Posts Tagged ‘DeAndre Jordan’

Morning shootaround — Feb. 12


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played Feb. 11

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Karl agrees to 4-year deal with Kings | Report: Stoudemire, Knicks begin buyout talks | Report: Kanter wants Jazz to trade him | Rivers miffed over Jordan’s All-Star snub

No. 1: Report: Karl agrees to 4-year deal with Kings The Sacramento Bee first broke the news yesterday afternoon that the Sacramento Kings will hire George Karl as their new coach after the All-Star Game break. More details have emerged on the Karl-Kings union, courtesy of Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski, on the length of the deal and Karl’s marching orders for the rest of this season:

George Karl has reached agreement on a four-year contract worth nearly $15 million to become coach of the Sacramento Kings, a league source told Yahoo Sports.

Sacramento plans to make a formal announcement soon.

The deal will include a $1.5 million buyout provision on the $5 million owed Karl in the final year of the contract, a source told Yahoo Sports.

Karl will earn $1.25 million for the rest of the 2014-15 season, which will begin with his Kings debut after the All-Star break on Feb. 20 against Golden State. Karl is set to earn $3.25 million in 2015-16 and $5 million per season in the final two years of the deal, a source said.

After owner Vivek Ranadive insisted on the firing of ex-coach Michael Malone, the Kings struggled under interim coach Tyrone Corbin and turned toward Karl in the past week. Corbin plans to leave the organization and will not be a part of Karl’s staff for the rest of the season, a source said.

Karl’s directive will be to reach the immensely talented, but combustible 7-foot center DeMarcus Cousins. Cousins made the Western Conference All-Star reserves, averaging 23.8 points and 12.4 rebounds a game this season.

Kings general manager Pete D’Alessandro informed Corbin on Friday that the organization planned to conduct an immediate search for a new coach.


VIDEO: DeMarcus Cousins talks about his goals for the rest of the season

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Morning shootaround — Feb. 10


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played Feb. 9

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Popovich gets win No. 1,000 | Anthony aggravates knee injury | Jordan making noise for Clippers

No. 1: Popovich rolls into the NBA history books — If you missed it last night (or this morning), the San Antonio Spurs topped the Indiana Pacers. That, in and of itself, isn’t much news. But that win gave Spurs coach Gregg Popovich his 1,000th as San Antonio’s coach and made him just the ninth coach in NBA history to reach that many career victories. Our Fran Blinebury chronicles how Popovich’s way has morphed into the “Spurs Way”, which has made San Antonio a model NBA franchise:

We all know what it’s about,” he told reporters last week, “and when it happens I’ll say something about it. Obviously, you have to be around a while to do that. It’s not going to happen if you’re not in that situation. You’ve got to have an organization that’s allowed you to be there a long time and shown a lot of patience in letting you grow, that kind of thing. Obviously you have to have players that go and win games, because I haven’t scored many points or gotten many rebounds that I remember because I wasn’t in the league.

“It’s a combination of all those things to get any kind of a goal like that realized. So it will give me some pause and make me think about it. Like, ‘What the hell am I still doing this for?’ probably.”

Perhaps because, in the process, he’s become a world-wide seeker of talent, full-on proponent of breaking down international barriers, gospel-spreader of the global game, larger-than-life character for the gruff demeanor and, oh by the way, a five-time NBA champion.

After the Spurs took apart the star-fueled Heat to win the 2014 NBA title with a combination of ball movement, shooting and voracious defense that was part clinic and part work of art, the funnel cloud of activity that is Manu Ginobili said, “We play this way because it is how Pop wants us to play.”

It is the how that has been most impressive since he took over as coach in December 1996 and steadily turned one of the league’s smallest markets into what is generally regarded as the model franchise.

It is often noted that Popovich’s historic stack of wins would not be quite so tall without Duncan providing the stoic, resolute backbone for the Spurs since 1997, most often by Popovich himself.

There was, of course, that first decade of Duncan’s career when he was able to overpower and overwhelm opponents with his package of fundamentally sound skills.

But would Duncan be making preparing for his 15th NBA All-Star Game appearance and gearing up as the cornerstone of another playoff contending team as his 39th birthday nears if Popovich hadn’t so carefully managed and rationed his minutes?

