Posts Tagged ‘Golden State Warriors’

Durant suffers ‘mild’ ankle sprain, misses 2nd half against Warriors


VIDEO: Kevin Durant turns his right ankle against the Golden State Warriors

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — What had the makings of a record night for Kevin Durant ended before halftime against the Golden State Warriors for the reigning MVP.

Durant turned his right ankle on a drive to the basket with 2.4 seconds to play before halftime and did not return for the second half. Precautionary X-rays taken at the arena in Oakland during halftime were “negative” according to TNT sideline reporter Louis Johnson and the injury was classified as a mild ankle sprain. The news spread quickly on social media.

Durant had piled up 30 points in 20 minutes before going down, making him the first player since the NBA/ABA merger to do so. A fractured foot on that same leg cost Durant all but the Thunder’s last eight games. And he was still playing on a minutes restriction to safeguard against his previous injury.

The Thunder led by 17 points early with Durant leading the way against the Warriors, but trailed 65-63 at halftime.

UPDATE: Durant’s X-rays came back negative.


VIDEO: Durant says injury not big concern, will be cautious

Warriors’ Bogut out indefinitely

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – It’s been a rough week (relatively speaking) for the Golden State Warriors. On Tuesday, their 16-game winning streak came to an end. And on Thursday, they announced that center Andrew Bogut would be out indefinitely after undergoing platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy on his right knee.

Bogut’s value to the Warriors is huge. He’s the anchor of their No. 1 defense, ranking as one of the league’s best rim protectors. The Dubs have allowed just 91.3 points per 100 possessions with him on the floor, vs. 98.6 with him on the bench.

Golden State still ranks as one of the deepest teams in the league. They have Festus Ezeli and Marreese Speights to man the center spot in Bogut’s absence, and they could get David Lee back on Monday. They’re fortunate to have three days off after hosting the Oklahoma City on Thursday (10:30 p.m. ET, TNT).

But Bogut is a big part of what they do on both ends of the floor. Not only have the Warriors improved defensively, but they’ve become more efficient on offense with increased ball movement. And Bogut ranks second among centers in assist ratio.

Golden State has the best record in the league, but they’re just two games ahead of fourth-place Portland in the Western Conference before Thursday’s games. And they don’t know when they’re getting back one of their most important players.

GM Myers: Warriors have contacted Ray Allen

Ray Allen has taken more 3-pointers, and made more, than anybody in NBA history. (David Dow/NBAE)

Ray Allen has taken more 3-pointers, and made more, than anybody in NBA history. (David Dow/NBAE)

NBA.com staff reports

The league-leading Golden State Warriors have reached out to free agent Ray Allen‘s representation, general manager Bob Myers confirmed on Thursday.

Allen has reportedly been fielding offers from several teams over the first month of the season and Meyers admitted, “it’s uncertain as to what Ray wants to do.”

The 10-time All-Star is the all-time leader in 3-pointers made and would seemingly be right at home alongside sharp-shooters Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson. However, it’s unclear how large a contribution the 39-year-old guard could provide to a contender.

NBA All-Star Balloting 2015 Starts Now

HANG TIME BIG CITY — It’s time to get out the vote.

With about a quarter of the NBA season in the books, and the 2015 NBA All-Star Weekend about two months away, voting begins today for the 2015 All-Star Game thanks to NBA All-Star Balloting 2015 presented by Sprint…with a decidedly new twist.
For years, fans have been able to cast All-Star votes for most of their favorite NBA players. But this year, for the first time ever, they can vote for literally any NBA player. In years past the ballot contained 60 players from each conference who were determined by a panel of broadcasters and media members. While fans will continue to select two guards and three frontcourt players when selecting starters, with the new online ballot they have the ability to choose from the entire NBA player pool.

Another wrinkle new to the ballot is SAP, which will integrate daily stats into the online ballot. Fans will have the ability to sort players by their current stats from NBA.com/stats powered by SAP HANA.

Updating the official ballot on NBA.com to include all NBA players will complement the options afforded by the NBA’s all-digital voting program, which also includes Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, SMS, NBA Game Time and NBA Game Time from Sprint applications, as well as Sina Weibo and Tencent Microblog in China. Balloting concludes on Monday, Jan. 19, and starters will be announced live on TNT on Thursday, Jan. 22, during a special one-hour edition of TNT NBA Tip-Off presented by Autotrader.com at 7 p.m. E.T.
Last season, LeBron James was the leading overall vote-getter with 1,416,419 votes, although this season he may see his voting power base shift from South Florida to Ohio. Kevin Durant of the Oklahoma City Thunder finished second last season with 1,396,294 votes.

