Posts Tagged ‘Fran Blinebury’

Blogtable: What will Kobe’s legacy be?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Kobe’s place in Top 5 Lakers hierarchy? | What will Kobe’s legacy be? | What was Kobe’s defining moment? | Do you see coaching in Kobe’s future?

VIDEORelive Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan’s career showdowns

> When it’s all said and done, what will the legacy of Kobe Bryant be?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comAt a time when the NBA was wondering “who’s got next?” as it pertained to Michael Jordan, with some such as Allen Iverson, Vince Carter, Grant Hill and Tracy McGrady falling short for various reasons, Kobe Bryant was the real deal. Almost eerily so, in fact, with certain mannerisms, priorities and speech patterns that seemed to mimic Jordan’s a bit too closely. But that’s what the league wanted, that’s what we wanted, and that’s what Bryant gave us, hitting his target like no others. He didn’t surpass the original, but he barged into the conversation, kept Jordan alive through the ongoing comparisons and bridged the gap till LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and Steph Curry came along.

Fran Blinebury, A single-minded, ferocious competitor with a penchant for the dramatic and a fearlessness in the face of any situation. For all the talent and the breathtaking exploits, he’ll also be remembered as a virtuoso talent who could never truly enjoy playing with the rest of the kids.

Scott Howard-Cooper, The rings. Within that, though, as the guy who did it his way no matter what. No matter how many teammates it turned off. No matter how many extra hours of preparation it took. No matter how unpopular he became for a time in Los Angeles. Determination was what made him and what hurt him, but either way it set him apart.

Shaun Powell, That he tried very, very hard to be like Michael Jordan and almost pulled it off. By “almost” I mean in terms of scoring and flair and titles. There’s a clear distinction with regard to greatness and icon status, which Michael has over everybody. Kobe won 5 titles, 2 without Shaq, and was fun to watch. That’s his legacy.

John Schuhmann,  In general, it’s positive. He’s the third leading scorer in NBA history and he has five championships, 17 All-Star selections (and counting), and two gold medals. He had a relentless work ethic and an incredible competitive spirit. But I’ll always wonder if he could have won another championship or two if he had the willingness to trust his teammates and the desire to make them better. Sometimes, that competitive spirit got in his own way.

Sekou Smith, Kobe’s legacy is a mix of defiance (I’m old enough to remember the reaction of many when he donned those shades and announced he was skipping college for the Draft), rip-your-heart-out competitiveness (roll any of his highlights) and, ultimately, triumph (see all five of his championships) and inspiration (see his millions of fans). For an iconic star whose path to stardom was paved in a most unconventional way, Kobe exceeded all expectations. Spending his formative years away from the U.S. always made his story something totally different from his contemporaries. It’s also what gave him the global appeal that has marked his time in the spotlight. He inspired the next generation in the same ways Michael Jordan did for his generation.

Ian Thomsen, At a time when high school draft picks were being criticized for their sense of entitlement, Kobe (not unlike Kevin Garnett) went old-school. He made the most of what he had. He prepared and played as hard as he could until there was nothing more to give.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: Kobe was the greatest player of his generation, as well as the fiercest competitor of his generation, and perhaps the most mentally tough player to ever play the game. Did he shoot too much? Did he not get along with teammates or coaches? Maybe, but in the reflection of history, those things won’t be as important to remember when recalling what made Kobe, Kobe.

Blogtable: Coaching in Kobe’s future?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Kobe’s place in Top 5 Lakers hierarchy? | What will Kobe’s legacy be? | What was Kobe’s defining moment? | Do you see coaching in Kobe’s future?

VIDEOKobe Bryant talks about why he decided to retire after 2015-16

> Now that he announced his retirement, do you see coaching in Kobe’s future? And if not, then what will he do with this free time he has?

Steve Aschburner, Can’t see Kobe as an NBA coach because he seems to burn too hot. It’s also a level or two too removed from the sort of individual mastery that matters so much to him and for which he’s so famous. I could see him as an entrepreneur in the business world not unlike Magic Johnson or delving into entertainment as the driving force of a studio or production house. Or, most of all, really going global in cultivating international markets in apparel, media and other basketball-related enterprises. His candor would be terrific on one of the NBA studio shows, if he could keep it light enough to avoid appearing harsh. Owner of a team? Well, the guy Bryant’s always chased has left sneaker prints in which to follow, if that’s what he craves.

