Posts Tagged ‘Fran Blinebury’

Warriors’ rest will pay over long run


Video: Stephen Curry leads Golden State to a Game 4 win and the sweep

Steve Kerr had a thought about a well-deserved reward for surviving and sweeping his first NBA playoff series as a head coach.

“I’m going to Cabo, and I won’t see them until Saturday,” said the guy who has likely never been suntanned in his life. “I’ll just tell them to get some rest, come and work whenever they feel like it.”

Kerr waited a beat, then remembered he lives in the age of Twitter and missed context and added, “I’m just kidding, of course.”

However, as the first team to close out its first-round series and a schedule that will not have them opening the conference semifinals against the Grizzlies or Trail Blazers until Sunday at the earliest, the Warriors do face the question of how to spend their time off.

“It’s nice to get a couple of days and get some rest,” said center Andrew Bogut. “Guys are banged up, so it’s good to have a chance to regroup. On the flip side, it’s not always a great thing either because sometimes a team can come out a bit flat in Game 1.

“We want to get some rest. We have some smaller guys on our team who could do with some extra time off. You don’t want to play any extra games if you don’t have to.

“But you’ve got to be careful. You don’t want to lull yourself to sleep either. You want to keep doing what we’re doing. To get a day or two off now and then get back at it.”

Guard Klay Thompson came down emphatically on the side of the Warriors getting off their feet, at least for a few days.

“That’s why it’s important to close out a series as soon as you can, get the sweep, if possible,” Thompson said. “This time of year it starts to be a grind. So to have these days off … it will be important for us down the line, if we go as far as we want, to be able to have some energy stored up. It’s why you play all season to have the best record and get the advantages that come with it. You want to jump on teams right away, finish them off the first chance you get and the move on.”

Kerr, who could lie on the beach at Cabo and only turn various shades of lobster pink and orange, knows the Warriors will find the balance.

“I went through this as a player quite often where you have a long, extended break and there’s a mix of rest and reps and scrimmaging,” he said. “You gotta keep your conditioning, but you also want to get your rest as well. We’ll get it figured out.”

The key is to rest whenever you can, because the long march to a championship is never a day at the beach.

Green not defensive about award loss

NEW ORLEANS — Draymond Green figures if a guy can get the most votes and not wind up as the leader of the free world, what right does he have to complain?

The Warriors’ versatile forward and attack dog was philosophical about finishing second to San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard for the Kia Defensive Player of the Year balloting, even though he actually received more first-place votes.

“That’s not the end of the world,” Green said at the Warriors Thursday shootaround prior to Game 3 of the playoffs against the Pelicans. “Al Gore won the popular vote and didn’t get elected president, so I’m not gonna sit here and kill myself over not winning Defensive Player of the Year. We’ve got a bigger goal. That’s to win a championship.”

Green, in fact, was magnanimous in his praise of Leonard.

“Congratulations to Kawhi,” he said. “He’s a great defender. Phenomenal defender. He impacts the defensive end just as good as anybody in the league. So congratulations to him.

“Kawhi is what we all strive to be. He’s a champion. So you can’t sit here and beat yourself up or worry about what happened. He’s a champion. How can anybody complain about that?

“Disappointed? Yeah … but to be angry? That man’s a champion and we all strive to be that. You can’t knock that. He’s done that at the highest level. He’s helped carry his team to a championship on the defensive end.”

Collectively, the Warriors expressed more shock that Green was left entirely off the ballot by nearly one-third of the 129 voting members of the media. He was not listed first, second or third on 42 ballots.

“Obviously, we’re disappointed he didn’t win,” said Warriors coach Steve Kerr. “You can’t argue with Kawhi winning. He’s a great player. My only real disappointment is someone just told me that like 20 people left Draymond off the ballot entirely. That’s a little tough to swallow.

“I can understand giving your first-place vote to someone else. But for what Draymond has meant to us this year. We have the No. 1 rated defense in the league, the way the game is played, where you have to guard everybody, that’s what Draymond does. He was the focal point of our defense. So I don’t know how you couldn’t have voted him third, but that’s the way it goes.”

Teammate Stephen Curry agreed.

“Draymond being so close to getting that award, I don’t know how you leave him off the ballot entirely,” he said. “To go through the season and see how we play and his impact on the game and for him not to be on pretty much everybody’s ballot somewhere one, two or three is pretty crazy to me.”

With center Andrew Bogut finishing sixth in the voting, the Warriors did get recognition that they’re about much more than simply firing up 3-pointers.

“I think people who follow the league closely are well aware that defense is really the key to our team and fuels our offense. Bogues had a tremendous season and he’s continued to shine in the playoffs. His rim protection and intelligence with all of coverages, calling out schemes, he’s been really great.”