From the time the Spurs won their fourth championship in 2007 until No. 5 swept in last season, Duncan, Ginobili and Parker all were showing the effects of time. Yet Popovich milked the most from their abilities by sticking to his philosophical guns, even if it meant fines from the commissioner’s office or disdain from TV executives when he sat out his stars. He set an NBA record by not having a single player average 30 minutes per game last season, in the process developing a deep, productive bench and then turned them all loose, along with the young tsunami that is Kawhi Leonard to swamp Miami’s Big Three. His way has now become a league standard.


VIDEO: Brent Barry reflects on how Gregg Popovich affected his career and life

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One Stat, One Play: No D, No Run, No Dunk


VIDEO: One Stat, One Play: The Clippers’ up-close problems

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Los Angeles Clippers are generally considered to be a title contender.

They were one of four teams to rank in the top 10 in both offensive and defensive efficiency last season. They were a possession away from taking a 3-2 lead in the conference semifinals. And they’re in their second season under Doc Rivers.

But the Clippers are off to a disappointing start, holding a 6-4 record after Wednesday’s win in Orlando. Their four losses are all to teams with winning records, but haven’t looked sharp on either end of the floor, have home losses to the Kings and Bulls, and are one of four teams that has regressed by at least two points per 100 possessions on both ends of the floor.

One disturbing stat is that the Clippers rank last in shots in the restricted area. They’re the only team getting fewer than 20 attempts per game from the most efficient spot on the floor.

20141120_per-game

That’s a problem when you have two of the league’s best finishers. Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan were two of five players who shot better than 70 percent in the restricted area on at least 300 attempts last season.

20141120_70_300

Griffin’s attempts in the restricted area are down from 8.1 per game last season (48 percent of his total shots) to 6.2 this year (34 percent).

Griffin has worked a ton on his jumper and his mid-range field goal percentage has improved from 35 percent in 2012-13 to 37 percent last season to 39 percent this year. And part of his reduced attempts at the rim is a desire to show off his improvement from the outside.

“When you’ve deposited a lot of money,” Griffin said early this season about the work he’s put in on his jumper, “you feel good about writing checks.”

But another part of it is that Griffin isn’t getting out in transition as much as he has in the past. According to SportVU, just nine percent (15/166) of Griffin’s shots of come in the first six seconds of the shot clock, down from 18 percent last season.

That takes us to the Clippers’ defense, which ranks 22nd through Wednesday, allowing 104.3 points per 100 possessions, 2.2 more than they did last season. And fewer stops leads to fewer opportunities to run.

The video above is our fourth installment “One Stat, One Play,” a look at how the Clippers have been scrambling defensively after sending their big man away from the basket to aggressively defend pick-and-rolls. Does that scheme need to change or do the Clips just need to buckle down and execute it better?

They visit the Miami Heat in the first game of TNT’s double-header (8 p.m. ET) on Thursday.

A dozen stories to open training camps

Little has changed with the ageless Spurs since the confetti rained down on the champs, but much is now different with the rest of the NBA. So as the first handful of training camps open this week, here are a dozen storylines that will require immediate attention:

LeBron rocks, Cleveland rolls

LeBron James, 2007 (Gregory Shamus/Getty)

(Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty)

Is it really as simple as putting the giant sign of LeBron James back up in downtown Cleveland and turning the clock back to the days of the Cavs as contenders for them to win it all? With Kyrie Irving‘s continued growth, his performance at the FIBA World Cup fresh in our minds, with the arrival of Kevin Love to be the third leg of the stool, it only seems a matter of time before the Cavs are on the main stage in June. Let’s remember that Irving and Love have never even been to the playoffs, let alone made a deep run. But let’s also remember that this is the Eastern Conference and that means the door is open.

Kobe vs. The World

Let’s face it. Nobody — not LeBron, not Carmelo Anthony, not Kevin Durant, not anybody — will have every step he takes on the court scrutinized and analyzed more than Kobe Bryant as he battles the calendar and what would seem to be common sense as he tries to come back from a torn Achilles tendon and a knee fracture at age 36. He’ll be determined, defiant, maybe even destructive to his own well-being. More than anything, you have to hope he can stay healthy all the way through the long grind of the season, if for no other reason than to see how he drives and browbeats a ragtag collection of post-Pau Gasol era Lakers in a quixotic quest.