Fran Blinebury, Not a chance. No patience. No tolerance. No empathy. In fact, I’d pity his players. I’m sure he’ll pop up occasionally on TV, but not for a regular talking head gig. A life of royal repose.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Mamba Enterprises. Kobe Inc. His drive does not stop at wanting to take over the basketball world. It’s more likely he owns a team than coaches one. I think most anything is more likely than coaching, actually. But he won’t go away. Bryant will remain a presence.

Shaun Powell, Coaching? No chance in hell. Kobe wouldn’t have the patience for it. I’d love to see him become a basketball ambassador, given his passion for all things international, and buy a piece of the Lakers at some point. Of course a fair amount of people will want him to sit behind a microphone. Kobe will be fine with whatever he decides to do. 

John Schuhmann, I do not see him as a coach, because he doesn’t seem to have the temperament. He’ll likely get into TV and/or radio, because he’s not afraid to speak his mind and people will always want to hear what he has to say.

Sekou Smith, No way can I see Kobe coaching. Not in the NBA or anywhere else. The way he battled his coaches (namely Phil Jackson) … not a chance. Ownership seems more appropriate for a superstar of his ilk.

Ian Thomsen, The example for him to emulate would be Pat Riley. He would surely be willing to prepare and compete like Riley. But would Kobe be interested in relating to players who fall short of his high competitive standard? Riley, as an NBA role player, approached coaching from a different perspective than Kobe would. His career in coaching defined Riley, whereas Kobe already knows who he is and has no need to prove himself.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog I can’t see Kobe as a coach — dealing with the media demands alone would probably be too much. I could see him in a GM/president role, overseeing a franchise and thinking bigger picture. But really, I think he’ll be done with basketball for a while. He’s already set the groundwork for a career in something other than basketball, and knowing what a competitor Kobe is, my guess is he will want to see what kind of success he can have if he pursues a full-time career in the business world.

Blogtable: Kobe’s place among Top 5 Lakers of all-time?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Kobe’s place in Top 5 Lakers hierarchy? | What will Kobe’s legacy be? | What was Kobe’s defining moment? | Do you see coaching in Kobe’s future?

VIDEOKobe Bryant and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar talk on GameTime after a game in 2012

> Where does Kobe rank in your Top 5 Lakers of all-time?

Steve Aschburner, Kobe ranks second on my top-5, all-time Lakers list. And since I give bonus points to those who spent their entire career with the franchise in question, my list is 1) Magic Johnson, 2) Kobe Bryant, 3) Jerry West, 4) Elgin Baylor and 5) Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Kobe’s talents, drive, capabilities and accomplishments are second to none but Magic helped to revive both the Lakers and the league, is the point guard on my by-position all-time NBA team (Kobe is a backup) and remains my word-association response when I hear “Laker.”

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comTwo decades, five rings, 17 All-Star teams. It’s certainly enough to put Kobe into the conversation and I’ll respectfully listen. But Kareem and Magic are at the top of my list. One is the all-time leading NBA scorer with six MVPs and the other was the spark that lit the flame on five championship teams, nine Finals appearances in 12 years and began the modern era of the Lakers as the league’s most dominant franchise. I’ll put him a tie for third with Jerry West.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Second or third. I have always said Jerry West is No. 1 because he was a positive for the organization at most every level, a superstar as a player and executive and good in a brief run as a coach. After that, it’s Kobe and Magic or Magic and Kobe. Years after this question became commonplace, I still don’t know how to split 2 and 2A. Johnson was a great player, a leader and merely had a hand in turning the NBA into a global brand. Their ruthless pursuit of winning is similar. They both had to fit in with other Hall of Famers. There is no wrong answer. After that, Elgin Baylor, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Wilt Chamberlain follow in some order. I would put Wilt a tier below because he only had five seasons with the Lakers. Then it’s a Chamberlain-Shaquille O’Neal debate for the start of the second five.

Shaun Powell, Here’s the order: 1. Magic, 2. Kobe, 3. Kareem, 4. Jerry, 5. George Mikan. I give Kobe the edge on Kareem based on Laker longevity (Kareem started in Milwaukee) and Kobe owns more titles than West, although as players, they rate very close in my opinion. Nobody touches Magic. He’s Mr. Laker.

