Posts Tagged ‘Fran Blinebury’

Rockets could miss the pest of Beverley


VIDEO: Rockets GM Daryl Morley makes a bold prediction

A few weeks ago when the Rockets brought members of their 1994 and ’95 back-to-back championship teams into town for a 20-year reunion, Vernon Maxwell’s chest burst with pride and his eyes lit up with glee at the memories of rattling opponents in head-to-head confrontations.

“Get under their skin, baby,” said Mad Max. “You do that and you got more than half the battle won.”

When the Rockets announced Monday that point guard Patrick Beverley would undergo surgery to repair torn ligaments in his left wrist and be lost for the season, the general reaction around the league was that the Rockets could press on and survive without him. General manager Daryl Morey even went so far as to say in an ESPN radio interview that the Rockets could win the NBA championship without Beverley.

Indeed, as pieces of the starting lineup go, Beverley’s skills as a point guard are the most replaceable. The Rockets will go with the veteran tandem of Jason Terry and Pablo Prigioni and by the numbers won’t suffer a drop-off. In fact, entering Monday’s game at Toronto, the Rockets are 9-0 this season with Terry in the starting lineup. The numbers also say Rockets are seven points better per 100 possessions with Beverley off the court and James Harden than they are when the two starters play together.

Beverley, of course, is not the kind of offensive force at his position that many other Western Conference contenders possess — no Stephen Curry or Chris Paul or Russell Westbrook or Damian Lillard or Tony Parker or Monta Ellis or Mike Conley. Beverley’s numbers are even down from the past two seasons. He’s shooting just 38.3 percent from the field and his PER of 11.4 is the lowest in three NBA seasons.

The Rockets’ offense thrives in the fourth quarter because they put the ball in the hands of the MVP candidate Harden and let him make the decisions and make the plays.

So there are legitimate reasons why the Rockets might not miss an offensive beat without Beverley in the playoffs.

But then there is the defensive end, where Beverley has staked his claim and earned his very place in the NBA. He’s tough, he’s rugged, he’s physical, he’s aggressive to the extreme, maybe even a little dirty. And there’s nothing at all wrong with that. Not in the playoffs. Not where every slightest edge can make a difference.

Two years ago Beverley’s aggression took Westbrook out of the playoffs. While OKC won the first-round series, it derailed the Thunder’s title hopes. Now in virtually any round and any matchup, the Rockets could face a team — Golden State, Portland, San Antonio — where the point guard is the primary scorer that makes the offense go.

There are times when having an utter nuisance in your lineup can make a difference.

Ask Westbrook. Ask Mad Max.

Getting under their skin is a valuable talent, too, baby.

Blogtable: Worried about Hawks?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Remembering Nash’s career | Next moves for Thunder? | Worried about Hawks?