Green said losing out on the award will not add to his motivation on the court.

“I’m a motivated guy already,” he said. “I don’t need little jabs to motivate me. If anything else motivates me, it’s gonna motivate me the wrong way and then I’ll be too excited, too fired up. I don’t need anymore motivation. I go out here and play basketball, try to win the series and try to move on to the next round. That’s been the goal since Day One.

“I didn’t come into the season with the goal to win Defensive Player of the Year. It would have been great. I’m not gonna sit here and lie and say it wouldn’t have. It definitely would have. But at the end of the day, the goal that I came into the season with is still alive and that’s the most important thing.”


VIDEO: Spurs’ Leonard named Kia Defensive Player of the Year

Pelicans need Anderson to step up


VIDEO: Ryan Anderson talks after Wednesday’s practice

NEW ORLEANS — The Pelicans are counting on their young star Anthony Davis to build on his scant two games of playoff experience to get them back into their first-round series against the Warriors.

The Pelicans are counting on getting an emotional lift from a sellout home crowd at the Smoothie King Center — the first playoff game in New Orleans in four years — to help close the gap in a 2-0 series that has been closer than expected.

The No. 8 seed in the Western Conference will have to count on a much bigger impact from Ryan Anderson to have any real hope of knocking off the No. 1 overall seed of the playoffs.

In the first two games of the series, the Pelicans have not received the boost off the bench that can make a difference from Anderson’s perimeter scoring ability. He’s shot just 2-for-11 for a total of seven points so far in the series, which continues the struggles since returning from a sprained MCL in his right knee that forced Anderson to miss 18 games late in the season.

“I feel like I am and I can be a big scoring threat,” Anderson told the media following Wednesday’s practice. “It has been tough for me to find a rhythm coming back from the knee injury, but that’s no excuse.

Though they’ve been largely unsuccessful in slowing down the whirlwind talent of Davis, the Warriors have attacked Anderson with defensive pressure to prevent him from getting good open looks at the basket. Andre Iguodala and Harrison Barnes have taken turns getting Anderson out of his comfort zone.

“Obviously I think they are doing a good job of trying to take me out,” Anderson said. “They are putting a smaller guy on me and not leaving me, so It creates an opportunity for me to spread the court and create for my teammates. The few shots I do get, I would like to make them and that’s what I’m working on.”

Coach Monty Williams believes the key to getting his sharpshooting big man untracked is to get Anderson out in transition to get him shots and scoring chances before the Warriors have a chance to set up their defense.

“I feel like if we can take advantage of the stops we’re getting and rebound, we can find him in transition,” Williams said.

Brooks Firing Shakes Pelicans’ Williams

NEW ORLEANS — The news of Scott Brooks’ firing in Oklahoma City hit Monty Williams hard and maybe with very good reason.

The Pelicans coach had to at least wonder that if things turned out differently on the final night of the regular season, it might have been him getting shown the door.

Williams’ team beat the defending champion Spurs in Game 82 to clinch the final spot in the Western Conference playoffs by virtue of a tie-breaker over Brooks’ Thunder.

So when word came down Wednesday that Brooks had been let go by OKC, Williams was visibly shaken, according to John Reid of the New Orleans Times-Picayune:

“I just heard, it’s really tough,” Williams said. “Scott is a really good coach. Anytime one of your colleagues goes down like that, you feel bad for he and his family. Just a tough situation, that’s all I want to say right now.”

The Pelicans and Thunder finished the season with matching records of 45-37, but New Orleans earned the playoff berth by virtue of a 3-1 win in the head-to-head season series that included a February road win at OKC in February when Anthony Davis hit a buzzer-beating 3-pointer.

There rumors circulating throughout the final days of the season that Williams was under make-or-break pressure from team management to reach the playoffs in order to keep his job.

In five seasons coach the Pelicans, Williams is 173-221 (.439). He has one more season remaining on his current contract.

There is still no definitive word on the playing status of Pelicans guards Jrue Holiday for Game 3 against the Warriors on Thursday night. Holiday, who is coming back from a stress fracture in his lower right leg suffered in January, did not play in Game 2 at Oakland, but got in extra work following the team practice on Wednesday.

Guard Tyreke Evans, who suffered a bone bruise in his left knee in Game 1 of the series, gutted out a 16-points, 10-rebound, seven-assist effort in the Game 2 loss, has said he’ll continue playing through the pain.

Mavs’ Parsons, Harris Out For Game 2

HOUSTON — Starting small forward Chandler Parsons and backup point guard Devin Harris will both sit out Game 2 tonight as the Mavs try to even their first round playoff series with the Rockets.