Big Man in the Big Easy

They’ve changed owners, changed their team name and solidified the face of the franchise for the first time since New Orleans was last in the playoffs. Now it’s time to see if Anthony Davis can build on his big dog experience with Team USA in the World Cup and put some bite into the Pelicans. Davis averaged 20.8 points, 10 rebounds and made his first All-Star Game appearance last season. But based on the way he played in Spain, that might have only been scratching the surface. There are some ready to jump Davis over reigning MVP Durant as the next “best player in the game.” He’ll get up front support this season from Omer Asik, and if Jrue Holiday, Ryan Anderson and Tyreke Evans can stay healthy, this could be the beginning of a whole new era.

Stuck on the launch pad

Until LeBron went back home to Cleveland, it was hard to top the last two offseason jackpots hit by the Rockets — landing James Harden and Dwight Howard. But that streak hit a wall when the Rockets went all-in to bring Carmelo Anthony or Chris Bosh to Houston. It was a bold and grand gamble that required trading away Omer Asik (to the Pelicans) and Jeremy Lin (to the Lakers) to create salary cap space. It also led to allowing Chandler Parsons to become a free agent and sign with the Dallas Mavericks. Now with neither prize free agent, the Rockets are a team that won 54 games a year ago, lost in the first round of the playoffs and have the depth of a one-night pickup at a singles bar. How much can they get from Terrence Jones, Donatas Motiejunas and Isaiah Canaan? What does Jason Terry have left? How much of the weight can Harden and Howard realistically carry?

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First Team: CP3, Doc make strides in L.A.

In this five-part series, I’ll take a look at the best games from last season’s All-NBA first team. The metric I’ve used to figure out the best games is more art than formula, using “production under pressure” as the heuristic for selection. For example, volume scoring in a close game against a stout team on the road gets more weight than volume scoring against the Bucks at home in a blowout. Big games matter. Big clutch games matter more.

Chris Paul turned in a third straight All-NBA first team bid with the Clippers.

Chris Paul turned in a third straight All-NBA first team bid with the Clippers.

Chris Paul always has the ball on a string. He can dish with either hand, making any bounce pass through tight holes — and lobs to Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan — possible from any angle. His pull-up jumper is lethal, and you have to get a hand up on him when he’s 23 feet out.

On the other side, he hounds. He flops. He annoys. He barks. His hands are active. In Game 4 of the 2014 Western Conference semis, he alternated between guarding Russell Westbrook (First Team-worthy) and Kevin Durant (a fellow First Teamer) as his team completed a rally back from 22.

But then came the yang of the last 49 seconds of Game 5. A turnover, a foul on a four-point play and another turnover from Paul gave the Thunder the game. They would close out the series in Game 6. It was the type of loss that encapsulates Paul: The smart, methodical, ball-on-a-string point guard can be too smart, too methodical and too ball dominant at the worst moments.

He is still a cut above the rest, continuing to redefine the Clippers’ brand to newbies who have no clue about their inept past. At 29, he is an historically great hardwood bandit (2.41 spg ranks fourth all time) and passer (9.91 apg also third all-time). There are deeper playoff successes and a MVP award to be had, but with a capable motivator in coach Doc Rivers in his ear, his point guard supremacy threatens to remain for the foreseeable future.

Here are his top games last season:

October 31, 2013 – Dawn Of A Season-Long Rivalry

The Line: 42 points, 15 assists, 6 steals, 6 turnovers

The Quote:Man, I had six turnovers. That’s ridiculous. That means there was six times I didn’t give us an opportunity to score. I’m big on turnovers. I hate turnovers.” — Paul


VIDEO: Chris Paul carves up the Warriors in a Halloween matchup

Tiny Archibald should have been proud. Two nights after being handled by the Lakers in the season opener, Cliff Paul’s brother dealt out the complete package. He was sinking free-throw line jumpers, baseline turnaround jumpers. He had his way with a pre-Team USA Klay Thompson, including a bullying score on a post-up. He even got in a sneaky dunk in Jermaine O’Neal’s mug.

Then there were those three consecutive alley oops with Blake, as well as the verbal jabs and scowls at the Warriors bench. This was CP3’s point god night, only if god coughed up the pill six times. (more…)

Redick: New dad, a fresh start

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – J.J. Redick is packing up for training camp this week, leaving his summer home in Austin, Texas, for Los Angeles. Only this time there’s a little extra to pack. A lot more.

