Posts Tagged ‘Fran Blinebury’

Pacers sign Glenn Robinson III to three-year deal

Glenn Robinson III has signed a three-year contract with the Pacers, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

The 40th pick in the 2014 draft by the Timberwolves, he was waived in March and picked up by Philadelphia, where he finished the season. Robinson became a free agent when the 76ers declined to pick up their option.

The 6-foot-7 swingman played in 35 games, averaging 7.5 minutes, 2.1 points and 1.1 rebounds per game as a rookie. He is the son of Glenn Robinson, the No. 1 overall pick in the 1994 NBA Draft by Milwaukee.

Report: Divac offers Peja job with Kings

Those were the best of times in Sacramento, when Vlade Divac was making passes out of the post to Peja Stojakovic to bury another 3-pointer and the cowbells were clanging and Arco Arena was rocking.

The Kings never quite got over the top or past the Lakers for Western Conference supremacy, but it was definitely fun to watch them play and to soak in the atmosphere.

Now it seems Divac wants to recapture some of the old spark and magic. According to Marc Stein of ESPN.com, Divac has asked his Serbian countryman and ex-Kings teammate to help him turn around their old NBA team by offering him a player personnel job with the franchise:

Sources said new Kings vice president of basketball operations Vlade Divac has asked his former NBA and international teammate Stojakovic to leave Europe and move back to the United States to assist him in a player personnel role.

Stojakovic’s No. 16 jersey was retired by the Kings in December. He attended Summer League in Las Vegas with the Kings in a consulting role to Divac earlier this month, but sources say a firm decision on whether the 38-year-old joins them on a permanent basis might not come before September.

Stojakovic, 38, was drafted by the Kings in 1996 and joined them as a player before the lockout-shortened 1999 season, which was also Divac’s first as a King. Together with Chris Webber and Jason Williams, Sacramento’s Serbian duo helped transform the franchise’s fortunes and made them one of the West’s strongest teams for a half-decade.

Report: Mavericks sign Dalembert

The Mavericks are still trying to fill in the big hole in the middle of their lineup caused by DeAndre Jordan’s reneging on a verbal free agent deal.

Dallas previously added 31-year-old center Zaza Pachulia in a trade with Milwaukee. Now the Mavs have signed Samuel Dalembert to a one-year contract for the veteran’s minimum, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Dalembert played for coach Rick Carlisle two years ago in Dallas, and will get an opportunity to play a significant role at center for the Mavericks.

Dalembert will join Zaza Pachulia, acquired in a deal with Milwaukee, as part of the Mavericks’ center rotation.

Dallas lost Tyson Chandler to Phoenix in free agency and was unable to persuade the Los Angeles Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan to honor his verbal commitment in free agency and sign with the Mavericks.

Dalembert, 34, is fighting to reclaim his professional standing in the NBA and a return to the Mavericks could have a strong mutual benefit if he takes advantage of the opportunity.

Dalembert returns to the Mavericks, where he played 80 games in the 2013-14 season before Dallas sent him to New York as part of the Tyson Chandler trade. He averaged 6.6 points and 6.8 rebounds for the Mavericks.

Meanwhile ESPN.com’s Marc Stein is reporting the Mavericks are still not done adding big bodies. He says they still have interest in free agent center JaVale McGee and are closing in on a three-year contract with Salah Mejri of Tunisia, who has played for Real Madrid in Spain.

Jimmer Fredette signs with Spurs

The Spurs have never met a shooter they didn’t like. Jimmer Fredette still carries the cachet of a big-time shooter. So the former BYU legend may be getting his last and best chance to prove that he can be a real NBA contributor with announcement that he’ll go to training camp in San Antonio.

With Marco Belinelli having gone to Sacramento in free agency, the Spurs are in need of a shooter and there is really no better system for anybody who can spot up and make than in Gregg Popovich’s offense.

Fredette spent last season with the Pelicans, appearing in 50 games, averaging 3.6 points and 1.4 assists in 10.2 minutes.

The four-year NBA veteran was originally drafted by the Bucks with the 10th overall pick in the first round of the 2011 NBA Draft.  He was dealt to the Kings in a draft night trade where he spent two-plus seasons.  He also played for the Bulls before moving to New Orleans last season.