VIDEOHow the Spurs diced up the Hawks in Atlanta

> The Hawks have lost three in a row for the first time all season. Is this team simply in neutral, coasting to the finish line, or have the Hawks run out of gas?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Some of the Hawks’ remarkable achievements have caught up with them, in terms of trying to maintain such excellence so long (think Indiana last season), and some of what befalls any NBA team has been in play too. As in injuries to Kyle Korver and Mike Scott. Once a lot of us in the media started saying, “Yeah, we’re convinced now that Atlanta is good. But let’s see what happens in the postseason…,” it seemed only fair that the Hawks might embrace a little of that attitude, too.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI’ll go with neither. The Hawks are hardly coasting and I don’t believe they’ve hit the wall. It’s a long, long season and virtually every team goes through some kind of funk. But I’m thinking that by the time the playoffs start in three weeks, the Hawks will have rediscovered their Uptown Funk and gon’ give it to you.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comFirst of all, the losses were to the Warriors and Spurs (plus also the Thunder with Russell Westbrook getting a triple-double). Secondly, it’s was three games. So, no. I’m not seeing running out of gas yet. I’m not seeing coasting either. If this continues for a couple weeks, if the Hawks start falling over face first against Orlando, Charlotte and Detroit within the next five games, then we’ll have something to talk about. Right now, it’s nothing beyond the same tough stretch every team navigates.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comLook, the Hawks simply couldn’t play any better than they did from December through February. Eventually, a slide was coming; the only question was how much? It’s tough to place a sense or urgency on their latest performance only because we’re in the dog days. I trust Al Horford will snap out of it as well as the Hawks once the games take on a greatest sense of importance. That said: Cleveland and LeBron are the favorites coming out of the East, and I thought that way even at the height of Hawksmania.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThey lost to the Warriors, Thunder and Spurs, and they were missing Kyle Korver in the first two games. Questions about how well their defense (which has been really bad in the three games) will hold up in the playoffs are legit, but it’s not time to panic just yet.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com They are certainly not out of gas. And you don’t win 55 games with a month left in the season coasting or stuck in neutral. The Hawks simply ran into that tough stretch of the season where you get exposed a bit. It’s nothing that cannot be cured with some intensive film study, a little introspection and the return to health of several key players who have dealt with injury concerns since the All-Star break. Beyond that, there is nothing to see here folks … until the playoffs get underway.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThere is no shame in losing at Golden State and OKC or at home to the Spurs. And there was no way for the Hawks to maintain their high level of efficiency all season long — as the Warriors have also discovered recently. This little dip should have no bearing on the playoffs, when the Hawks’ success will be defined by the matchups.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Oh, so here it comes. All Atlanta fans knew this was in the cards, because no matter how great things are going, this is how it always ends for Atlanta sports teams — in disaster and sadness and disappointment and despair. Except maybe not this time? Because even though the Hawks have lost three in a row, I’m not ready to count them out just yet. They’ve been without Kyle Korver, Mike Scott and Thabo Sefolosha, three of their best eight players. If anything, their absence has highlighted how important having a full complement of players is for this team. It’s not any one guy, it’s not the four All-Stars, the Atlanta Hawks are a team where guys one through 15 each matter.

Blogtable: Next moves for Durant, Thunder?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Remembering Nash’s career | Next moves for Thunder? | Worried about Hawks?



VIDEOIs a playoff push a wise idea for OKC?

> The Thunder have removed Kevin Durant from basketball-related activities and say he is out indefinitely, still bothered by the injury to his right foot. What does this latest setback mean for Durant? For the Thunder?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I think Durant’s extended absence means OKC is not a top threat to emerge from the killer Western Conference this spring, if it makes the postseason at all. That team has shifted and adapted too much – to injuries and to Russell Westbrook-palooza – to reconfigure itself on the fly for an extended playoff run. It also means everything will be on the line in 2015-16 for the Thunder as that franchise takes its last big shot at a championship before Durant hits free agency.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: It means that Durant should temper thoughts of macho heroics and take the longer view of his career. If he can return for the playoffs without doing further damage, fine. But if it’s a risk, starting planning for training camp in October. That goes squared for Thunder management. Heading into the last year of his contract next season, it’s all about the personal connection between Durant and the franchise and GM Sam Presti knows that.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: That it’s probably time to think about next season. We won’t know for sure until the medical bulletins just before the playoffs, but if the Thunder can’t even set a timetable when he will be back, the latest problem is a significant setback. Get him in a good place for the start of 2015-16. One-hundred percent, with no uncertainty. As much as Russell Westbrook is playing in another stratosphere right now, chances are slim that OKC could make a long run with Durant having little or no prep time before the postseason, along with the other injury concerns. If there is any doubt about the ability of the first to hold up through a series or two this spring, focus on the big picture.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I always thought this was a lost year for OKC anyway, based only on karma. Something always seemed to go wrong for OKC and, specifically, Westbrook and Durant, in terms of health. Even if Durant hadn’t suffered this latest setback, the Thunder would’ve faced a tough first-round matchup with the Warriors. In the short term, his injury hurts, obviously. In the long-term, unless the injury is chronic, I can’t see why OKC can’t return to normal right away.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Both parties need to prioritize the future over this season, which will, at best, finish in a first round defeat at the hands of the best team (statistically) since the 1995-96 Bulls. And that means that they need to have a conversation about Durant’s future. He’s got one more year on his contract, and if he has plans to leave, his team needs to know about them now.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: It means Durant should begin his offseason program now rather than weeks from now if and when the Thunder are eliminated from the playoffs. Now is not the time for Durant to take foolish risks with his body, not after all of the peculiar injury issues that have gone on around the league this season. For the Thunder it means you trudge on for the remainder of this season with Mr. Triple-Double himself, Russell Westbrook, creating chaos for the opposition. Any dreams of an upset in the playoffs seem to be just that, dreaming.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comIf healthy and whole, I’d been thinking they could win the championship from the No. 8 seed. What Durant’s continuing absence means is more speculation than ever about his free agency in 2016, most of it premature and unfounded. The reality is that OKC still has Russell Westbrook, who is going to be focused on the here-and-now of trying to upset Golden State – and who’s to say that he can’t, with nothing to lose and the Warriors carrying so much pressure as the heavy favorite?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: For Durant, it means he needs to sit down and get healthy before he even starts thinking about returning. Durant is crucial to the Thunder’s attack, but that means not just this season, but for as long as Durant is wearing a Thunder uniform. For the Thunder, I just hope they resist any urge to hurry Durant back. I know the summer of 2016 looms large on the horizon, but to me, the best sales pitch to get Durant to re-sign is to put together a championship team. And there is no way that winning a title in Oklahoma City doesn’t involve a healthy Kevin Durant.