J.J. Redick (Bart Young/NBAE)

J.J. Redick (Bart Young/NBAE)

Diapers: check.

Wipes: check.

Bottle: check.

Blanket: check.

Stroller: check.

Crib: check.

Stuffed animals: check.

Redick became a dad about a month ago to bouncing baby boy Knox. So now J.J., wife Chelsea and Knox are headed to L.A., where the revitalized Clippers are entering the most anticipated season in franchise history. They have a new, enthusiastic owner, a refreshed team spirit and a growing fan base (maybe bigger outside of L.A. than inside) that includes one brand-spanking newbie.

“I’ve loved being a dad,” Redick told NBA.com during an interview last week. “My wife has been an incredible mom. I didn’t know what to expect or how I would feel, but the second the doctor put Knox in my arms I fell in love.”

As Redick’s family life has taken a turn for the better over the last few years, his professional career has been full of upheaval. He watched the Orlando Magic disintegrate during and after the Dwightmare. Traded at the 2013 deadline, he landed in Milwaukee rather than on a contender. Traded to the Clippers last summer, injuries limited him to 35 games. Then came the Donald Sterling saga during the first round of the playoffs.

Four months since being knocked out of the second round by Oklahoma City, Redick — knock on wood — is feeling great physically, and his teammates will likely quickly realize it’s going to be tough to wipe that smile off his face. He’s looking for a big year for himself and for a franchise desperately seeking to advance to a first-ever Western Conference final.

“We talked about a championship all last season. We came up short,” Redick said. “That will still be our goal this season.”

NBA.com: You’ve been on the front line of two very strange situations: Dwight Howard and Sterling. Let’s start with the latter since it is still so fresh. What do you remember most about the reaction of the team after the tapes went public?

Redick: After we lost Game 4 at Golden State, a few of my teammates were crying in the locker room.  Normally, that sort of thing only happens in the NBA after a season-ending loss, deep in the playoffs. But my teammates were hurt. We were all hurt and pissed off. It didn’t matter what the color of your skin was.

NBA.com: Did you ever believe the team was close to not taking the floor as a form of  protest during the Golden State series?

Redick: I always felt we were going to play. Doc’s [coach Doc Rivers] leadership during the entire situation was outstanding. We followed his lead. He felt we should play. I also was confident that [NBA commissioner] Adam Silver would take the correct course of action before any sort of league-wide protest took place. And Adam did.

NBA.com: How did you guys pull yourselves together to beat the Warriors in the first round? Then the series against Oklahoma City was crazy, could have gone either way. Were you guys mentally gassed by then?

Redick: Game 4 against Golden State was brutal. There was no way we were going to win that game. But we went seven games with Golden State because they were a very good, a tough basketball team, not because of the Sterling fiasco. They also believed they were better than us. That played a huge factor in the difficulty of putting them away. We beat them because we were the better team. In a seven-game series, the best team usually wins. I’ve been in the league eight years and have been on eight playoff teams. Every single series is mentally and emotionally taxing. I don’t believe for a second that the Sterling thing had anything to do with us not beating OKC. [Russell] Westbrook and [Kevin] Durant were phenomenal and each game they won they had one or two other guys step up and play big roles.

NBA.com: Stepping back to Orlando, Howard’s saga must have seemed never-ending. When you look back, what emotion lingers considering how quickly the team went from the Finals in 2009 to rebuilding?

Redick: When I look back at my time in Orlando, my immediate thought is that I’m grateful for all of my experiences there.  I didn’t play at all initially. I worked my way into the rotation by the end of my third year.  I got to start eight playoff games in ’09 on our way to the Finals — including a Game 7 in Boston against the defending champs. By my seventh year I had developed an unreal relationship with the fans and the Central Florida community. I have nothing but love for that place. Maybe the circumstances surrounding Dwight’s departure could have been handled differently by all parties, but Dwight felt like he wanted a bigger stage and a new experience. You can’t fault a guy for that. He felt that was best for him and that’s what he pursued.

NBA.com: Stan Van Gundy obviously got caught up in the Dwightmare and lost his job. Have you stayed in touch with Van Gundy and how do you think he’ll do in Detroit, a franchise desperately needing some direction?