Although he didn’t play last season while recovering from Achilles tendon surgery, Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant has the chance to make his 17th All-Star roster, which would put him two games behind all-time leader Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

While this has been one of the most competitive early seasons in recent memory, there may not be much room for new All-Stars. Last season, Stephen Curry, Anthony Davis, Damian Lillard, Paul Millsap and John Wall all made their All-Star debuts, and thus far this season, all would seem to be on paths toward returning. With so many incumbent All-Stars reprising their performances early on this year, it bears watching to see if a player like Sacramento’s DeMarcus Cousins, who is currently tied for the lead league in rebounds per game at 12.6, will be able to play his way on to the roster. Similarly, Boston’s Rajon Rondo, a four-time All-Star who missed last season’s game while recovering from injury, currently leads the league at 10.8 assists per game.

At least one starting position on the Eastern Conference team will be up for grabs, as 2014 starter Paul George from the Indiana Pacers is out recovering from a fractured leg. Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan also made last season’s Eastern Conference roster as a reserve, but is currently out and hasn’t played since November 28 after suffering a torn tendon.

A strong contender for George’s starting spot may come from Cleveland. Last season, then-Minnesota forward Kevin Love was voted to the Western Conference starting line-up, but his off-season trade to Cleveland not only shifts his Conference allegiance, it also opens a starting spot for the Western Conference. Love narrowly beat out Houston’s Dwight Howard for that starting position in 2014.

The 64th NBA All-Star Game will be played in New York City’s iconic Madison Square Garden, home of the New York Knicks, on Sunday, February 15, 2015. The BBVA Rising Stars Challenge, Sprint NBA All-Star Celebrity Game and State Farm All-Star Saturday Night — including the Sears Shooting Stars, Taco Bell Skills Challenge, Foot Locker Three-Point Contest and Sprite Slam Dunk — will be held at Barclays Center, home of the Brooklyn Nets. The recently-debuted uniforms feature nods to all five boroughs of New York City.

Morning shootaround — Dec. 11


VIDEO:
Highlights from games played Dec. 10

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Nets move Kirilenko | Knicks project united front | Rondo, Stephenson get physical | Warriors introduce new arena redesign

No. 1: Nets move Kirilenko — It’s not a member of their core, but the Nets have agreed to a trade that clears a bit of cap space. Forward Andrei Kirilenko goes from Brooklyn to Philadelphia, saving the Nets some cash, and the Nets add forward Brandon Davies and his non-guaranteed contract. As our John Schuhmann writes, it sure looks like neither player may be long for his new team…

Brandon Davies isn’t completely awful, but his contract is non-guaranteed, so the Nets could waive him and not have to pay him anything. Assuming they do, the trade would save them about $6.6 million in luxury tax payments, in addition to about $2.6 million of Kirilenko’s salary. If they include another player in the deal, they save more.

The deal will also give them a trade exception and an open roster spot. Both of those give them a little more flexibility in making future trades.

The Sixers get a little closer to the salary floor, not that it matters. They probably won’t keep Kirilenko, who hasn’t played since Nov. 13, hasn’t made a shot (or been in the Nets’ rotation) all season, and is dealing with a personal issue that has kept him away from the team.

***

No. 2: Knicks project united front — The Knicks have only won four games this season, but that hasn’t kept them from making headlines early on. According to a report yesterday from ESPN’s Chris Broussard, things behind the scenes with the Knicks have been as calamitous as their play on the court has been. Writes Broussard…

The New York Knicks were en route to their fifth straight loss last week against Brooklyn when a frustrated Tim Hardaway Jr. screamed angrily, “Get the rebound!”

Certain his second-year teammate was speaking to him, Carmelo Anthony approached Hardaway on the way down the court and used an expletive to ask Hardaway who in the world he thought he was talking to.

Anthony, according to sources, used another expletive in telling Hardaway he was going to beat him up when they got into the locker room after the game.

While the two players never wound up fighting, the episode was emblematic of the volatile state of the Knicks. Off to their worst start in franchise history at 4-19, the Knicks are a team full of discord, defiance and doubt, according to sources with knowledge of the situation.

