knicks allegedly bungled negotiations with Steve Kerr, their No. 1 coaching candidate who wound up agreeing to a deal with the Golden State Warriors instead.
Marc Berman, who covers the Knicks for the New York Post, related the tale of dickering gone awry:

The Post has learned [Phil] Jackson’s initial offer to Kerr was a lowball of three years, $13.2 million. That offer stuck for more than a week before the Warriors got involved Tuesday. Kerr wound up agreeing to terms with Golden State on a five-year, $22 million contract — not the $25 million that was widely reported.
Had the Knicks originally offered Kerr five years, $22 million — $4.4 million a year — he probably would have closed the deal before Golden State could reenter the fray. Jackson only bumped the offer to four years in response to Golden State’s offer.
A source said Kerr wasn’t moving across the country for less money than the Warriors were offering. The Knicks have insisted Jackson, not owner James Dolan, handled the negotiations. Kerr never spoke to Dolan during the process, meeting with general manager Steve Mills and basketball operations director Jamie Mathews.

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Morning Shootaround — May 16



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 15

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: D-Will could be traded this summer| Report: Sterling plans to sue NBA | Kerr opens up on his plans for Warriors | Report: Knicks talk with Pippen | Report: Pistons to add Thomas as minority owner

No. 1: D-Will could be dealt this summer — It was just two offseasons ago that Nets guard Deron Williams had re-signed with the team as a free agent in a move seen by many as the one that would give Brooklyn its cornerstone player for years to come. But as the Nets try to make sense of their season and their East semifinals ousting at the hands of the Miami Heat, could Williams be on the trading block this summer? That question — and others — are addressed by Bleacher Report’s Howard Beck here:

Paul Pierce could leave as a free agent, perhaps to join old friend Doc Rivers in Los Angeles. Kevin Garnett could retire, and just might if Pierce were to leave. If the two proud former Celtics walk away, then the Nets will have broken the payroll record—and given up three first-round draft picks—for nothing.

But the fixation on the price tag, and even on the trade itself, obscures the Nets’ greatest problem—­a previous, equally costly investment that has gone bust:

You remember Deron Williams?

You could be forgiven if you didn’t. Williams was a dud in the playoffs, particularly against the Heat. He scored zero points in Game 2, nine points in Game 3 and 13 points (on 5-of-14 shooting) in a Game 4 loss that pushed the Nets to the brink of elimination. Williams’ postseason field-goal percentage: 39.5.

The Nets imported Pierce and Garnett for their wisdom and their fire, but no one expected the two aging vets to carry the offense. It is Williams who was acquired to be the face of the franchise, the engine of the Nets offense, and he has utterly failed in that role.

No matter how many tens of millions they spend, no matter how many flashy trades they make, the Nets will never be a serious contender unless Williams regains his All-Star form.

“Deron’s the X-factor,” said one Nets official. “More than anybody.”

Since Williams’ celebrated arrival in 2011, the Nets have made two trips to the playoffs, one ending in the first round and one in the second, for a postseason record of 8-11.

No one player can be blamed for the lousy late-game execution, but it is the job of the point guard (and franchise player) to maintain order and to put his teammates in the best position to succeed. Time and again, Williams has shown he is incapable of leading when the pressure is at its highest. When the Nets needed salvation this season, they turned to Joe Johnson and Pierce.

This is surely not what general manager Billy King envisioned three years ago, when he plucked Williams from Utah and made him the franchise centerpiece. That Williams was then considered the equal (or at least close rival) of Chris Paul is of little comfort now, with Williams perpetually battling ankle injuries and crises of confidence.

“I used to feel like I was the best player on the court, no matter who we were playing against,” Williams told reporters Thursday, an implicit acknowledgment of his diminished status.

Team officials were encouraged by Mirza Teletovic and see promise in Mason Plumlee. The Nets also hold the rights to Bojan Bogdanovic, a European star who could either join the Nets next season or be used in a trade.

But Pierce will be 37 next fall, Garnett 38 and Johnson 33. This team has little upside unless Williams somehow rediscovers the swagger that made him a star in Utah.

There is an alternative, sources say, the Nets will not rule out: They could look to trade Williams this summer, retool around Johnson and Brook Lopez, squeeze one more run out of Pierce and Garnett and hope for the best.

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Morning Shootaround — May 15



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Spurs await word on Parker’s injury | Pierce expects to play ‘one or two years’ at most | Fisher on Knicks’ short list of coaches? | Report: Van Gundy a fan of Monroe

No. 1: Spurs wait for word on Parker’s injury — The San Antonio Spurs made quick work of the Portland Trail Blazers in the second half of Game 5 to wrap up that semifinal series and clinch a third straight trip to the West finals. As happy as Spurs fans are to see the playoff train rolling along, there’s a bit of concern this morning surrounding point guard Tony Parker. Parker left Game 5 with about 8 minutes, 45 seconds to go with a hamstring injury. Our Fran Blinebury was on the scene and points out how this injury could put a severe cramp in San Antonio’s hopes of another run to The Finals:

In a season the Spurs have spent exorcising ghosts from Miami, it could just be an eerie coincidence.Or a scary bump in the night.