John Schuhmann, Second, behind Magic Johnson and ahead of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Jerry West and either Elgin Baylor or James Worthy. Longevity puts him ahead of Kareem and West, but I can’t put him ahead of Magic, who also played his entire career in L.A., had a much better winning percentage (.728 vs. .635), and was more of a galvanizing force, for both his teammates and the Lakers’ fanbase.

Sekou Smith, As great as Kobe has been over the course of his career, I’ve always been a believer that Magic Johnson is the all-time iconic Laker, over Kobe, Jerry West, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Shaq and any of their other Hall of Famers. Magic remains No. 1 on my list with Kareem a close second and Kobe third. Being in the top three with two of the greatest five players in NBA history speaks volumes about the legacy Kobe has built during his unbelievable 20-year run in purple and gold.

Ian Thomsen, Kobe and Magic Johnson are tied for first. They can’t be compared directly – head-to-head – because their eras were so different. Some will downgrade Kobe’s first three championships because he had Shaq, but can’t the same be said of Magic’s partnership with Kareem throughout the early 1980s? This is going to make more sense in a few years, when it will be easier to put Bryant’s career into perspective, but for now I don’t feel right choosing between him and Magic.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog Same as I had him last time — I think he’s the second-greatest Laker of all-time. But even if he won a title this season, I don’t know if he would leapfrog Magic Johnson, the greatest Laker in my estimation. (Then again, if Kobe could win a title with this Lakers team, he might be the greatest NBA player of all-time.)

Blogtable: What was Kobe’s defining moment?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Kobe’s place in Top 5 Lakers hierarchy? | What will Kobe’s legacy be? | What was Kobe’s defining moment? | Do you see coaching in Kobe’s future?

VIDEORelive Kobe Bryant’s 81-point game in 3 minutes

> What was Kobe Bryant’s defining moment?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comHe’ll probably get some love here for the championship teams he led in 2009 and 2010 without Shaquille O’Neal sharing the load. Someone might mention his MVP year or even a season in which he arguably should have won it. But to me, it’s the audacity, the brashness and the irrepressibility of his 81 points against Toronto on Jan. 22, 2006. Bryant “went” where only the great Wilt Chamberlain ever had gone, as far as points in a single game, surpassing anything his role model Michael Jordan had done. Bryant might prefer the rings, partly because they’re more politically correct as personal achievements in a team sport, but let’s face it: he was a scorer and only one guy on one night ever did that bigger – and maybe not even better, in shot selection or highlight plays – than Kobe.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comGame 5 of the Western Conference semifinal playoff series against the Utah Jazz in Salt Lake City in 1997. Kobe the rookie fired up airball after airball after airball in the fourth quarter and overtime as the Lakers were eliminated.  And the 18-year-old simply didn’t give a damn and kept right on shooting. That’s who Kobe has been for 20 NBA seasons — not always right, but never unsure.

Scott Howard-Cooper, There are five of them. One on each finger. Choose a hand.

Shaun Powell, If we mean a singular moment, then it’s his 81-point game. In terms of moment on a bit grander and more important scale, then I’d say his fifth championship. That gave him one more than Shaq, one less than Jordan.

John Schuhmann, The fourth quarter of the 2008 Olympic gold medal game. Shaquille O’Neal was the more important player in the Lakers’ three-peat, Bryant’s fourth title came in a lopsided series, and his fifth came with him shooting 6-for-24 in Game 7 against Boston. The gold medal game in Beijing was a do-or-die situation that the U.S. had worked three years to get to and one of the best games I’ve ever seen. After struggling through the first 7 1/2 games of the tournament, Bryant took over late and lived up to his reputation as the game’s best closer.

Sekou Smith, It’s nearly impossible to boil it down to just one. The title and Finals MVP he captured in 2009, his first title sans Shaq, sticks out to me. In order for him to shake the tag of being Shaq’s sidekick on those first three titles, he had to secure his legacy by showing that he could do it without the big fella. Once that was accomplished, he was elevated in the eyes of many. I think it validated all of the things he’d done up to that point and made him the unquestioned best player of his generation.

