Posts Tagged ‘Glenn Robinson III’

Glen Robinson III fighting his college reputation

No. 40 pick Glen Robinson III looks to disprove doubters who say he coasts on the court.

No. 40 pick Glen Robinson III looks to disprove doubters who say he is too passive on the court.

LAS VEGAS – He should start a fight.

It doesn’t matter who it’s with, it doesn’t matter what it’s about. A cheap shot under the basket. The temperature on the team bus to the arena. Who should be first in line at the breakfast buffet. Anything.

Just start a fight.

“I don’t think that’s necessary,” Glenn Robinson III said through a smile, getting the point but disagreeing with it. “It might happen in practice or something. I need to keep my head, keep my cool.”

He needs to show a fire. Robinson fell to the Timberwolves at No. 40 in the draft on June 26 because a lot of teams saw him as too passive in a 2013-14 at Michigan that was set up for success with the departures of Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway Jr. but ended with questions about GRIII lacking intensity. They were frustrated that he didn’t seem more frustrated.

This summer league and the rookie season in Minnesota that follows is about proving he won’t cruise through games, that his attitude will match his billing as a small forward with the talent to be in the lottery conversation six or eight months ago. That talk faded, obviously, but the skill set did not, so Robinson begins the transition to the NBA needing to take on an image as well as every human opponent.

“Something that really helps me is just talking on the court, whether that’s smack talking or joking around,” he said. “It’s talking and keeping that motor up.”

It’s trash talking more than before.

“Oh, yeah,” Robinson said. “Definitely…. Whoever’s guarding me. Everybody talks out there. That’s something that’s a little trick that I’ve found to keep my motor up.”

The son of Big Dog Glenn Robinson, a two-time All-Star with the Bucks in the early-2000s as part of an 11-year career with four teams, is that conscious of wanting to appear locked in. Last season, he re-watched a lot of games the same night, sometimes with Michigan coaches and sometimes when he got home or back to the hotel room, not agreeing with the assessment that he was cruising but that there were “a couple possessions maybe I could sprint my lane a little faster or maybe try to grab some offensive rebounds.”  Also, that “a lot of people tell me the game seems to come easy to me. I think that’s more what it is. I have the same facial expression or am relaxed all the time.”

Wanting to be much more than a what-could-have-been, GRIII is using the same level of self-analysis at the start of his NBA career. Because not agreeing with the assessment is different than not taking the comments to heart as a way to get better.

“I never felt like I was drifting or I never felt like I wasn’t playing 100 percent,” he said. “But if it’s there, you have to make adjustments. You have to change that.”

So, he trash talks. He jokes on the court. Anything to get a reaction. No fights, though.

Even if he should.

Not all second-rounders are long shots

VIDEO: The Starters pick the best all time second-rounders

Summer League begins Saturday in Orlando, and so does the climb for many of its players.

Most of the second-rounders drafted last Thursday will play at the Magic facility or the larger Las Vegas gathering next week at two UNLV sites, except for prospects nursing injuries or staying overseas. Many of the 30 picked without the certainty of a guaranteed contract will stick on opening-night rosters in the fall, even if most of their real action will come in the D-League. And some will even build full careers as real contributors, more than riding the bubble from season to season.

The buildup was true and the 2014 draft turned out to have the kind of depth that could produce legit players, not just sparring partners for practice, in the second round. It was the draft where several prospects being mentioned beforehand by front offices as first-round possibilities fell into the bottom 30, making those players sleepers to make an impact.

The five with the best chance to last:

1. K.J. McDaniels, 32nd pick, 76ers

The concern is that he is slightly undersized for a small forward at 6-foot-6 and 200 pounds. The counter is, though, what an athlete. He’s a player being able to jump over an opponent — any opponent. Beyond the physical gifts, the Clemson product can be, as SMU coach Larry Brown suggested, a human stat sheet — not putting up flashy numbers any one place but piling up points, rebounds and blocks in a way that means a contribution in several different areas. Some teams believe he can develop into a defensive presence against small forwards, shooting guards and even some point guards.

2. Glenn Robinson III, 40th pick, Timberwolves

It’s about the attitude. If Big Dog’s son has the same passive approach that cost him the chance to take over at Michigan following the departure of Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway Jr., his ceiling is role player at best. If GRIII learns to play with intensity, though. the small forward will have a better career than a lot of players picked 15 or 20 spots higher. Especially if he also adds range to his shot.

3. Jarnell Stokes, 35th pick, Grizzlies

Drafted by Utah and traded to Memphis, Stokes can become an inside presence, a power forward who will generate rebounds, especially offensive boards, with strength and also make passes from the post. He is coming off a leading role on Tennessee’s run to the Sweet 16 and as a member of the U.S. team that won the gold medal at the under-19 world championships, part of a trajectory that indicates a player that continues to improve.

4. Cameron Bairstow, 49th pick, Bulls

The other Australian in the Dante Exum draft. Bairstow will be dependable and solid on several fronts, a power forward-center with a nice mid-range shot, an improving post game and a drive to get better. And he will do it with a motor constantly running in the red. That’s a lot of possibilities. If he proves he can defend NBA bigs, he has a nice future.

5. Walter Tavares, 43rd pick, Hawks

Tavares is a project — a 22-year-old, 7-foot-3 center who has only been playing since 2009 — worth the ride to the end. A 7-9 wingspan and some teams rating him in low-to-mid 30s is convincing like that. He has already progressed to being a shot blocker and general defensive presence. Imagine if he becomes more comfortable on offense. Imagine what even a single season of NBA practices and conditioning program will do. Just imagine.

A few others: Semaj Christon, 55th pick, Thunder. A wild card, emphasis on wild, who can be something if he harnesses the great speed and cut down on ball-handling mistakes. … Thanasis Antetokounmpo, 51st pick, Knicks. Not the level of prospect of younger brother Giannis, but a possible versatile defender. … Spencer Dinwiddie, 38th pick, Pistons. It’s tough to get a read on where he is after knee surgery kept him from workouts and will sideline him from Summer League, but the Colorado guard would have been a strong candidate for the first round if healthy.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 112) Featuring Chris Dortch

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — With the Final Four confetti cleared out of the way and the NBA playoffs just a little over a week away, we decided to spend a little time on what we saw from the college kids and what we might see from them in the future … at least from these college stars who are busy declaring their intentions for the NBA’s June Draft.

The list of early entrants already includes familiar names like Indiana’s Victor Oladipo and Cody Zeller, Syracuse’s Michael Carter-Williams and  Kansas freshman sensation Ben McLemore, among others.

But how many of these college underclassmen are making sound decisions? How many of them are really ready for the rigors that await them in the professional ranks? And are you sure you saw a future NBA sar or two during March Madness?

Michigan’s Trey Burke, the consensus national player of the year, certainly looked the part in the NCAA title game Monday night. And he’s one of four Wolverines who could be headed for the Draft, along with Tim Hardaway Jr. and freshmen Mitch McGary and Glenn Robinson III.

Chris Dortch, the editor of the Blue Ribbon College Basketball Yearbook and NBA.com’s college basketball/Draft expert, joins us to talk about what we saw, who fits where and whether or not they’re making the right choice on Episode 112 of the Hang Time Podcast.

Dortch, who also has a role in the upcoming Jackie Robinson biopic “42″ (in theaters Friday, April 12) also compares notes with our resident thespian. And we also discuss the wisdom of Los Angeles Lakers forward Metta World Peace‘s quick return from knee surgery, Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose‘s chances of returning this season from his knee surgery, the Knicks and their hot streak and what happens in the streets of LA if the Lakers miss out on the playoffs?

LISTEN HERE:

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