Blogtable: Remembering Nash’s career

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Remembering Nash’s career | Next moves for Thunder? | Worried about Hawks?



VIDEO: How did Steve Nash affect the modern NBA game?

> He was the master of the pick-and-roll, the NBA’s assists leader five times in seven years, a two-time MVP, an eight-time All-Star, a 90 percent free-throw shooter … What will you remember most about Steve Nash’s career?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I’ll remember Nash as the Wayne Gretzky of the NBA. Not in terms of total dominance or mountainous statistics but in terms of his wizardry with the ball. Most notably, the way he would dribble down to the baseline, beneath the basket — like Gretzky working from behind the net — and out to find something even better than he might have initially conceived. It was the sense that Nash played chess while other NBA players were mastering checkers. The fact that Nash also is Canadian was just a coincidence for me.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: That for all the fancy passing and graceful floating shots, he was tougher than year-old beef jerky. I’ll always remember Game 1 of the 2007 playoff series against the Spurs when Nash’s bloody, raw, cut-open nose looked like it had gone 12 rounds with Mike Tyson and he stayed in the game to put up 31 points and eight rebounds.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: That he was a textbook. Want to see how a point guard is supposed to look on offense? Watch Steve Nash. He could play fast, he could play halfcourt. He could shoot, he could pass. He was always a good leader by example, dedicated to getting better and keeping his body in a good place, until Father Time finally ran him down, and later in his career seemed to assert himself more as a vocal leader in the locker room. Nash was not at the same level as the likes of John Stockton and Gary Payton among point guards from around the same era because they defended as well, but he should be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I’ll remember Nash for triggering the most entertaining style of basketball since the Showtime Lakers. The Suns were pure joy, must-watch TV, and rarely delivered a dud. It was mainly because of Nash and his ability to thrive in the open court and spot teammates and pull up for jumpers. The only point guard to come close since then is Steph Curry. I guess I should remember the two MVPs but those were somewhat controversial. Anyway, Nash was a personal favorite and as a bonus, a total class act.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: That Nash teams led the league in offensive efficiency for nine straight seasons, with him shooting 49.7 percent from the field, 43.9 percent from 3-point range and 91.0 percent from the line, tells me that he’s one of the greatest offensive players in NBA history. That streak includes a season when Amar’e Stoudemire played three games and another season-plus when Shaquille O’Neal supposedely bogged down the offense. Along with Suns coach Mike D’Antoni, Nash changed the way the game is played. And with his shooting, vision, creativity and unselfishness, he’s the prototype for the modern-day, pick-and-roll point guard.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Nash helped revolutionize the game as we see it now, ushering in the up-tempo style that has morphed into the pace-and-space game that has become the rage in the NBA. He did it by being a traditional point guard in the truest sense of the words, excelling as a facilitator with flair the likes of which we hadn’t seen since Magic Johnson. And, Nash was a shooter extraordinaire at the same time. My appreciation for his game increases as time passes and we continue to see point guard play evolve into the mold Nash helped create for the modern point guard. The fact that he’s one of the genuinely great guys in the history of sports certainly makes it easier to appreciate him even more in hindsight. The telltale for me is when you ask those who have worked in the same uniform with him over the years who is their favorite teammate of all time? Nash wins unanimously.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: He brought flair to the game. In an era when the NBA was being overrun by young dunkers who didn’t know how to play for the sake of the team, Nash elevated his teams by way of his skills, creativity and cleverness. He was the thinking man’s star, and he influenced the generation of Chris Paul, Stephen Curry, Rajon Rondo and others as the NBA became a point-guard league.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Actually, the thing I will recall the most is none of that stuff. Back in 2001, I spent a summer day with Nash in Toronto while working on a profile for SLAM magazine. He had a few media appearances to make, so we walked around the city, talking about everything from basketball to soccer to politics to music. He got recognized a few times, but for the most part people left us alone. A few years later, after Nash had bounced from Dallas to Phoenix and redefined the point guard position, we met up in Toronto again. By now, Nash was one of the best players in the NBA and a Canadian icon. The low profile may have been out the window, but Nash was the same regular guy, an unassuming kid from Western Canada who through hard work and will made himself into one of the greatest players in basketball history.