“Nobody’s taken a swing at anybody, but there’s a lot of arguing and cursing each other out after games,” one source said.

In addition to the Knicks’ lack of chemistry, sources say the players believe coach Derek Fisher’s insistence on running the triangle offense is another key reason for New York’s struggles.

After the ESPN report was published, the Knicks players met with the media while on the road in San Antonio and said things were not as bad as they sounded, noting that they had recently held a player’s-only meeting to help get everyone on the same page…

The Knicks started the day tied for the most losses in the league — seemingly ripe conditions for a story to emerge about internal discord. The article said that Anthony had a verbal spat with teammate Tim Hardaway Jr. during a game last week against the Nets. The report also said that Knicks players told Anthony that they were unhappy with his style of play — that he was not playing team basketball — and also that many players were displeased with Coach Derek Fisher’s systems.

Neither Anthony nor Hardaway denied on Wednesday that they had clashed on the court, but both men said the issue was behind them and described a fruitful mentor-student relationship. Anthony, meanwhile, reiterated his commitment to the team and to perfecting Fisher’s system, including the triangle offense.

As far as hearing criticism from his teammates, Anthony revealed that there was a players-only meeting on Saturday at the team’s practice facility in which various concerns were raised, but he denied it had become particularly contentious.

“Everybody had a platform to speak their piece, and what they felt about what’s going on, and how we can better the situation,” Anthony said. “But it wasn’t no pointing fingers or anything like that, or solely pointing me out to be blamed.”

While reports of relationship issues may be overblown, a 4-20 record doesn’t lie: The Knicks lost big last night to a Spurs team missing Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Kawhi Leonard.

***

No. 3: Rondo, Stephenson get physical — During last night’s Celtics/Hornets game, with both teams desperate for a win, two of the NBA’s more competitive players found themselves in a battle neither could really win. Boston’s Rajon Rondo and Charlotte’s Lance Stephenson ended up banging into each other more than once, and as Jay King writes, to hear Rondo tell it, there may have been some flopping involved…

About five minutes into the third quarter of a 96-87 Boston Celtics loss, Rondo threw a high elbow that sent Stephenson tumbling to the court. The Charlette Hornets wing stood up and got in Rondo’s face; later in the same possession, after what looked like some jawing, both players were hit with technical fouls.

Asked about what happened, Rondo initially said, “Nothing at all. I said something to him and I didn’t know what I said could get a tech.”

Pressed on the elbow, the Celtics guard obviously implied Stephenson took a dive.

“He weighs about 60 more pounds than me, but that’s part of his game,” Rondo said.

“The game is contact. The game we play is contact. Whatever you saw, I don’t know,” he added. “I am strong. But I don’t think I was that strong on that play in particular to knock him down.”

Rondo notched his third triple-double of the season with 12 points, 10 assists and 10 rebounds, but committed three costly turnovers down the stretch. He also got beaten baseline by Kemba Walker for an and-1 with 3:46 left that pushed Charlotte’s lead to 90-85.

“We did (let an opportunity slip away),” Rondo said. “It started with me. I had some key turnovers in the fourth that I should have been able to take better care of the ball. And Kemba Walker had a backdoor play layup. So we’ve got to do better as a team, as a whole. And it starts with myself.”

***

No. 4: Warriors introduce new arena redesign — A few months ago the Golden State Warriors showed off pictures of their planned arena in San Francisco. It was touted as a step forward for the franchise, which currently has the best record in the NBA and has been based in Oakland’s Oracle Arena since 1971. There was one thing people noticed, however, about the new arena drawings: From above, it seemed to look like a toilet. Rather than sit with those criticisms, yesterday the Warriors dropped new sketches of the planned facility that should streamline the exterior of the new space

Gone is much of the rectangular viewing deck that, when coupled with the oval arena, gave the overhead view of the place the appearance of a giant toilet seat with the lid down. The deck has been shaved down to about half its old size, dropped about 13 feet below the roof line and given a sweeping curve.

“We are trying to flush the toilet bowl forever out of people’s consciousness,” said Warriors arena consultant Jesse Blout.