In 229 NBA career games, Fredette has averaged 6.1 points, 1.4 assists and 1.0 rebounds in 13.7 minutes while shooting .412 (514-1,248) from the field, .381 (192-504) from beyond the arc and .878 (187-213) from the foul line.

Could LeBron production deal with Warner Bros. lead to Space Jam II?

Call Bugs, Daffy, Tweety, Sylvester and Marvin the Martian and tell them to clear possible space on their cartoon calendars.

Coming on the heels of his successful movie debut in Amy Schumer’s Trainwreck, 30-year-old LeBron James could be laying down the tracks for a future as a leading man on the big screen and a new version of a fan favorite.

Warner Bros. Entertainment said Wednesday that it’s reached a deal with SpringHill Entertainment — the production company co-founded by the Cavaliers star and his longtime business partner, Maverick Carter — “spanning all areas of content creation” and that “will see James’ creative footprint touch all areas of” Warner Bros.’ endeavors, including television, film and digital content.

“LeBron James has one of the most powerful, well-known brands in the world and we are excited to be in business with him and his partner, Maverick Carter, and SpringHill Entertainment,” said [Warner Bros. Chairman and CEO Kevin] Tsujihara. “The combination of LeBron’s global media presence and Warner Bros.’ unmatched production and distribution expertise is a big win for fans everywhere. We’re excited to welcome LeBron and Maverick to the Warner Bros. family and look forward to partnering on incredible projects that will connect with consumers across a variety of platforms.”

“Connecting with my fans and telling meaningful stories have always been my passion. In everything I’ve done, from Nike commercials to Uninterrupted and Survivor’s Remorse, it’s always about connecting with people of all ages and providing unique content they can all enjoy,” said LeBron James. “And I’ve always loved movies, which makes Warner Bros. the ultimate partner to help us continue to push the envelope. I can’t wait to see what we come up with.” […]

Having already conquered most of the terrestrial basketball world, the big question out there is whether this arrangement with Warner Bros. could lead to James starring in a 21st century reboot of “Space Jam?” LeBron has previously said he would be interested.

Here was one possible hint of a hookup with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Marvin the Martian and the rest of the gang:

Cuban and Ballmer ‘clear the air’

Mark Cuban and Steve Ballmer have apparently buried the hatchet.

And no, not in each other’s back.

According to a message Cuban released on his Cyberdust account Wednesday, the pair of NBA owners straightened things out after last week’s public squabble involving free agent center DeAndre Jordan, when the Mavericks thought they had signed him away from the Clippers.

Cuban said the two team owners met during the league meetings in Las Vegas on Tuesday at the league meetings and “cleared the air.”

Cuban said he is not unhappy with the moratorium period for free agents. The league allows teams to negotiate with free agents starting July 1, but players can’t officially be signed to a contract until over a week later. After DeAndre Jordan told the the Mavericks he would join them, the Clippers were able to put on a late full-court press and change his mind the day before signing day. But not before the whole affair played out like a live soap opera on Twitter, complete with competing emojis.

Cuban’s statement in its entirety:

Hey mavs fans. So I had a nice conversation with Steve Ballmer, owner of the Clippers yesterday during our NBA meetings.

It started off more than a little frigid, but we both cleared the air on a few things.

I told him exactly what I told other owners, I didn’t have a problem with his hail Mary approach to keeping a player. I understood why they did it. And even how they did it. They got their player back. End of story.

There are still a few unresolved issues that the NBA will have to work through but one I don’t feel is an issue is the moratorium.
Nothing that happened with this deal was the result of the moratorium

The thing about the NBA is that you don’t know which deals are the good deals and which arrows you avoided till you start playing the games

My guess is that we open the season against the Clippers. That’s when the real fun will begin.

+letsgomavs

Rehabbing Paul George looks to Rio


VIDEO: Pacers coach Frank Vogel talks on Paul George’s injury, team’s future

Nobody knows better the extra hours of work and dedication that go into pursuing the Olympic goal. Nobody understands more than Paul George the risk that goes into such a decision.