Tony Parker walked tenderly off the court with 8:46 left in the second quarter and limped to the locker room, followed by the team trainer and general manager R.C. Buford.

Tightness in the left hamstring. Tightness rippling throughout Spurs Nation.

The Spurs now advance to the Western Conference finals for the 13th time in franchise history, ninth time in the Tim Duncan era and for the third season in a row. It is a testament to consistency and excellence.

Yet it will not be enough if the Spurs don’t at least get a chance to return to the NBA Finals to clean up unfinished business that left them ringless.

That’s the Parker question. That’s the haunting flashback to last June. That’s the painful reminder that one small tweak can lead to big consequences.

Long before those ugly last 28 seconds of Game 6 became a lost championship, the Spurs watched Parker limp off the court in Game 3 against Miami with tightness in his right hamstring. He came back to play the rest of the series, but he was never quite at the same crackling level. He often looked tired, worn out and was no longer explosive.

Now Parker will have an MRI on Thursday to determine the extent of any damage to his left hamstring and the Spurs will likely, for a night at least, become Clippers fans. It’s all about getting their point guard time to rest and rehab. If L.A. can win Thursday to force a Game 7 against OKC, that would push the start of the West finals back to next Wednesday, giving Parker a full week off.

“We hope for him to be back and healthy,” said Manu Ginobili. “It is too early to tell. I don’t know what’s going to happen. If we want to have a chance to make it to The Finals, we need him healthy.”

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Morning Shootaround — May 11



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 10

NEWS OF THE MORNING

NBA believes it can oust Shelly Sterling, too  | Cavs close to naming permanent GM | Amar’e endorses Steve Kerr | Warriors don’t expect to land Kerr

No. 1: NBA believes it can oust Shelly Sterling, too — Shelly Sterling, the estranged wife of Donald Sterling, has a 50 percent ownership stake in the Los Angeles Clipper and she wants to keep it, despite the NBA attempting to remove her husband from the position. However, the NBA believes they can also remove Shelly Sterling because she was never approved by the NBA Board of Governors as a controlling owner. Ramona Shelburne of ESPN.com has more on the story:

The NBA believes it has the legal grounds to oust both Shelly Sterling and her husband as owners, despite the fact that commissioner Adam Silver’s punishments were specifically leveled only against Donald, according to sources with knowledge of the league’s legal strategy.

Shelly Sterling, the estranged wife of exiled Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, has made it clear to the NBA that she intends to retain her 50 percent ownership interest in the team.

She has publicly and privately cooperated with the league in its actions to ban her husband for life and move to oust him from ownership. However, the league’s contention will be that Shelly Sterling — while entitled to a 50 percent interest in the franchise — has never been approved by the board of governors as the controlling owner. She and team president Andy Roeser, who went on an indefinite leave of absence this week, were only alternate governors.

In order to become the team’s new controlling owner, Shelly Sterling would have to be approved by the board of governors, which is unlikely given her association with her husband of 58 years.

Former Lakers great Magic Johnson said Friday that none of the current Clippers players would play for Shelly Sterling if she retains her ownership.

“Those guys are not going to play for anybody (named) Sterling,” Johnson told USA TODAY Sports and two other reporters at the Omni Dallas Hotel. “It’s just how it is. It’s hard to separate the two. … It’s going to be hard for them to sell that to the fans and definitely to the players.”

Miami Heat guard James Jones, the current secretary-treasurer of the players association, said Saturday that Shelly Sterling would not be a reasonable replacement for her husband.

“No, that’s not something that’s acceptable to us,” Jones said, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. “That’s our stance, and it hasn’t changed, and it won’t.”

Shelly Sterling’s lawyer, Pierce O’Donnell, told ESPN on Friday that his client was “trying to resolve this” amicably with the NBA, but if that wasn’t possible, “We’re going to be in the courts.”

Her position, at this time, O’Donnell said, was to maintain her 50 percent interest in the team for the rest of her life. However, she does not want to be the team’s controlling owner and would welcome “a new, dynamic management team and investors to come in.”

That leaves open the door for a compromise that could avoid a protracted legal battle, sources said.

“Court cases can be protracted. We saw what [Frank and Jamie] McCourt did with the Dodgers. We don’t want to reprise the McCourt spectacle,” O’Donnell said. “This is a great franchise. Shelly’s been a co-owner in the darkest days. And now, ‘Go Clippers!’ maybe we can bring an NBA championship to this city this year. But if she has to fight, she’ll fight. We respect property rights in America. We have due process. And she will fight to retain her interests.”