Instead, it looks more like an old Discman CD player, less likely to be the butt of humor.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Dwight Howard hopes to return Saturday for the Houston Rockets … Tom Thibodeau says any talk of trust issues in Chicago is “garbage.” Taj Gibson respectfully disagreesByron Scott is thinking about starting Kobe Bryant at point guard … The Mavericks are considering options regarding adding another big man … ABC is developing a sitcom about a foreign-born NBA player and his translator.

Blogtable: Golden In Golden State

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: MJ vs. Kobe | Golden in Golden State | Nets’ Trade Options



VIDEO: Inside The NBA: How good are the Warriors?

> The Warriors are off to their best start ever. Did the coaching change make that much of a difference, or was this team destined for greatness, no matter the coaching staff?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: This is a players’ league, so the easy answer would be, this is Golden State’s next logical step. Klay Thompson has emerged as one of the league’s best shooting guards, Stephen Curry and Andrew Bogut have been (mostly) healthy, Draymond Green has raised his game, Marreese Speights has been a nice surprise to ease David Lee’s absence, and so on. But there’s no denying credit to Steve Kerr and the staff he has put together, including Ron Adams and Alvin Gentry. Coaching does matter – and so do Kerr’s smarts and self-effacing manner, the latter a notable change from Mark Jackson’s demeanor.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Not to diminish anything that Steve Kerr has done, but the Warriors were on an upward flight and what’s allowed them to soar is the overall improvement by Klay Thompson and, most important, the health of Andrew Bogut.  The presence of Bogut in the lineup for a full season and the playoffs makes the Warriors a true title contender.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: We won’t know about “greatness” until June. This was going to be a good team no matter what — Mark Jackson proved he could deliver — but, yes, Steve Kerr and his staff deserve a lot of credit for the great start. They would have gotten the blame if things went south, so they get the praise as well. Better ball movement was a 2014-15 priority, and Kerr has made it happen. There are other factors, though. Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson have both improved from last season, as if they weren’t already good enough. Andrew Bogut has been a huge factor, especially on defense. Marreese Speights has been a big bench presence. Andre Iguodala did not pout when he was moved into a reserve role. They were all part of 50-win teams in Golden State before.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I wouldn’t demean Steve Kerr by saying anyone could coach this team, but the Warriors were ready to make the leap to serious contender before he blew into town. Mark Jackson made them a better defensive team and his biggest “crime” was an inability to reach the conference finals which, by the way, is how we’ll judge Kerr this season. Fair enough?

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Warriors’ success is a mix of talent, Mark Jackson’s coaching and Steve Kerr’s coaching. There’s just a terrific mix of skills and size among the top seven guys (eight when David Lee’s healthy) in their rotation. Jackson guided them a top-five ranking on defense and Kerr has been smart not to mess with that side of the ball. But he deserves credit for bringing more ball movement to their offense, which also ranks in the top five this season, as well as making a lineup change (Harrison Barnes starting) that has worked out so well.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The Warriors are a beautiful mix of wicked talent at basically every position, an overall vision of how that group would play and the keen coaching eye of Steve Kerr and his predecessor, Mark Jackson, both of whom are smart enough to recognize what they’re working with and refraining from the urge to overcoach. Kerr could have come in and tried to reinvent the game for Steph Curry, Klay Thompson and the boys. Wisely, he tweaked some things and made some subtle moves (and had others made for him, namely Draymond Green ‘s emergence in place of an injured David Lee) while also allowing an already accomplished team continue its ascent. Sometimes the smartest thing a good new coach can do is curb his enthusiasm to fix what doesn’t need fixing.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Mark Jackson established their defensive-minded foundation, and Steve Kerr built up from that base by turning those defensive stops into more efficient possessions. So each coach deserves credit: the Warriors are cleaning up because Jackson and Kerr have turned out to be indispensable.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: It’s easy to credit all of Golden State’s success to Steve Kerr stepping onto the sideline. And Kerr definitely deserves a lot of credit — he’s putting players in the right positions to be ultra-successful and they have shown no signs of slowing down from their hot start. But I don’t think you can overlook the personal development shown by players like Draymond Green, Klay Thompson, and even Stephen Curry, particularly Curry and Klay. As good as those two were a season ago, they put in work and showed up this season improved from where they ended last season.

Aldo Avinante, NBA.com/PhilippinesThey have the personnel to be great but the coaching change also helped a lot, they were predictable last year compared to their tempo this year with more passing and moving, also they are utilizing Andrew Bogut more, who is a great-passing big man. With everyone sharing the basketball it makes them more harder to stop while gives everyone the motivation to play harder on defense.

