Posts Tagged ‘Gary Williams’

D.C. dreaming of Durant homecoming?


VIDEO: Kevin Durant sits down with NBA.com’s Lang Whitaker

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — LeBron James followed his heart back to Cleveland.

Carmelo Anthony just couldn’t leave his native New York. And Dwyane Wade declared his love for his adopted hometown of Miami.

With all of the talk this summer of stars coming home, staying home and their teams and their cities, can you blame folks in Washington D.C. for daydreaming about a day and time when the NBA’s reigning MVP would consider doing the same?

No one represents for the Washington D.C. area harder or better than Oklahoma City Thunder star Kevin Durant. And that might explain why folks in the DMV (the urban area encompassing D.C., Maryland and Virginia) are already buzzing about a Durant homecoming one day.

Even if it is just a pipe dream, one that Thunder fans want nothing to do with, it’s one that is being talked about two seasons before Durant becomes a free agent. Washington Wizards fans and observers are already daydreaming about what their up-and-coming team can do to lure Durant back home come the summer of 2017.

Former Maryland coach and Hall of Famer Gary Williams knows the area and it’s basketball DNA well. He’s convinced Durant will call the area home again one day and last week made his feelings clear on the topic to a local radio show (courtesy of Dan Steinberg‘s D.C. Sports Bog):

“One interesting thing on this LeBron going back to Cleveland, Durant’s watching that very close,” Williams said on ESPN 980 last week. “He’s seeing the adulation pouring out for LeBron James for coming home. And Durant loves this area. He does. He’s back every summer. He plays at Montrose [Christian] against their high school kids sometimes; he’s out there taking charges. He just loves to play basketball. He’s been over at Maryland, he plays with the players over there. He just wants to play. And these are where his ties are. I know one thing, when his career’s over, I’d be shocked if he didn’t live in this area.”

“I think you go in steps,” Williams later said. “I don’t think [Paul] Pierce comes here unless the Wizards did what they did in the playoffs this year. So now take that a step further. If they do make another really strong playoff run this coming year; now all of a sudden there’s somebody that good that’s out there, they have to look at the Wizards. Because I think all those guys – Durant included – are looking at if I go here, will they be good enough to win a championship? So if the Wizards can show that maybe they’re just missing a Durant to win a championship, I think they have a good chance, I really do.”

Williams also discussed former Maryland women’s assistant David Adkins, a one-time Montrose staffer whose hiring by the Wizards helped set off this latest round of intense speculation.

“I know Davis,” Williams said. “He’s Mr. Workout Man. In other words, he loves doing individual drills with players. He knew Durant from Montrose. … He worked with Greivis Vasquez. And he’s really good at what he does.

As easy as it is to dismiss these thoughts as the musings of wistful Wizards and area hoops fans who want to see a storybook homecoming play out in D.C. the way it did in Cleveland this summer, we’d probably be foolish to ignore this completely. Had someone told you three or four years ago that LeBron would leave town the way he did and then come riding back into town a hero this summer, you’d have called them crazy.

While he remains a cult hero in his native DMV, especially for kids who idolize him, Durant has adapted well to each and every environment he’s been in. He’s just as beloved in Oklahoma City as he is around the country and really around the globe. And he doesn’t appear to be homesick or stuck in the tractor beam that seems to be pulling so many of his peers home.

Durant left home as a teenager and spent a year in college at Texas before being drafted by Seattle and then moving to Oklahoma City when the franchise relocated there. He’s become an integral part of whatever community he’s lived in each and every time.

And who knows what goes on for Durant and the Thunder over the course of the next two seasons. If LeBron’s homecoming doesn’t result in any titles or even a trip to The Finals, the decision will be panned universally outside of Cleveland and Northeast Ohio. A would-be trend could be over before it gets started.

That said, the Wizards, or any other team boasting the hometown connection, would be crazy not to at least dream about and explore the possibilities.

They’ll boast young stars in All-Star point guard John Wall and budding star shooting guard Bradley Beal that would be attractive running mates for any superstar on the championship hunt.

The tug of home could be powerful in 2016.

That daydream could become a reality … one that gives us flashbacks to the summer of 2014.

But in the meantime, Durant and Russell Westbrook have unfinished business in Oklahoma City …

Stern, Mourning, Richmond lead 2014 Naismith Hall of Fame class


VIDEO: The 2014 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame class is announced

From NBA.com staff reports

Former NBA commissoner David Stern is only a few weeks removed from his 30 years on the job, but he’s got a new award for his mantle: Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer.

Stern is joined in the Hall of Fame by two players who were stars in the NBA during the 1990s: ex-Sacramento Kings All-Star Mitch Richmond and former Miami Heat All-Star and Defensive Player of the Year Award winner Alonzo Mourning. That trio leads a 2014 Hall of Fame class that was announced today in Dallas, Texas.

Richmond and Mourning are joined by Richmond’s former Golden State teammate, Sarunas Marciulionis, who was voted in partially on the merits of his play as an international star in the Soviet Union and Lithuania.

Rounding out the class were former Pacers coach and current team broadcaster Bob “Slick” Leonard, the ground-breaking Immaculata University women’s basketball team from 1972-74 and a pair of national championship-winning coaches: ex-University of Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson and former University of Maryland coach Gary Williams.

Honored posthumously are Nate “Sweetwater” Clifton, the first African-American player to sign an NBA contract, and Guy Rodgers, one of the NBA’s first league leaders in assists.

Some other notable award winners Monday afternoon:

  • The Bob Cousy Point Guard of the Year Award (given to the top point guard in men’s college basketball) — UConn’s Shabazz Napier
  • The Nancy Lieberman Point Guard of the Year Award (given to the top point guard in women’s college basketball) — Baylor’s Odyssey Sims
  • The Mannie Jackson Basketball’s Human Spirit Award: Former NBA referee crew chief Bob Delaney and former owner and founder of the Charlotte Bobcats Robert L. Johnson