Shelly Sterling has publicly distanced herself from her estranged husband -whom she’s been separated from for the last few years — since the scandal broke two weeks ago. “Donald’s on his own,” O’Donnell said. “She’s distanced herself from him, she’s repudiated his racist statements. He has nothing to do with the team anymore, he can’t go to the games. What happens to Donald, happens to Donald. She wants to retain her interests.

“Shelly was found by commissioner Silver to be blameless. This is about Donald. Push Donald out, but don’t throw his innocent wife over the cliff.”

 

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No. 2: Cavs close to naming permanent GMDavid Griffin has served as the Cleveland Cavaliers interim general manager since February 6, when owner Dan Gilbert fired Chris Grant. It now looks like Griffin will soon be the permanent GM for Cleveland, who hold the ninth slot in the NBA Draft Lottery which will take place Tuesday, May 20. Mary Schmitt Boyer of The Cleveland Plain Dealer with more:

After Griffin took over for Grant, the team responded with a six-game winning streak — its longest since the 2009-10 season — and went 17-16 the rest of the season, remaining in the playoff hunt until the final week of the season.

One of the key factors was that less than two weeks after being named, Griffin acquired Spencer Hawes from Philadelphia at the trading deadline.

Griffin, 44, joined the Cavs as vice president of basketball operations in 2010, after Danny Ferry resigned as general manager and Grant was promoted to that position. Before joining the Cavs, Griffin spent 17 years with the Phoenix Suns, starting as an intern in communications and working his way up to Suns senior vice president of basketball operations. He also was the Suns assistant general manager of player personnel, director of player personnel, assistant director of player personnel, basketball operations assistant and media relations assistant.

In addition, he also served as the tournament director of the Nike Desert Classic and was an assistant coach at Scottsdale Community College.

As a kid growing up in Phoenix, Griffin’s goal was to become general manager of the Suns. Before he even graduated from Arizona State in 1995, he was working for Jerry Colangelo‘s team in a variety of roles that prepared him for the job he is now about to begin.

“You never know what’s in someone’s future when you start off getting your foot in the door and getting your first job,” Colangelo told The Plain Dealer earlier this year. “He was always very diligent, a very hard worker and he just wanted a chance or an opportunity. He was ambitious. He had his sights set on much higher things. I’m not sure he knew at the beginning what that might mean, but he wanted to advance. He wanted to move up the ladder.

“So he paid his dues, he really did, in every sense of the word. Here’s a guy who has been somewhat of a lifer who now has his opportunity, but he’s earned that. It wasn’t gifted to him. It wasn’t handed to him. He paid his dues along the way and did a great job. Now he’s got a chance to pave his own future.”

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No. 3: Amar’e endorses Steve Kerr — New York Knicks forward Amar’e Stoudemire has experience with Steve Kerr from his time with the Phoenix Suns when Kerr was general manager of the team. Stoudemire “adored” his championship mentality and endorses his bid for coach of the Knicks. Ian Begley of ESPN New York has more:

Steve Kerr hasn’t decided yet whether he’ll become the head coach of the Knicks. But if he ends up in New York, Kerr will have a strong supporter in Amar’e Stoudemire.

“I like Steve Kerr. For one, when he was a GM (in Phoenix, when Stoudemire was with the Suns) he was always preaching about winning and winning a title and that’s something that I adored about him,” Stoudemire said earlier this week on “The Herd with Colin Cowherd” on ESPN Radio. “And then also, secondly, he has a formula to win; he’s been a winner in this league before. He wants to win. And he reminds me of somewhat of a player-coach that knows the game and knows what players go through as far as ups and downs throughout the year and that’s going to help him.”

Kerr, according to an NBA source, is with his family in San Diego contemplating offers to coach the Knicks and the Warriors or remaining with TNT as a broadcaster. The Knicks are believed to be the favorite, thanks to Kerr’s strong ties to Knicks president Phil Jackson. It is unclear if either team has made a formal contract offer.

The Knicks are expected to offer a deal that is close in length to the five-year contract Jackson signed in March. If New York ends up in a bidding war with Golden State over Kerr’s services, it would surprise many around the league if Knicks owner James Dolan loses that fight.

There is one aspect of the Kerr-Golden State dynamic that appears in the Knicks’ favor. There is somewhat of a split in the Warriors organization in its support for Kerr. Two sources told ESPNNewYork.com on Thursday that management prefers Kerr but some players have privately expressed support for another candidate, Stan Van Gundy.

If Kerr ends up in New York, Stoudemire is confident he can thrive under the leadership of Kerr and Jackson. The 11-year veteran pointed out that versatile big men such as Pau Gasol have thrived in Jackson’s triangle offense.