Ian Thomsen, He is going to be defined by the Lakers’ Game 7 victory over the Celtics in the 2010 NBA Finals. Bryant was injured and shooting poorly and yet he fought to the end, true to his character.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogSo many things come to mind, but when I hear Kobe Bryant, the first thing I think of is Game 7 of the 2000 Western Conference finals, with the series on the line, as Kobe drove the lane, pulled up for a jumper and…dished a perfect alley-oop to Shaq. To me, that play perfectly encapsulated just how great Kobe was, as well as how dangerous a duo those two could be, at least when they wanted to be.

Is Kobe the greatest Laker?

With Kobe Bryant announcing his retirement on Sunday, the string of praises and tributes are starting to pour in. Of course with any great player leaving the game one’s place in history will be debated. In August, we asked our stable of scribes across the globe if Bryant is the greatest Laker of all time. Here are their responses.

VIDEOPlayers around the league show their appreciation for Kobe Bryant

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comOne’s first duty in answering any question of this sort is to be protective of the predecessors, whether it’s a ’68 Mustang supposedly being eclipsed by the 2015 model or in this case, Kobe Bryant elbowing ahead of Jerry West and Magic Johnson. It’s hard to argue against “The Logo,” one of the best and classiest acts in NBA history, but Bryant – with his rings, his stats totals and his MVP trophy – has climbed higher among the game’s notables, which moves him past West as a swell Laker. I’m holding firm on Johnson, though, as the face of that franchise. We can quibble about the “greatest” definition, but Johnson was remarkable as a 6-foot-9 point guard who helped revive both the Lakers and the league with his team play and his smile. He also is my point guard on any by-position all-time team I put together and Bryant is a backup. So that splits my final hair here.

Fran Blinebury, You can put him in the conversation and I’ll listen. But Kareem and Magic are at the top of my list. One is the all-time leading NBA scorer with six MVPs and the other was the spark that lit the flame on five championship teams, nine Finals appearances in 12 years and began the modern era of the Lakers as the league’s most dominant franchise.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Jerry West is. He was a star as a player and a star as a general manager. It would be hard to find anyone who  impacted any organization in any sport so much. West had massive roles in championships on different levels. He coached the team as well. There is no reason to diminish anything Kobe has accomplished. But “The Logo” is the greatest Laker.

Shaun Powell, Magic Johnson is No. 1. Kareem is No. 2 only because he spent a chunk of his prime in Milwaukee. Then Kobe. By giving Kobe the nod over Jerry West and Elgin Baylor speaks plenty about the brilliance of Kobe’s career, because Elgin and Jerry were certainly no slouches (from what I understand; they were before my time). Kobe got buckets, was clutch and raised his game in the post-season. And aside from injuries, he was all that for two decades.

John Schuhmann, He’s clearly on the short list, but I can’t put him ahead of Magic Johnson, who was the most important player on all five championship teams he played on, had one of the three greatest Finals performances of all-time (1980, Game 6), and was obviously more of a galvanizing force for the Lakers, making his teammates better. I’ll always wonder if Kobe could have won more if he trusted his teammates just a little bit more.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comNo. 1? Wow. That’s a tough one. I can’t go there, though, having lived through the Showtime Lakers era and seeing the impact Magic had on not only Lakers fans, but fans everywhere. Kobe’s right up there among the franchise’s greatest players ever, and perhaps even a 1A to Magic, but I can’t give him that No. 1 spot ahead of Magic.

Ian Thomsen, I’m going to say that Kobe rates No. 1, based on his longevity and the fact that he never had so much talent around him as Magic Johnson had in Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, James Worthy, Bob McAdoo, Byron Scott and the rest. Kobe led from a more vulnerable position, in a league that was more competitive top-to-bottom.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: I think he’s top three. To me, the top trio is Kobe, Magic Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. And within that trio, I’d have Kareem third. Magic and Kobe may each have five titles, but when you consider their places in history, Magic came into the NBA at a time when it was struggling, and he helped transform it into the international behemoth it is today. Purely as a basketball player, Kobe may retire with the better career numbers, but being a Laker isn’t only what happens on the court. And in that sense, to me I don’t know if anyone will ever surpass Mag

Davis expected to start for Pelicans

VIDEO: Anthony Davis injures knee on Friday night at the Clippers.