Redick: Stan is my guy. I talk to Stan a few times a month. We chat about everything. He’s a man that I have a great deal of respect and admiration for. I’m excited for him and his staff. He’s too good of a coach and a competitor. Detroit started heading in the right direction the second he signed his contract.

NBA.com: You were in trade rumors for a long time in Orlando and then finally got dealt. But you ended up on the eighth-seeded Bucks and not on a bona fide contender. Was that deflating?

Redick: Again, I felt fortunate to be in one place for almost seven years. I’m not a franchise player by any stretch. For a guy like me to be in one place that long is rare. I wish I could have finished the season in Orlando, but I suppose getting traded was inevitable. I didn’t have any control over the situation. Would I have liked to go to say, the Spurs? Sure. The Magic had other offers but they did what they felt was in their best interest. I would do the same thing if I was a GM. This is a business. No one is out there doing anyone any favors. My only regret is that I didn’t help Milwaukee win more games and get out of the eighth spot to avoid Miami.

NBA.com: Last summer you got traded to a title contender, the Clippers, but a bad wrist injury and then a disc injury to your back limited you to 35 games. How tough was it sitting out on a team with such high hopes, and how healthy were you during the playoffs considering you returned for just five games before the playoffs started?

Redick: Last year was very frustrating given the amount of preparation that I put into every summer and into every season. I stay in shape year round. I do extra during the season. I take care of myself. It was also frustrating to be on a team with so many great players and with so much camaraderie and only be able to play in 35 regular-season games. But again, some things are out of your control. I took a hard fall against Sacramento — my second hard fall in a week’s span — and broke a bone and tore a ligament in my wrist. I also believe that those two hard falls led to my back injury — I fell both times on the same spot in my lower back where my herniated disc occurred.  When I had my back injury — disc herniation at L3 — I attempted to play through the pain for five games at the end of January. The pain wasn’t the issue. My right leg basically stopped working at a level for me to play.

Eventually, the L3 nerve that controls my right quad shut down and stopped functioning properly. I really had no functional capacity in that muscle. It was very scary. I could not do any exercise or movement on my right leg for several weeks. I could walk but that was about it. I had three epidurals in about a three-week time period before and after the All-Star break. I was on a six- to 10-week timeframe to allow the nerve to heal on its own and avoid surgery. About the seven- or eight-week mark the nerve started firing a little bit and I was able to get back out on the court. I didn’t feel like I was 100 percent in the playoffs, but I always tell people that NBA players are 100 percent on media day. After that, there’s too much wear and tear on the body during a season to ever feel “100 percent.” My recovery from my back injury was good enough to play. That’s all that matters.

NBA.com: Since new owner Steve Ballmer gained control of the Clippers, is there a different feeling surrounding the franchise?

Redick: It feels like we can all move forward.

NBA.com: When analyzing the Clippers’ personnel, some suggest the missing ingredient is a sturdy, athletic wing who can score and defend the other team’s best player. What’s your reaction to that?

Redick: First of all, there’s only so many great players at every position. Right now, point guard and power forward are the two deepest positions in the league. Secondly, we have two max players [Chris Paul and Blake Griffin] and another guy making $11 million [DeAndre Jordan]. It’s virtually impossible to build a “dream team” with the current financial system in the NBA. This isn’t a video game or fantasy league. I’m sure every team feels they can get better at certain positions. Having said all that, I feel like we are covered. I love Matt [Barnes]. I love our young wings. We have enough to get it done at that position. We have enough to get to the West finals and beyond.

Griffin King of Stars of NBA.com Top 10


VIDEO: The top five players in the Stars of the NBA.com Top 10 poll

By Beau Estes, for NBA.com

For pure entertainment value during a night working at NBA.com/NBA TV, there is nothing more fun than the Top 10. The videos are a sugar rush of dunks, buzzer-beaters and no look passes that spark a roar of post-midnight debate in our highlight room each night.

Letting the fans in on this discourse was the major motivation behind the first ever “Stars of the NBA.com Top 10.” We wanted to see which players the fans thought consistently created the best highlights. It was just that simple.