“I think what he looks for in bigs are bigs that have multiple skills,” Stoudemire said. “You better shoot the ball from the outside, put the ball on the floor when need be, make great passes out of double-teams, sort of being a pressure-release guy. Versatile bigs are what I think he looks for and that’s what I am.”

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No. 4: Warriors don’t expect to land Kerr — More Kerr news. The Golden State Warriors reportedly would love to hire Kerr, as well. Especially since Kerr and Warriors owner Joe Lacob have been family friends for years. But they reportedly don’t expect to land him with Kerr deep in negotiation talks with Phil Jackson and the New York Knicks for their coaching position. Marc Stein of ESPN.com reports:

Sources told ESPN.com that the Warriors fear Kerr is “too deep” in talks with the Knicks and new shot-caller Phil Jackson to convince Kerr to rebuff Jackson now, despite Kerr’s close relationship with Warriors owner Joe Lacob and team president Rick Welts, as well as Golden State’s proximity to Kerr’s offseason home in San Diego.

But sources also stressed that Stan Van Gundy is actually the closest thing to a top target at this early stage of Golden State’s search for a successor to the fired Mark Jackson, based at least in part on the premise that an experienced coach can ensure that the Warriors maintain upward momentum in the ultra-competitive Western Conference.

ESPN.com reported April 29 that the Knicks were pressing to try to get Kerr formally signed as their new coach when the first round of the playoffs ended, partly because they knew other teams would soon pursue the TNT broadcaster. The Knicks, though, were forced to relent on that timetable and continue to negotiate with former New York Jets general manager Mike Tannebaum, who is serving as Kerr’s representative.

The Warriors immediately joined the list of prime suitors for Kerr after firing Mark Jackson on Tuesday. ESPN.com also reported earlier this week that the Utah Jazz hoped to court Kerr for their opening as well.

Kerr has been huddling with family members in advance of his next TV assignment with TNT: Tuesday’s Game 5 of the Oklahoma City/Los Angeles Clippers series. A timetable for striking a deal with the Knicks remains unclear, but nothing has yet managed to threaten New York’s longstanding status as the favorite to land Kerr as its successor to Mike Woodson.

The longer it goes without New York and Kerr closing a deal, according to one source, does give the Warriors a small measure of hope that Kerr would give them renewed consideration. But the consistent word for days in coaching circles holds that Kerr — who, at 48, has never coached at any level — would find it hard to walk away from Jackson at this advanced stage of negotiations because of the pair’s close relationship.

Kerr is that rare individual in the NBA who can claim both Jackson and one of Jackson’s oldest rivals — San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich — as mentors. As such, Kerr is said to be highly optimistic about Jackson’s ability to make a major impact as a rookie executive with the Knicks, which runs counter to the more common skepticism about Jackson’s effectiveness in his new job. Only in New York, furthermore, would Kerr have the chance to be mentored by a championship coach, reminiscent of the way Pat Riley groomed Erik Spoelstra in Miami.

Sources say that the Warriors, meanwhile, are still establishing a list of candidates to consider, with Van Gundy — after successful stints coaching the Miami Heat and Orlando Magic — still at the front of that line.

ESPN.com reported last Sunday that Van Gundy and Kerr were Golden State’s top two choices if Mark Jackson were fired. Van Gundy doesn’t have the close ties with Warriors management that Kerr has, but he does have a decorated resume that undoubtedly intrigues Warriors officials, who are under some pressure to make a splashy hire to replace the ousted Jackson after all the public support he received from Golden State star Stephen Curry and other Warriors players.

In a radio interview Thursday with 740 AM in Orlando, Van Gundy admitted that he’s not sure if he’s ready to return to coaching after spending the past two seasons in broadcasting and focusing on family time.

“Part of me does, and part of me doesn’t,” Van Gundy told the network. “Look, we’re so happy in Central Florida. It would really have to be a great situation for me to get back in. I miss a lot of it. I really do. I miss the competition. I miss the challenge. I miss the camaraderie of it. But I also like the time that I’ve had, so we’ll just have to see what happens. You weigh every situation.

“Names come up on every job, and my name’s been mentioned in a few,” Van Gundy continued. “But I think the Warrior one comes up because I’m from out there. I went to high school in the Bay Area. I grew up out there. I said several times during my coaching career when we would go play out there that it was always important to me playing out there because I grew up [there].”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Lionel Hollins is expected to interview for the Warriors’ coach position this week in Chicago. … John Wall is hampered by a scratched eye he obtained in Game 3, which continues to affect his vision. … Giannis Antetokounmpo stars in a Greek commercial for chocolate milk. … LeBron James is excited to watch quarterback Johnny Manziel play football with the Cleveland Browns.

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY: Celebrate Mother’s Day today by watching newly crowned MVP Kevin Durant discuss the importance of his mom on NBA TV’s Inside Stuff:


VIDEO: Inside Stuff: KD