Westbrook loses his triple-double


VIDEO: Westbrooks’ notable night is now 12, 17, 9

It turns out there is one way to slow down the triple-double machine that has been Russell Westbrook lately. But it took a ruling by the NBA office to do it.

A video review of the game resulted in the league subtracting one rebound from Westbrook’s total from Sunday’s win over Miami, thus wiping out what would have been the Oklahoma City All-Star’s 10th triple-double of the season.

The league said that Westbrook was incorrectly credited with a rebound in the 93-75 victory. The correction means the Thunder point guard finished with 12 points, 17 assists and nine rebounds.

Westbrook now has nine triple-doubles on the season for an Oklahoma City team that at 40-30 entered Monday night with a 2½-game lead for the eighth spot in the Western Conference playoff picture.

Collapsed Lung Sidelines Rockets’ Jones Indefinitely

The Rockets believe that if they can ever get all of their big men healthy and on the court together, they could make big noise in the rapidly approaching playoffs.

But the latest sound out of Houston is another loud thud with the news that power forward Terrence Jones will be sidelined indefinitely with a collapsed lung. According to Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle, Jones will be out indefinitely after suffering his latest injury Thursday night against the Nuggets.

Jones had previously missed 43 games this season, 41 of them due to a nerve inflammation that threatened his career. The Rockets have played the last 24 games without star center Dwight Howard, who has been recovering from a painful swelling in his right knee.

“Guys have to step up,” Rockets coach Kevin McHale said. “I sure wish Kostas (Papanikolaou, who has been out for 13 games with a sprained ankle) was ready to play, but he’s not ready to play, either. We just have to deal with it and go.

“We’ll play smaller more. That’s the bottom line, but we’ve played small some. Joey’s going to have to be really on point. Joey (Dorsey) is going to have to play and bang against the bigger guys and we’re going to have to get Josh (Smith) play more minutes, of course. And D-Mo (Donatas Motiejunas) is going to have a big load. And James has been good at guarding a lot of post guys down there, very strong. We’ll have to double team more in the post. We’ll have to make it work.”

The Rockets play at home against Phoenix on Saturday before leaving on a five-game road trip to Indiana, New Orleans, Minnesota, Washington and Toronto.

Pippen recalls MJ’s return

Think back to 20 years ago and so many of our now commonly used words that didn’t exist yet:

— Blog.

— Google.

— Mashup.

— Bromance.

Then think back to exactly 20 years ago today and two of the most famous words ever uttered in sports:

“I’m back.”