So, as we release the top five players on this list, it seems we’ve learned that the fans are seeing things in much the same way our highlight editors do. Not surprisingly, Lob City’s Blake Griffin grabbed the top spot by a close, but relatively safe margin. The battle for second on the list came down to a pair of MVP’s — Kevin Durant and LeBron James and the margin was razor thin. How thin? Voting closed at midnight last night and at 11:57, with scores of votes counted in the last hour, James and Durant were literally tied. One minute later, in a buzzer-beater of sorts, the ballot below was cast that separated the two stars…

@Plox300, a self-described “spectator,” checked into the game and determined the final order at the last second pushing LeBron ahead of KD. So, thanks to the fans for all the votes throughout the process and without further adieu, here are the final results for the top five of the “Stars of the NBA.com Top 10.”

  • 1. Blake Griffin 28%
  • 2. LeBron James 24%
  • 3. Kevin Durant 23%
  • 4. Russell Westbrook 13%
  • 5. Stephen Curry 12%

Earlier this week we released spots 6-10 and they were:

  • 6. DeAndre Jordan
  • 7. Damian Lillard
  • 8. Gerald Green
  • 9. Kyrie Irving
  • 10. Paul George​


VIDEO: The second five in the Stars of the NBA.com Top 10 poll

Summer Dreaming: First-time All-Stars

The regular season will only be a few weeks old when the ballots will go out for the 2015 NBA All-Star Game. Most of the voters won’t even have to think about the first handful of names they’ll fill in:

LeBron James. Carmelo Anthony. Kevin Durant. Kobe Bryant.

Everybody wants to see the marquee stars. Nothing at all wrong with that.

But with only 24 roster spots in a league with 450 players, a few deserving players get overlooked. Sometimes for an entire career. It happened over 17 seasons, 1,199 games and 19,202 points for one of our all-time favorites, Eddie Johnson.

So in honor of Eddie, here in the Summer Dreaming headquarters, we’re going to pour a frosty drink and raise a toast to the players most deserving to make their All-Star debuts at New York in February:


VIDEO: Kawhi Leonard’s top 10 plays of 2013-14

Kawhi Leonard, Spurs – Go figure. He’s got the Bill Russell Trophy for being named MVP of the NBA Finals sitting on his mantle, yet Leonard has not yet been named to an All-Star team in three years in the league. Of course, a big part of that is the cap that coach Gregg Popovich puts on the minutes of all of the Spurs. That doesn’t allow for those eye-popping stats that get the attention of voters. But you’d think the coaches would recognize all the things he does at both ends of the floor and add him as a reserve.


VIDEO: DeMarcus Cousins puts up 29 points, nine boards and six steals on Suns

DeMarcus Cousins, Kings – Let’s just admit it. The 2014 All-Star Game was played in New Orleans and that was what got the Pelicans’ Anthony Davis the Western Conference substitute nod over Cousins. You don’t have to dive into advanced metrics. Just know that Cousins outscored Davis 22.7 to 20.8, out rebounded him 11.7 to 10 and ranked third in the league in double-doubles with 53. Of course, Boogie hasn’t gotten the respect because he hasn’t always had his head in the game, or been the best of teammates. But if he just goes back to work, it will be time to end the Kings All-Star drought that goes back to Peja Stojakovic and Brad Miller in 2004.


VIDEO: Mike Conley has grown into a solid leader for the Grizzlies

Mike Conley, Grizzlies — He’s been flying beneath the radar for far too long, playing at an All-Star level for at least the past two seasons. The No. 4 pick in the 2007 NBA Draft has steadily grown from a tentative young player into a solid quarterback that can run the show, get to the hoop and hit 3-pointers at a respectable rate. The trouble is a numbers game. For one, he plays in the Western Conference, which is teeming with top flight point guards — Chris Paul, Tony Parker, Steph Curry, Russell Westbrook, Damian Lillard. For another, his rep takes a backseat to the 1-2 front court punch of Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol. It’s about time Conley got some love.


VIDEO: Al Jefferson spends time with Dennis Scott

Al Jefferson, Hornets — If only the voters who gave Jefferson’s spot on the Eastern Conference team last season to Roy Hibbert could have known that the Pacers center was preparing to do a swan dive down the stretch. Much credit to first year coach Steve Clifford for giving the former Bobcats an identity and to Kemba Walker for delivering, as usual. But it was Big Al who set himself up in the middle in Charlotte and went to work, toiling and scoring and rebounding the way he has for 10 seasons. He averaged a double-double (21.8 points, 10.8 rebounds). Sometimes the guys who carry their lunch buckets to work every day should be invited to the banquet and given a chance to sit at the head table.