In an already injury-plagued season for the Pelicans, it was a hold-your-breath moment when Anthony Davis had to be helped off the floor with a knee injury Friday night against the Clippers in Los Angeles.

But now the team has listed Davis in the probable starting lineup for Saturday night’s game in Utah.

Pelicans medical staff checked with the All-Star forward after he limped to the bench and did not schedule additional testing. Davis was diagnosed with a bruised right knee as the result of a collision with the Clippers’ Chris Paul in the third quarter. He went to the locker room and did not return to the game.

When the Pelicans released the projected starting lineup for the game with the Jazz, Davis was in his usual spot at power forward along with small forward Alonzo Gee, center Omer Asik and guards Eric Gordon and Jrue Holiday.

The Pelicans’ Tyreke Evans (injured knee) is listed as doubtful.

Report: Okafor involved in previous incident in Philly

Just as the losses keep piling up for the 76ers, so do the off-court incidents involving rookie Jahlil Okafor.

The 19-year-old Okafor, who apologized for his role in a street fight on Wednesday night in Boston, also had a gun pointed at him during a confrontation with two unidentified men in early October in Philadelphia, according to John Gonzalez of

The 19-year-old Sixers’ rookie was outside an Old City nightclub after 2 a.m. on October 4 when he and another person began arguing with two men sitting in a parked car near the corner of 2nd and Walnut Streets, according to a witness. The verbal disagreement escalated and a witness said he saw Okafor try to punch the driver through the open driver’s side window. During the altercation, the driver and passenger exited the car and the passenger pointed a gun in the direction of Okafor and his associate, per the witness.

U.S. Park Rangers — who patrol nearby Independence Hall — arrived on the scene during the altercation, according to separate reports filed by the U.S. Park Rangers and the Philadelphia Police Department and obtained by The man who exited the passenger side of the car fled on foot and appeared to toss his gun, per multiple witnesses. According to the police report, the driver got into a black Camaro with red stripes and sped off. The car was not stopped.

According to the police report, a U.S. Park Ranger chased the unidentified passenger on foot but lost him when the man ducked into the garage at the nearby Sheraton Philadelphia Society Hill Hotel at One Dock Street. The report also indicated that police and K-9 units “swept the parking garage and first floor of the hotel with negative results.” Hotel surveillance video revealed the man never entered the hotel from the garage.

A law enforcement source told that a gun magazine was recovered near the scene and submitted for fingerprint analysis. The law enforcement source said the investigation is ongoing.

It is unclear what happened to Okafor or his associate after the incident or if they were interviewed by U.S. Park Rangers or PPD.

“We are aware that there is an ongoing investigation regarding the alleged incident and are unable to comment further,” a Sixers’ spokesman said.

Reports: Sixers rookie Okafor in street fight

The 76ers battled the Celtics down to the wire Wednesday before dropping to 0-16 on the season and running their overall losing streak to a record-tying 26 in a row.

Now TMZ has posted a video they say is of Sixers rookie Jahlil Okafor punching a man outside of a bar in Boston who had shouted “76ers suck:”

Okafor says he was being heckled from the moment he left the club and felt threatened because people swarmed him on the street.

He says he was with a teammate — who he wouldn’t name — and says someone got physical with the teammate … so Jahlil did what he felt he needed to do to protect himself and his friend.

ESPN’s Jeff Goodman confirmed the story.

The Sixers released a statement on the incident.

“We are aware of the report and we are currently working to gather additional information. Until that time, we will have no further comment.”


Scott won’t cut Kobe’s minutes

VIDEO: Byron Scott addresses media following Wednesday’s practice

The hole keeps getting deeper for Kobe Bryant and the Lakers. But coach Byron Scott is intent on letting the 20-year veteran dig his own way out.

Even after a second 1-for-14 shooting effort of the season — the worst of his career — in the dismal 111-77 loss to the unbeaten Warriors the last time out, Scott told Baxter Holmes of that he does not plan to reduce Bryant’s minutes or his prominence in the lineup.

“I haven’t thought about reducing his role,” Scott said Wednesday at the team’s practice facility. “I think his role is pretty defined for us right now. So is his minutes.”