With that short, sweet phrase, Michael Jordan shocked the world by coming out of retirement to return to NBA. Two decades later, teammate Scottie Pippen took to Twitter — another word that hadn’t yet been invented — to provide some insight into the impact on the Bulls.

Even Pippen didn’t think it would ever happen.

After three straight titles, the 1993-94 season was a dramatic change for those left behind.

While the rest of the Bulls tried to carry on with him, Pippen admits to keeping one eye on the baseball diamond.

But they all knew things had changed when Jordan put down his glove and bat and started hanging around the gym again.

Then came maybe the most famous fax in history:

It was odd to see him wearing jersey No. 45 instead of his old No. 23. But he looked like his old familiar self as soon as he walked back into Madison Square Garden for the first time.

They made it back to the Eastern Conference finals, but didn’t have enough to get past Shaq and Penny.

But that just lit the flame under Jordan and with the addition of another colorful Hall of Famer, it was just like old times.

It all added up to a word that had been invented just a decade earlier — another “three-peat.”

Young Has Small Knee Fracture

The end of the season can’t come soon enough for the Lakers, who learned Wednesday that guard Nick Young has a small fracture in his left knee cap and will be re-evaluated on a weekly basis.

Young hopes he will not need surgery and that the fracture will heal with rest. According to Arash Markazi of ESPNLosAngeles.com, it’s uncertain if Young will play again this season:

Young has missed the last 11 games with a swollen left knee and has no played since the Lakers beat the Boston Celtics 118-111 on Feb. 22.

“Nothing,” Lakers coach Byron Scott said when asked what Young was able to do at practice. “He signed some autographs, went back in and got some treatment and that was about it.”

Young is averaging 13.4 points and 2.3 rebounds in 23.8 minutes over 42 games this season.

Young did not practice on Wednesday but was sporting a new hairstyle he said was inspired by Kid ‘n’ Play and Jamie Foxx.

“I felt like it was time for a change,” Young said. “I was watching Kid ‘n’ Play at home and then I started watching Booty Call and I said Jamie Foxx has a nice hairstyle I want to try so that’s the inspiration behind it.”

Scott wasn’t a fan of the hairdo, saying it looked like Young lost a bet.

“It looked like a bunch of worms up there just running around,” Scott said. “When I first saw him I started cracking up, laughing.”

Howard will return with restrictions


VIDEO: The Rockets didn’t fold without Howard

The Dwight Howard watch won’t go on for much longer, according to the man himself.

But while the Rockets center says he’s looking to getting back onto the court soon, it will come with some restrictions. Howard said he won’t play more than 20 to 25 minutes until he plays his way back into game shape after missing the past 23 games with a swelling in his right knee. He also won’t play in back-to-back games.

The Rockets have three sets of back-to-back games left on their schedule, the next coming March 29-30 at Washington and Toronto.

“It sucks being injured and trying to come back from an injury,” Howard told reporters following Wednesday’s team workout. “When people see you they say, ‘Oh he looks good,’ and sometimes they don’t understand the whole process. I’m happy the rehab process is almost over with and I can get back on the floor and join my team.”

Howard took part in his first full practice with his teammates in nearly two months on Monday, but has taken the last two days off for rest and treatment. He said there is no pain in the knee, just achiness.

The goal is to be healthy and fully ready for the playoffs, which begin on the weekend of April 18-19.

“I will be back when I feel I am in the best shape but also my body is healthy enough to play and maintain myself,” Howard said. “I know a lot of people want me to play and I want me to play as badly as anybody but the important thing is to make sure this doesn’t happen again because we want to make a deep push in the playoffs this year and I can’t afford to  miss any playoff games.”

Howard is averaging 16.3 points, 11 rebounds and 1.4 blocked shots in 32 games this season, all equaling his lowest numbers in at least nine years, and has not played since Jan. 23.

Blogtable: The rest issue …

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Kyrie’s 57 or Klay’s 37? | The rest issue … | Brighter future: Knicks or Lakers?