VIDEO: ‘The Serge Protector’ turns away eight shots against the Pelicans

Serge Ibaka, Thunder — Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant. It’s almost like they’re a single entity, because you rarely hear one name mentioned without the other. Meanwhile there’s that jumping jack just out of the spotlight who is deserving of All-Star billing, giving the Thunder the “Big Three” punch to be a top title contender year in and year out. Until the Thunder break through and win a championship, it’s not likely that fan voters or the coaches are going to give Ibaka much respect. They should. The Spurs did in Games 3 and 4 of the Western Conference finals. He’s led the league in blocks twice, is a three time All-Defensive First Team member, dunks like he’s mad at the rim and, oh, there’s also that jumper.


VIDEO: DeAndre Jordan’s top 10 plays of 2013-14

DeAndre Jordan, Clippers — It’s funny how your numbers and value to the team can go up when you simply get more minutes. Coach Doc Rivers came to town and got in Jordan’s ear and his head and demanded more. The former part-time highlight reel star delivered with a solid 35 minutes a game. Maybe the All-Star voters and the coaches still questioned whether he could keep it up at the midway point of last season. He did, leading the league in rebounds (13.6), finishing third in blocked shot (2.48) and eighth in double-doubles (42). Chris Paul and Blake Griffin are the engines in the Clippers’ machine, but it’s Jordan delivering consistently as a defensive stopper that can fuel a rise to a championship.

Summer Dreaming: D Player of the Year

Oklahoma City's Serge Ibaka led the NBA in total blocks in 2013-14. (Richard Rowe/NBAE)

Oklahoma City’s Serge Ibaka led the NBA in total blocks in 2013-14. (Richard Rowe/NBAE)

There are so many different ways to fully embrace the dog days of summer. One is to fire up the grill and start cooking. Another is to keep that blender full of ice.

Here, we’re talking basketball. The season openers are still more than two months away, but it’s never too early to look ahead. So here are my Summer Dreaming choices for 2014-15 Defensive Player of the Year.

Send me your picks.

Serge Ibaka, Thunder — If you don’t think he’s a game-changer, then you weren’t paying attention last spring when the Serge Protector missed the first two games of the Western Conference finals and the Spurs were able to run a virtual lay-up line through the heart of the OKC defense. When Ibaka returned from a calf injury, all of a sudden it wasn’t so easy for Tony Parker and his friends to get to the basket and the series was quickly tied up 2-2. Ibaka protects the rim, contests jumpers and puts the bite into the Thunder. He’s continuing to blossom as an offensive force, but it’s his defense that is the glue of the Thunder. He led the league in total blocks for the fourth straight time last season and has been voted to the All-Defensive first team three years in a row. It’s finally his turn to get the big hardware.

Anthony Davis, Pelicans — Was it really fair to bring him into the league carrying comparisons to the legendary Bill Russell? Well, maybe if you watch the highlight video from last season. With coach Monty Williams taking the shackles off his playing time, A.D. showed many of the skills that made him the No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft. For all that he was able to do with the ball around the basket, it was the defensive plays that dropped your jaw to the floor. He guarded the paint. He cut off baseline drives. Davis seemed to swoop in from out of nowhere to reject even 3-point attempts from the corner. No place on the court was safe from the ballhawking shot-blocker. Now with rim-protecting center Omer Asik at his back, Davis might really cut loose challenging shots. That’s just scary.

Dwight Howard, Rockets – He practically owned this award, winning it three straight times from 2009-2011 in Orlando, but that was before everything went south with the Magic and he had to overcome back problems and questions about commitment to the game. Howard arrived for his first season in Houston fit and ready to re-establish himself. By the end of 2013-14 there were no more questions about his health and desire to get back to the old form. Howard’s 2.83 blocks per game led the league as he returned to being a stopper anyplace around the basket. He’s got 10 years of NBA experience but is still just 28. There’s no reason that the Rockets can’t count on him to be the defensive anchor in their push to be true contenders in the Western Conference.