In spite of Kobe Bryant’s 1-for-14 shooting malaise in Tuesday’s rout by the Warriors, coach Byron Scott said Wednesday he hasn’t considered reducing the 37-year-old’s “pretty defined” role.

Bryant, 37, is struggling mightily in his 20th NBA season, during which he’s averaging more shots (a team-high 16.4 field goal attempts per game) than points (15.2). Bryant is second on the team in minutes (30.5) to Jordan Clarkson (30.8).

Scott said he doesn’t believe minutes are taking a toll on Bryant, whose past three seasons have all been cut short by injury.
“Maybe it is, but my opinion, watching him, I don’t think so,” Scott said.

Scott also said he’s not counseling Bryant.

“I’m letting him try to find it for himself,” Scott said. “He’s been doing this for a long time. I’m not so much worried about Kobe. I am concerned about his shooting percentage and shots so far, but so far as knowing him the way I’ve known him and how long he’s played in this league, I’m not worried about him finding it.”

Blogtable: Thoughts on Budenholzer’s fine?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Slowing the Warriors? | On Budenholzer’s fine … | What you’re thankful for this season

VIDEOMike Budenholzer gets ejected from the Hawks’ game in Cleveland

> Atlanta’s Mike Budenholzer was fined $25,000 for making contact with an official. Was this punishment too much, not enough, or just right?

Steve Aschburner, Not enough. When the established penalty for physical contact with a referee is suspension – from Gregg Popovich‘s one game for bumping Bob Delaney in 1993 to Jerry Sloan‘s seven games for a run-in with Courtney Kirkland in 2003 – it’s recklessly light to only ding Budenholzer’s paycheck. The Hawks coach might come across like straight-arrow Richie Cunningham from “Happy Days”, but on NBA sidelines he can become a fire-breathing, competitive madman same as his 29 colleagues. Mostly it’s a tough precedent for new NBA top cop Kiki Vandeweghe. What happens when it’s a player next time? Or when another coach does it with a little more force? Physical stuff with refs is a line that can’t be crossed, no matter how incidental or innocent it seems. We all remember Jason Kidd‘s accidental spilled soft drink on the sideline too. Uh huh.

Fran Blinebury, I’d say it was about right. The bump may have been unintentional, but the message has to be sent that no coach can be out on the court protesting to put himself in that position. Bud has apologized to referee Ben Taylor, so you move on.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Not nearly enough if there was an intentional bump, but enough if the contact was incidental. The NBA ruled it incidental. While not touching an official is normally a rule without blurry lines, and understandably so, players and coaches can make unintentional contact. People lose their balance or trip. Coaches do too.

Shaun Powell, The punishment was right, because he made contact, but he only got one technical. As for the big picture, coaches do take liberties with their spot on the floor. Far too often, they take a step or two onto the court to call a play or chastise a ref and are rarely punished. I love the old line by John Wooden: “Show me a coach who feels the need to stand and yell the whole game, and I’ll show you a team that’s not prepared.”

John Schuhmann, NBA.comJust right. Budenholzer has to be accountable for his actions, and there’s too much complaining about officiating in the league. The immediate ejection was the right call, but the bump wasn’t malicious enough that it deserved another game away from the bench.

Sekou Smith, Just right. Perhaps it will remind some of the coaches around the league that all the bellyaching in the world does not change anything and only serves to infuriate the officials, bore the true fans of the game and take away from the beauty of a night at an arena. The whole routine has long been the theater of the absurd, if you ask me. And if it a team (like the Clippers) is not careful, fair or not, they develop an identity as a bunch of whiners. I understand barking at an official now and then. And I know there are times when a coach earns a technical foul for the greater good. But going overboard, even inadvertently, is a waste of time and costs good money.

Ian Thomsen, It was far too little. This should be a no-go, don’t-even-think-about-it area. Referees are right to be concerned by the precedent.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogThe punishment was just. While I’m sure he would never say so publicly, my guess is that Coach Bud would probably privately concede that the collision was in at least some part born out of frustration. And I understand why: No other team has played as many games as the Hawks thus far. Commissioner Adam Silver may have managed to eliminate a lot of four games in five days stretches across the NBA schedule, but the Hawks have already had one four-in-five and are started their second four-in-five last night. The schedule will even out at some point, sure, but right now, even this early on, the Atlanta Hawks could use a break.