VIDEOThe Starters address the issue of resting players

> It’s a trend now, resting players who are healthy and able to play. Sure, coaches should do what’s best for their team. And yes, fans deserve to see the best players. So what can be done about this, moving forward?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Wait, don’t you know I’m sitting out this “blogtable” question? Two out of three on any given day is a hectic pace and I’m tuckered … OK, here are four suggestions, any of which I’ll happily take credit for if implemented: First, cut the preseason down by 10 days (four tune-up games are plenty) so the regular season can start earlier, sprinkling those days into what used to be four-in-five-night grinds. Second, encourage teams to lighten players’ loads on practice days, travel days and off days. Third, let coaches know that shorter minutes in more games is preferable to zero minutes in some; ticket buyers ought to have a fair chance of seeing both teams’ stars play, say, 24 minutes. And fourth, if all these rest provisions are adopted, mandate that marquee players will play in marquee games (i.e., TNT, ABC and ESPN dates). Those are the nights the NBA sells itself to casual fans and broadens its appeal.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Until both sides — owners and players —  come together for the good of player health and the quality of the game and sacrifice a slice of the gobs of money they take in to play a reduced schedule of, say, 66 to 72 games, everything else is just hot air. The solution is simple. But billionaires and millionaires won’t give up a dollar, which is why all we get is yammering and lineups that should make the league ashamed.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com Nothing. It’s just a new fact of life. Not a good one once lottery-bound teams start sitting players to make sure they are rested for the offseason, compared to the understandable reason of wanting to be ready for the postseason, but I don’t think anything can be done. I’d love to hear the suggestions. Any attempted clampdown would merely encourage coaches to perfect stretching the truth. “My starting center woke up with a sore back. Prove me wrong. By the way, my starting point guard stayed home because of some pressing personal business that needed his full attention. Call his wife if you don’t believe me.” It creates more problems than it solves.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com If coaches want to rest players, fine, I guess that’s accepted nowadays. But pulling a Steve Kerr and sitting four-fifths of your starting lineup is over the top. Stop the madness at that point. What’s really weird is players, this deep into the season, rarely if ever practice. Which means they get days off and nights off? Klay Thompson is 25 and healthy and he needs a breather? You can’t put a player out there for at least 15 minutes? Have some respect for the game, at least, and confine your “rest” to one starter per night, if you must. And Adam Silver, please trim the schedule to 75 games, dump the preseason altogether, return to best-of-five for the first round … and convince the owners that less games and revenue is better for the sport (good luck with that one).

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: It really sucks for fans who bought tickets to that particular game to see those particular players. If I lived in Denver and bought tickets for last Friday’s game against Golden State because my kid was a big Stephen Curry fan, I’d be pretty ticked that Stephen Curry didn’t play. Maybe the league can allow fans to exchange those tickets for another game. But resting players will continue to be a smart strategy for good teams who are thinking about the big picture, unless the season is shortened. Fewer games (72 has always been my suggestion) would both allow for more rest and make each game more important.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: A heavy-handed approach will only make things worse. No coach wants to be told how to manage his team. So the league should stay above that fray and institute some general guidelines for resting players who don’t have significant injuries. You want an age limit? How about no one under the age of 30 gets a night off for rest? I could operate on four hours of sleep for six days before my 30th birthday. Rest later, when you are old and cranky. No rest for players on losing teams, never … EVER! And if the integrity of the game means anything, these teams with the blatant maintenance programs must go back to the camouflage of the “sore back” and “tendinitis” as the serial excuses for guys missing games.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: More efficient scheduling can help reduce the wear on players. But I believe this trend of resting players is to be encouraged, actually, because it shows fans that the heart is in the right place — that teams are more concerned with winning games and contending for championships than they are focused on the negative business impact. Isn’t this what fans want — for winning to come first?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: The only way coaches will be convinced to stop sitting guys is if somehow they realize that sitting these guys, for whatever reason, isn’t what is best for their team. What it reminds me of, to be honest, is the way the Atlanta Braves used to handle resting their players during the stretch run. They’d qualify for the postseason with weeks left, rest guys the last few weeks of the season, then hit the postseason with a roster full of guys who were out of sync and out of rhythm. Resting and focusing on preventative maintenance is great, in theory. But you can’t turn the magic on and off.