Joakim Noah, Bulls — Defense can’t always be measured by numbers and quantified with stats. As the 2013-14 Defensive Player of the Year, Noah blocked just 1.4 shots per game. But he had a nose to go after every shot at the rim, was firm in guarding the pick-and-roll and with his sheer energy and physical force was as disruptive as a twister to any opposing offense. He’s hungry, he’s relentless, he’s challenging the ball anywhere on the court, he’s the epitome of the attitude that coach Tom Thibodeau wants and is at the heart of the Bulls defense that ranked No. 2 in the league last season. You can’t ever ignore Noah. He simply won’t let you.

DeAndre Jordan, Clippers – The Clippers’ big man got special attention from the boss in coach Doc Rivers’ first season in L.A. and it paid off tremendously. Rivers expected more from Jordan, demanded more … and usually got it. Jordan’s sixth NBA season produced dramatic improvement as he accepted responsibility to be a core performer. He finished second in the NBA in blocked shots per game (2.54) and third in rebounding (12.5). One of the main reasons that point guard Chris Paul can spend so much time jumping passing lanes looking for steals and the Clippers can be so aggressive on the perimeter is because they know they’ve got Jordan watching their backs with those long, lethal arms.

Clips rejoice as Hurricane Steve blows in

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Steve Ballmer get the Clippers’ crowd fired up at the team’s pep rally

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – The Los Angeles Clippers won’t be changing their name. But if they were, Hurricanes would be appropriate.

L.A. is known for earthquakes, not howling tropical storms. But the latter is exactly what comes to mind after the franchise’s new owner blew into the city Monday afternoon.

Hurricane Steve.

Clippers players on stage at Staples Center on Monday couldn’t help but smile wide and long as they welcomed new owner Steve Ballmer. Some covered their mouths as they chuckled under their breath. Others cocked their heads in wonderment as this big, bouncing, balding billionaire bellowed into the microphone during a rally attended by nearly 5,000 fans.

The fans were issued T-shirts that read, simply: “It’s A New Day.”

Hurricane Steve barreled out of an arena tunnel like a bull unleashed in the streets of Pamplona. Eminem’s raucous “Lose Yourself” blared as he fervently clapped his hands, slapped high-fives with fans and double-pumped his fists as if he’d just been called to come on down as the next contestant on the “Price is Right.”

“When he came through the crowd, I literally had goose bumps,” said Clippers All-Star forward Blake Griffin, who was joined by coach Doc Rivers and teammates Chris Paul, DeAndre Jordan, Matt Barnes and others on stage. “I don’t know if there’s one good word to describe him. I know all our guys are excited about the energy he brings. It’s completely different.”

Ballmer’s price to acquire the team from banned-for-life former owner Donald Sterling was huge, a record $2 billion. This for a franchise that for most of Sterling’s 33 years of ownership was labeled as the worst-run organization in all of sports.

But that started to change over the last few years. Sterling paid Griffin. He paid Paul. He paid to get Rivers from Boston to ensure keeping Paul. Before that he paid $50 million to build a state-of-the-art training facility in L.A.’s upscale Playa Vista neighborhood. There were other signs of fiscal change, too, that raised curiosity within the organization.

Former Clippers center Chris Kaman was drafted sixth overall by L.A. in 2003 , playing there for eight seasons before being traded to New Orleans in the deal that gifted Paul to the Clippers in December 2011, following the lockout. In a 2012 interview, a year after the trade, Kaman reflected on how far the franchise had come:  “The worst possible franchise in NBA and all sports history … to one of the top ones.”

He then quipped that such a transformation could really go the distance, “if Sterling sold the team.”

Well … hey.

Ironically, after decades of stinginess, the surfacing of Sterling’s better judgment in running the team has set up the giddy Ballmer with the most talented, most championship-ready roster in the franchise’s history in L.A. Paul and Griffin are locked in for the next four years. Rivers isn’t going anywhere. Ballmer, the former Microsoft CEO from Seattle, promised Clippers fans the team isn’t going anywhere either. He said he loves Seattle, but he loves L.A., too, and he won’t move the team “for a hundred reasons.”

He said at least a hundred more things that drew applause as his booming voice grew hoarse.

It is a new day in Clipperland. A much different day.

Hurricane Steve will take it from here.