Guillermo Garcia, NBA.com/MexicoIf you’re looking for the one major difference, Steve Kerr has gotten this team to play even better defensively — a process that Jackson, no doubt, started.

Simon Legg, NBA.com/AustraliaI don’t think we can say this team was destined for greatness regardless of who was at the helm, they needed the right teacher to steer them in the right direction. Despite creating an elite defense, Mark Jackson was not the guy to make this happen. Think of all the scoring firepower and natural talent on this team, then look at their offensive rating last season. How can a team with the Splash Brothers, Andre Iguodala, David Lee and Andrew Bogut’s elite interior passing and the rest of the guys rank 12th in offensive efficiency? Steve Kerr has kept the fundamentals defensively, and then completely flipped the script on their offensive philosophy. It’s about passing and moving, not about Steph Curry or Klay Thompson chewing up the shot clock with isos. Kerr has also brought the best out of Bogut, a guy who has always been thought of as an elite passer, but he never had the chance to showcase this in Oakland. The locker room looks like a happier place, and the players enjoy the approach of their new coach.

Akshay Manwani, NBA.com/IndiaThe change in coaching staff has definitely made the greater impact on the Warriors’ fortunes this season.  The Warriors were always talented which is why they could make it to the playoffs in the past two seasons purely on Mark Jackson’s emotionally-charged coaching style. This season, though, the Warriors are much better on the offensive and the defensive ends. They have the best net rating of +12.8 in the league. That doesn’t happen just with talent. Steve Kerr has to be complimented for that. Bringing Andre Iguodala off the bench has been another one of his minor tweakings, which has paid off big time for the Warriors. Yes sir, the coaching change has made the bigger difference.

Stefan Petri, NBA.com/DeutschlandIt’s both. This is not meant to be a knock against Mark Jackson, who was a terrific motivator in his own right, but Steve Kerr learned from the very best in Phil Jackson and Gregg Popovich. Plus, he profits from his time as President and GM in Phoenix. Still: Let’s judge him once he gets his feet wet in the playoffs. On the other hand Steph Curry and Klay Thompson were bound to improve, Andrew Bogut has stayed healthy and David Lee’s injury might have been a blessing in disguise. Let me go out on a limb and say: The team would have made another step with Jackson as well, but it wouldn’t have been this good.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA.com/GreeceMark Jackson is an unlucky man. He was the coach that worked hard to built the team that know is off to their best start ever. It’s the same core of players that grew up and stepped up this year. But, of course the new coach, Steve Kerr, has to be given credit, because he tried to put his coaching touch in the playing style of the Warriors, without messing up the chemistry that was already there.

For more debates, go to #AmexNBA or www.nba.com/homecourtadvantage.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 180) Featuring Kemba Walker

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – The Charlotte Hornets weren’t supposed to be in this predicament nearly a quarter of the way through this NBA season, staring up at the competition in the Eastern Conference standings.

If it was up to Kemba Walker, their star point guard and resident big shot artist, they wouldn’t be. And yet here they are, 5-15 and having to dig their way out of the rubble of their early season struggles. (And don’t blame Lance Stephenson either, Kemba doesn’t.)

We go under the hood of the Hornets with Walker for just a piece of the wild Episode 180 of the Hang Time Podcast, which also includes discussions on the Royal visit in Brooklyn to see LeBron James and the Cavaliers, Kobe Bryant‘s continued pursuit Michael Jordan and the No. 3 spot on the all-time scoring list, Chris Rock‘s new hit comedy (Lang spent some time with the star and the rest of his cast) and more.