But nearly a year after gruesomely snapping his right leg during a warmup game in Las Vegas and missing almost all of the 2014-15 season, the Pacers star says he wants to be back with Team USA for the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

George also says he has the full support of original Dream Team member Larry Bird, Pacers president of basketball operations, and the entire franchise, according to ESPN.com.

“Larry, of all people, knows how important it is to play and represent your country. So he’s got my back on that one, and it’s a personal goal,” George said. “Coach (Mike) Krzyzewski knows I’m on board.”

George, however, said he won’t be in attendance at Team USA’s minicamp next month in Las Vegas, according to the Indianapolis Star.
He was speaking from the Kroger Unplug and Play Paul George Basketball ProCamp at Avon High School on Indianapolis’ west side, where he was helping to teach 250 youngsters the finer points of the game.

He said he can’t wait to put the injury behind him.

“I feel great,” George said. “I still notice some things that are not Paul George characteristic yet, but I feel good and the good thing is we’re still in mid-summer. By training camp, I’ll be ready to go.”

Ten players who made impression at Orlando Summer League


VIDEO: Stanley Johnson discusses his Summer League play

ORLANDO — Seven days, 25 games and so many different stories at the Orlando Pro Summer League. Here are 10 players that made an impression:

Aaron Gordon, F, Magic — The No. 4 overall pick in the 2014 Draft brought a reputation as an athletic, high-energy player into his rookie season in Orlando, but one who struggled with his shot and that was born out. But Gordon has spent time working with Magic shooting coach Dave Love to change the mechanics of his shot and it seems to have paid off. He looked comfortable in the three games he played, leading the league in scoring at 21.7 points per game and even hit 50 percent (6-for-12) on 3s.

Stanley Johnson, F, Pistons — From the enthusiasm that he brought to the court every day, you might have thought Johnson was on a trip to Disney World. It’s not cocky when you can do it and the Pistons’ No. 8 draft pick has all the skills and talent in his bag of tricks to excel in the NBA as soon as coach Stan Van Gundy turns him loose in the rotation. Johnson says he’s not trying to prove anything to the folks who thought the Pistons made a mistake by not taking Justise Winslow. But it sure looks that way and that’s good for Detroit.

Myles Turner, C, Pacers — The knock on the tall, skinny kid out of the University of Texas is just that. He’s skinny. But that didn’t stop him from taking advantage of his size to block more than four shots a game and protect the rim. It’s a new day and a new style in Indy with the plodding Roy Hibbert gone to the Lakers and veteran David West to the Spurs. The No. 11 pick in the draft will be thrown right into the lineup and could get a chance to shine immediately. He shot 60.5 percent from the field and the big guy can knock down the jumper.

Mario Hezonja, G-F, Magic — After completing a full European season in Barcelona, the No. 5 pick in the draft jetted to the U.S. and played in just two games at the summer league. He struggled with his shot, through he did knock down a game-winning 3-pointer at the buzzer in his debut. He’s also got off-the-charts athleticism, which he showed off with a ferocious one-handed drive and dunk. Though he’s only 20, Hezonja has been a professional for years and will force his way onto the floor for the Magic soon.

Willie Reed, F-C, Nets — Undrafted out of Saint Louis in 2001, he’s spent four seasons trying to prove himself with four different D-League teams before spending last season playing in the Dominican Republic. He came to Orlando with the Heat and immediately drew comparisons to Hassan Whiteside for his ability to play defense and gather rebounds. Reed impressed enough at the summer league for Brooklyn to sign him to a contract.

Frank Kaminsky, F-C, Hornets — The college basketball player of the year had trouble finding a rhythm on his shot in the early games, but the Hornets know that’s an area they don’t have to be concerned about it. He showed an ability to put the ball on the floor and get to the basket and did a solid job rebounding. He needs work at the defensive end, but appeared comfortable and confident enough moving ahead toward training camp.

Troy Daniels, G, Hornets — What’s the old saying? You can never have enough shooting. Daniels keeps trying to prove that to different teams as he moves about the league trying to find a permanent home. He lit up from the outside this week, hitting at a 55 percent clip from behind the 3-point line and a team like Charlotte that needs shooters could finally be the place where he sticks.