Parsons, who missed the final six games of the regular season with a right knee injury, played nearly 37 minutes in the opening game of the series on Saturday night, but had to limp off the court and go to the locker room at one point during the second quarter.

“This is a young man who is very important to our team now and in the future,” said Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle. “We’re very concerned. He will be re-evaluated (Wednesday) by Dr.(T.O.) Souryal and we’ll have more information for you following that evaluation.”

Asked if he was concerned that Parsons might be lost for the series, Carlisle said: “I’m concerned, period. That does loom as a possibility, but we’ll know more (Wednesday). I will say this: it’s become clear to those of us close to the team and him that he’s been in more pain than he’s let on. The fact the knee has not responded and the swelling has not dissipated the way we hoped means we have to pull the plug on tonight and he’s got to see doc tomorrow and see what’s what.”

Carlisle said that right now Harris is just sidelined for Game 2. He aggravated the big toe injury on his left foot in the opener and played just 10 minutes.”

“His toe is getting a little bit better, but he’s not ready to play,” Carlisle said. “We’ll update his status tomorrow. The hope is that he can do well enough where he can play, but he’s got a situation that’s sensitive because it involves the foot that had a very unique surgery and we got to be careful with it.”

Missing two key members of the lineup will test the Mavs depth and move Richard Jefferson and Al-Farouq Aminu up in the rotation.

“It’s the next man up in this kind of situation,” Carlisle said. “We’ve got a deep team. We’ve had guys step up all year.

“Obviously, R.J. and Aminu become more important guys at the small forward position. (Charlie) Villanueva becomes a more important guy because you’re down manpower at the position that goes from 3 to 4. And (Raymond) Felton now is in the mix. We’ll go with the guys that we have available and we’ll come out with guns blazing.”

Part-time Howard is full-time committed


VIDEO: Dwight Howard is geared up for Game 2 of the series

HOUSTON — The Dallas Mavericks won’t mind at all if Dwight Howard continues to be a part-time player in Game 2 on Tuesday night. Playing just 17 minutes due to foul trouble in the opener, Howard finished with less than eye-popping numbers: 11 points and five rebounds.

But in the short time he was on the court, Howard still did cast a long shadow, slamming home a couple of early dunks and getting a hand on seemingly every shot that Dallas put up at the basket as the Rockets opened an early double-digit lead. The eight-time All-Star center had five blocks in his short stint.

“I think a couple years ago, maybe even last year, I would have allowed a couple fouls get to my head and I wouldn’t be able to be as effective on the defensive end,” Howard said. “I just kept telling myself, ‘If I foul out, I foul out going hard, trying to block everything and being aggressive.’ ”

In 67 previous playoff games, his averages were 20.3 points and 14.1 rebounds. In the Rockets’ six-game, first-round loss to the Trail Blazers in 2014, Howard averaged 26 points, 13.7 rebounds and 2.8 blocks.

This season he played just 41 games, missing virtually all of February and March while being treated for pain and swelling in his right knee.

“He’s always risen up and played very well at this time of year,” Rockets coach Kevin McHale said. “I thought he played with a lot of energy (in Game 1). Foul trouble kind of kept him on the bench longer than we wanted, but I thought he had great energy and I thought he was really focused in.”

Howard says he has tried to turn the negative of missing games into a positive by watching his teammates closely and getting a better understanding of how he must carry himself.

“Just sitting out a lot of games and just watching and analyzing what I need to do for this team and where I need to be mentally for this team to win,” he said.

“When I’m on the floor, I don’t allow whatever is happening around me to affect me as a player. Our team tends to follow that lead. When I’m frustrated, I can’t point the finger at everybody else doing the same thing. I have to make sure I keep a level head and not allow the fouls or whatever it is on the floor that happens that is negative to affect me.

“Just being on the floor, I appreciate these moments that I have. I don’t want to take anything for granted. Anything can happen in a split second. When we’re out there playing, when I’m trying to do whatever I can to help this team, I just want to do it to 100 percent.”

Olajuwon gives Capela high marks


VIDEO: Clint Capela grabs the alley-oop for the dunk

HOUSTON — When the structured part of the Rockets practice is over, Hakeem Olajuwon and Dwight Howard drift naturally toward one another.

If Olajuwon isn’t dipping his shoulder, spinning on one foot and giving Howard a few pointers on technique in the low post, then the pair are just huddled, chatting, nodding heads and trading tales and secrets of the paint.

But while the Hall of Famer gets most of his attention these days for working with the eight-time All-Star, Prof. Olajuwon did take notice of the fresh-faced member of his big man class. With Howard in foul trouble early, 20-year-old Clint Capela was first off the bench in Game 1 and opened a few eyes with his eight points, six rebounds and two blocked shots in 16 minutes.