As usual, we’ve got all the answers on Episode 180 of the Hang Time Podcast featuring Hornets guard Kemba Walker

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the new best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Andrew Merriam.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: Chris Rock and the cast of Top Five spend some quality time with Lang Whitaker

Morning shootaround — Dec. 9


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Dec. 8

NEWS OF THE MORNING

John Wall fights through emotions | Phil Jackson must deal with the Knicks | Royals land in Brooklyn

No. 1: Wall wins, then bemoans a loss — It was a bittersweet night for Wizards guard John Wall, who somehow survived his emotions. He led the Wizards to a pulsating 133-132 double-overtime win over the Celtics by scoring Washington’s final 10 points. Wall had a career-high 17 assists and tacked on 26 points. But his postgame was anything but euphoric. Wall spoke through tears while describing the death earlier Monday of Miyah Telemaque-Nelson, a 6-year-old fan he’d met in March and supported her fight against Burkitt’s Lymphoma. J. Michael of CSN Washington brings some clarity:

“It said my little buddy has passed,” Wall said. “I didn’t respond. I went back to sleep and didn’t really want to think about it. It was kind of tough throughout the day knowing how hard she fought for it. Her last game she was supposed to be able to come to was the Lakers game [last week] and she couldn’t make it. It was tough for me. It was tough for her family. I haven’t had the opportunity to talk to them today. … This game was really meant for her. It would’ve been even tougher to lose it. God has a plan and I just went into a mode where I didn’t want to lose this game.”

Wall had a tearful walk-off interview with CSN Washington that made your heart ache. It showed how truly affected he was about someone who clearly meant plenty to him, even though she wasn’t part of his life until recently. Wall also took to Twitter to convey his grief:

“If you were blessed to meet and get to know Miyah you know how special of a little girl she was. I’m saddened by the news but I know that she’s in a better place. Keep her family in your prayers. I’ll definitely miss my buddy. Rest In Peace Miyah.”


VIDEO: John Wall emotional speaking about young girl

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No. 2: Phil gets Phrank about the Knicks — Phil Jackson gave a rather pointed analysis of the Knicks in a semi-regular meeting with reporters and there was no sense candy-coating the worst start in team history. The team president said the Knicks have a “loser’s mentality” right now because they’re not finishing games. Ian OConnor of ESPN New York went a bit further and put the plight of the Knicks right in Jackson’s lap. He wrote:

Those aren’t Dolan’s 4-18 Knicks with the loser’s mentality. Those are Jackson’s 4-18 Knicks with the loser’s mentality and the potential to inflict unnecessary damage on what had been a near-perfect NBA career.

As a rookie team president marrying into a dysfunctional corporate family, Jackson knew he was taking a high-stakes gamble here. He knew the Knicks owner and amateur-hour musician could put down his guitar at any moment and, without notice, that James Dolan could go back to thinking he was James Naismith.

But there’s been little evidence of much meddling to date, and here’s the truth: Dolan paid Jackson superstar money, in part, so the executive would also take the blame if the new program unraveled like all the old programs did. So Jackson has to be looking around now and wondering if this was all some big mistake, wondering if he has any chance over the next five seasons to make it out of New York alive.

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No. 3: ‘The King’ meets real Royalty — So there was a big buzz in Brooklyn Monday night; maybe you heard. No, it wasn’t about the Nets; expectations have been lowered about them for some time. Prince William and Kate Middleton were in the States on a goodwill tour (and yes, some shopping as well) and Barclays Center was filled to the gills with paparazzi and whatnot. It takes quite an event to make LeBron James the No. 2 attraction; he and the Cavs were the “other” visitors in the building. Fil Bondy of the New York Daily News thought it was quite odd that the Royal Couple would take in a basketball game, of all sports. His take:

The Brits are so much like us, they’re practically Canadian. They speak our language, join us in both our valiant and wrongheaded wars. It’s only natural we want them to love us, love our games.

Except they don’t. Not really, no matter how hard we try to transplant our professional sports overseas and generate even more revenues. The Brits don’t need our American football because they have their beloved rugby to fill that violent niche. They don’t really get our basketball, not viscerally, not like the Italians, French and Spaniards.

Why not? Simon Barnes, the former Times of London columnist, once summarized his indifference toward basketball in two words: “No midfield.” There you have it. Football isn’t rugby. Basketball isn’t soccer, or tennis. Odds are that William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, prefer sitting quietly in the royal box at Wimbledon watching Andy Murray moan and groan his way to another Grand Slam quarterfinal. We still remember how Princess Diana was uncannily transfixed by Pete Sampras’s one-handed backhand.

Still, for the sake of their charitable Royal Foundation and a partnership with the NBA in wildlife conservation, William and Kate headed to Brooklyn on Monday night to watch several minutes of the Cavs’ 110-88 victory over the Nets, featuring the world’s greatest basketball player. Or, as one perplexed British news-side journalist asked on the phone, back to his editor, “Luh-Braun James, is it?”