Joe Young, G, Pacers — The second-round draft pick of the Pacers was recovering from a stomach illness all week and still managed to stand out as one of the top rookies. The 2015 Pac-12 Player of the Year can fill up the basket has the kind of demeanor you want in a point guard — authoritative and vocal. He’s arriving in Indy at the perfect time as the Pacers will look to play an up-tempo game and he has a nose for pushing the ball up court. He’s a keeper.

Justise Winslow, F, Heat — Getting the ball to go into the basket was a problem for Winslow right from the start, but it didn’t keep him from attacking every game with confidence and doing enough other things to help his team. He knows that he belongs at the NBA level and goes at the basket relentlessly, drawing fouls and getting more free throws than anybody else in the league. Given the Heat no reason to think they didn’t get very lucky having him fall into their laps at the No. 10 spot.

Branden Dawson, F, Clippers — For all the back-patting for getting DeAndre Jordan to change his mind, the Clippers still have a serious lack of depth. The 6-foot-6 forward showed a nose for rebounding and putting the ball in the bucket all week and has just the right kind of overachiever attitude that comes from being picked No. 56 in the draft and could eventually find its way onto the NBA roster. He put up three double-doubles four games played. One drawback is he could make Jordan look good at the line, making just 3-for-9 on free throws.

Pacers’ Young is hungry at the point


VIDEO: Joe Young breaks down his Thursday performance

ORLANDO — Just say Joe Young showed up hungry for the start of Summer League. He’ll pretty much leave that way, too.

But in between, the 6-foot-2 point guard has given the Pacers a steady diet of the things they want him to do. Speed, smarts and a desire to learn.

A stomach ailment prevented Young from working out with his teammates back in Indianapolis last week, but he hit the ground running and hasn’t missed a game at the Orlando Pro Summer League.

With their big man Myles Turner getting a rest on Thursday, it was Young who led the Pacers to their first win by putting up 28 points, shooting 5-for-9 on 3-pointers, and adding three assists and three rebounds.

“To watch him go from that first game where I thought he was still sick and just too frantic and a little too wild, which is natural, to playing a game like this, was very satisfying to see,” said Pacers summer league coach Dan Burke.

“In that first game you could tell the adrenaline was running and he was so stoked. Today’s game I thought he looked more controlled. His eyes were up. He was seeing shooters in pick-and-roll. He was seeing the roll man. I thought that was a quick progression. So I was excited. It’s the kind of play we expected when we drafted him.”

Young was a second-round draft pick, 43rd overall, after playing four years of college ball, two at Houston before transferring to Oregon. He was the Pac-12 Player of the Year in 2015 and comes with the basketball DNA of his father, Michael Young, who was a member of the famous Phi Slama Jama teams at Houston.

What also lit up Burke’s face was the commitment that Young showed when he was ill and couldn’t be on the practice floor with his teammates.

“He’s a sponge. He’s an eager learner,” Burke said. “And he took it upon himself to catch up as quick as he could. He was in there drawing up the plays that we wanted him to learn for himself. He was studying constantly. Then when we got down here to Florida, he met with (fellow rookie) Myles Turner in the lobby of the hotel and was going over plays. That’s the kind of kid you love to have on your team.”

Young’s week was an uphill climb as he took the floor for the first game on Sunday barely able to keep any food in his stomach.

“I’m still not necessarily 100 percent, but I’m tough,” Young said. “I don’t want no red flags saying, ‘Oh, he gets sick and can’t play.’ I’m just trying to be a warrior. I thought each game I got better and the team took a step. It wasn’t me by myself. I couldn’t have done stuff I did without my team.”

Everybody is a virtual stranger in summer league, which is what makes play often ragged and doesn’t lend itself to teamwork. It’s trickier even for a point guard to be making something out of the chaos.

“But that’s part of a being a point guard,” Young said. “You take control. You’ve got to be vocal. You’ve got to put the teammates where they’re supposed to go.”

Young showed that he could feed the 6-foot-11 Turner in the post when they played together, get the ball to his shooters and also create his own shot.

“For one, he’s a smart guy and that helps,” Burke said. “He’s also vocal and we haven’t had too many vocal point guards the last couple of years. He’s not afraid to take charge and once he gets comfortable with our system and around our guys, where he knows exactly where he’s telling a guy to go, he’ll probably even be more vocal.”