“He has tremendous potential,” Olajuwon said. “I’m just trying to encourage him to play to his strengths because he does so many things so well. To work with a guy like that is wonderful because his potential is great. His first experience in the playoffs, he played confident and played his game.”

The pregame advice from the legendary Rockets center to the newbie?

“Just to be himself and be comfortable,” said Olajuwon.  “He’s playing with a lot of veterans out there. Just play his game.”

 

Rockets ready for Mavericks’ zone

HOUSTON — Even though zone defenses are still more the exception than the norm in the NBA, don’t expect the Rockets to panic if, as expected, the Mavericks play a lot more of it in Game 2 of their first-round playoff series Tuesday night.

“We’ve seen it off and on throughout the year,” said Rockets coach Kevin McHale. “Usually we’ve been able to handle it pretty well. The key is to just get the ball in certain spots. We have a couple key spots we try to get the ball into. That guy’s just got to be a decision maker.

“I thought in the first game we tried making home run plays from there. Sometimes you just got to lay down a bunch of singles. Just move it on to the weak side, move it on to the open man. It may not be the perfect pass, but it’s the next pass and then the pass after that or the pass after that will be the scoring pass. We just gotta get it moving.”

‘Jet’ Terry Not Yet Ready For A Landing


VIDEO: Rockets on Game 1 victory

HOUSTON — Watch him jump into the passing lanes to make another steal and start a fast break going in the other direction. See him bury another back-breaking 3-pointer and then do the familiar airplane imitation — arms out at his sides — as he runs back down the court.

Jason Terry is 37 years old going on 17, by the looks of things after 16 NBA regular seasons, and the irrepressible point guard is not even glimpsing at the finish line.

He was a wily old veteran when he came off the bench for the Mavericks when they won the championship in 2011 and here he is playing the same role this season with the Rockets against his old team. Except that starter Pat Beverley has been scratched after wrist surgery and Terry is now in the starting lineup. In Game 1 Saturday night, he played just under 22 minutes, hit a trio of 3-pointers to go with two assists and two steals and looked about as excitable and energized as a teenager.

“I definitely feel young,” Terry said. “[Mavericks] coach [Rick] Carlisle used to tell me all the time: ‘You’re a young 30’ or whatever my age was at the time. I’ve always played like that. When I lose that part of my game, then it will time for me to put on my suit and coat. But until that day comes, you’re gonna see me out there flying around, trying to impact the game in different ways and that’s my strong suit.”

When he was informed that his old Dallas buddy Dirk Nowitzki said the Mavs were content with their plan to limit the Rockets big guns James Harden and Dwight Howard and take their chances that guys like him won’t make the difference in a seven-game series, Terry grinned.

“Obviously it’s a good strategy,” he said. “Good luck with that.”

Knee, Shooting Touch Both Pain Parsons

VIDEO: Mavs’ forward Chandler Parsons slams one home.

HOUSTON — Chandler Parsons finally got a chance to do what he wanted to do in front of the old home crowd. He got out in front on the transition game, rose up and hammered home a dunk right into the teeth of the jeering that was coming from the Toyota Center stands.

Trouble was, it came after Parsons had already missed three shots and his Mavericks fell quickly behind by double-digits in the first five minutes of a 118-108 loss to the Rockets Saturday night.

Parsons had missed the last six games of the regular season due to pain in his right knee and looked like someone who couldn’t find a rhythm. He shot 5-for-15 from the field, missed all four of his attempts from behind the 3-point line and finished with 10 points in an ineffective 37 minutes.

“We can’t do that, especially in the the playoffs,” he said. “We have to find a way to be consistent and play the same way for 48 minutes. We can’t give-up those leads and have these teams go on runs. Houston is a team of runs and they have guys that can make plays. We have to try to eliminate those.”

Parsons, who became the object of derision in Houston after signing a free agent contract with the Mavericks for $46 million over three years last summer, had to leave the game and go to the locker midway through the second quarter.

“I just landed and I felt some pain,” he said. “My leg just kind of gave out on me. I couldn’t really shake it. It didn’t feel great. I felt fine the first six to eight minutes and I think that was partly due to adrenaline.

“Something happened when I landed and it was real painful. We have a lot of work to do here and I hope it doesn’t swell up overnight. I’ll visit the doctors and the trainers (Sunday) and hope for the best.

“I want to play more. You have to be smart and I have to have a good judgment with my body. I was definitely a little rusty today and I missed a couple of chippies and some open shots. I didn’t have my usual lift and I was definitely feeling some pain and discomfort in the right knee.”

The pain only made the entire experience worse.

“This definitely isn’t the way you want to play or feel in the playoffs,” he said.