The Duke and Duchess arrived with seven minutes left in the third quarter to a standing O and sat next to Dikembe Mutombo, the popular NBA ambassador. They later posed for pictures with commissioner Silver and LeBron. In all, it was a jolly good time.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Steph Curry thinks recent comments by Warriors owner Joe Lacob were a distraction  …  Steve Clifford‘s final deal with the Hornets is now guaranteed for 2015-16

ICYMI of the Night: Blake Griffin‘s final points in a 45-point performance against the Suns came on a 3-pointer, of all shots


VIDEO: Blake Griffin nails the game-winner 3 at the buzzer

 

 

One Stat, One Play: Bogut protects


VIDEO: One Stat, One Play: Bogut protects the rim

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – To compete for a championship, you need a strong defense. And if you want a strong defense, you have to protect the rim.

The Golden State Warriors have the league’s No. 1 defense, in part, because they’re the best in the league at protecting the rim. The Warriors are the only team that ranks in the top five in both opponent field goal percentage in the restricted area and percentage of opponent shots that are taken there.

20141204_opp_ra

The restricted area is the most efficient place to score. The Warriors not only defend shots there well, but also prevent their opponents from getting shots there in the first place.

The keys are Andrew Bogut and a pick-and-roll scheme that keeps him near the basket. The Warriors have Bogut sag back on pick-and-rolls to force mid-range shots, protect the rim, and be in position to rebound.

According to SportVU, opponents have shot just 39.3 percent at the rim when Bogut’s been there defending it. That’s the lowest mark among 65 players who have defended at least five shots at the rim in at least five games.

The Warriors’ scheme also allows the defenders not involved in the pick-and-roll to stay at home on shooters. According to SportVU, they’ve contested 38.2 percent of their opponents’ jump shots, the second highest rate in the league. And they rank fourth in opponent 3-point percentage.

The video above is the latest installment “One Stat, One Play,” a look at how the Bogut and the Warriors keep their opponents away from the rim.

Golden State hosts the New Orleans Pelicans in the second game of TNT’s double-header (10:30 p.m. ET) on Thursday.

Morning shootaround — Dec. 2


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Dec. 1

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Durant could be game-time decision | Report: Cavs submit bid to host All-Star Game | Green shining for Golden State | Faried’s game off the mark

No. 1: Durant could be game-time decision Tuesday — The Oklahoma City Thunder got All-Star point guard Russell Westbrook back from injury last week and he looked more than fine in his debut, roasting the New York Knicks to the tune of 32 points, eight assists and seven rebounds. Could his All-Star partner in crime (and the reigning MVP) Kevin Durant be back from his injury as soon as tonight in New Orleans (8 ET, League Pass)? We likely won’t know until OKC holds its morning shootaround, writes Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman:

Scott Brooks stopped and thought about the question before answering.

“Any lineup changes?” the coach was asked Monday.

Brooks began with an “Um” before proceeding with a pregnant pause that left all in attendance at the end of the Thunder’s practice wondering if this would be the moment he announced Kevin Durant is back.

“No,” Brooks then said, finally. “Nothing as of yet.”

The “as of yet” part left Durant’s timetable up to interpretation, and it’s looking and sounding more and more like the reigning MVP is extremely close to making his season debut, perhaps as early as Tuesday at New Orleans.

It’s not out of the question that Brooks will announce Durant as a game-time decision at the team’s Tuesday morning shootaround. Traditionally, the Thunder has preferred to see how players coming back from injuries respond to that light morning session before penciling them into the lineup. In rare cases, like Andre Roberson at Denver on Nov. 19, the Thunder will even wait for a player to go through a final pre-game workout before determining whether he will suit up that night.

But in the case of Durant, all indications are that he’s set to return from a season long absence caused by a broken right foot. He appears to be so close that any game from here out could be the night. If he doesn’t take the court Tuesday night at New Orleans, it would be surprising if he doesn’t play Friday at Philadelphia. If he skips the Sixers game, we’d be shocked if he doesn’t make his debut Sunday at Detroit.

The Thunder will have two more days between the Pelicans game and the Sixers game, and that’s just additional practice time and rest to ensure Durant is acclimated and ready if he doesn’t play Tuesday night.

Both the signs and the Thunder’s schedule are lining up.


VIDEO: OKC players and coaches talk after Monday’s practice

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