Young also looks like a good fit for the more up-tempo style that team president Larry Bird and head coach Frank Vogel want the Pacers to play next season.


VIDEO: Larry Bird on what he sees for Pacers in 2015-16

“We don’t want to go helter-skelter,” Burke said. “But get it up quick and get into our stuff quick. Look to score in the first eight seconds. If you don’t, then you’ve got to score in the last eight seconds and execute. Joe’s that kind of guy.

“I think we’ve had good defensive teams. So we need more stops and continue to get those stops and shots and runs. Joe’s about the best I’ve seen that we’ve had in the last couple of years in getting it up the court. C.J. Watson wasn’t really a push guy like that. Donald Sloan wasn’t that fast. And George Hill can be fast, but he’s more comfortable just getting up at a decent tempo. He’s going to be an interesting player to watch. Joe’s fast, aggressive, confident.”

And still hungry.

Johnson keeps firing on all Pistons


VIDEO: Stanley Johnson turns in solid double-double

ORLANDO — Before Stanley Johnson even took his very first sip of NBA competition, he declared that he wasn’t “going to let anybody punk me” on the court.

So when his most recent game at the Orlando Pro Summer League tipped off and the Pacers chose to run a post-up play for the man he was guarding, Solomon Hill, Johnson reacted as if someone had touched him with a cattle prod.

“For some guy to attack me the first play of the game, I think that says volumes about what the coach thinks about me and therefore I take it disrespectfully,” Johnson said. “From that point on, if he scores the basket, doesn’t score the basket, that’s just like a another chip on my shoulder already to start the game.”

Through four games in the practice gym at the Amway Center, Johnson has been constantly hustling, always forceful and giving Detroit fans a reason to look forward to his rookie year against the big boys. Though Pistons head coach and team president Stan Van Gundy says just because he was the No. 8 pick in the NBA Draft and has shown the joys of summer, it doesn’t mean Johnson will be handed a spot in the starting lineup or even the rotation.

“I think it’s important that (rookies) play when they deserve to play,” said Van Gundy. “And not just, ‘We’re going to play our guy.’ I know some people believe in that. I don’t.

“I think it inhibits a guy’s development when he’s simply handed minutes and doesn’t have to do anything to earn them and thus there is no reason to work hard or change the way you play.

“You always like to see him play against good players, but I’ve been at this long enough that I don’t get real pumped up if a guy plays well in summer league, and I don’t get too depressed if he doesn’t. There is just not a lot of carryover.”

Nevertheless, Johnson has been confident, effective and consistent, averaging 17.8 points, 7.5 rebounds and 2.3 steals.

As a defender, Johnson has shown an ability to blow up the pick-and-roll. He’s repeatedly gone to the floor chasing down loose balls and can make the show-stopping play. Just when Indy’s Romero Osby thought he had a breakaway dunk, there was Johnson swooping in from behind at the last second with for a resounding rejection that showed he doesn’t simply write off a possession.

“Those are effort plays. Those are winning plays,” said Pistons summer league coach Bob Beyer. “When he blocked that shot at the rim he never gave up on the play. He just kept coming and again I think that says a lot about him as a competitor.”

There were questions about Johnson’s shooting ability coming out of Arizona, where he hit just 44.6 percent of his attempts in his only college season. But he’s making at a 64.3 percent clip here and is 4-for-9 on 3-pointers.

Most important, Johnson has shown an ability to play an overall game and to have the kind of personality that commands attention. He keeps telling everyone who’ll listen that he isn’t into comparisons with his good friend Justise Winslow, whom the Pistons passed over to take Johnson with the eighth pick and just wants to prove that he’s as good or better than anybody in his draft class. For now. He’s got the rest of the league in his long-range sights. He’s skilled, competitive and thoroughly engaging.

Somebody asked Johnson if it was accurate to just check off every box of all-around skills when it came to describing his game.

“I would say so,” Johnson said. “I have a lot of learning to do in making those checks darker, bolder and getting better at a lot of different things, but I can be very versatile on the court. Like I was preaching before the draft started, I can go one through four positions. I can do a lot of the things on the court.”

Then tell you about them.