Posts Tagged ‘DeAndre Jordan’

Morning shootaround — July 2


VIDEO: What were the best signings from the first day of free agency?

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JULY 2 ON NBA TV: Free Agent Fever: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET ***

DAY 1: Complete Free Agency Recap

Spending spree marks first day of free agency | Report: Lakers fail to impress Aldridge; Blazers hoping for Aldridge-Monroe combo | Report: Three guards on Kings’ wish list | Clippers hoping Pierce deal leads Jordan to return | West reveals why he’s leaving Indiana

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Recapping a busy Day 1 of free agency — The chatter during yesterday’s free-agent period opened, essentially, with Damian Lillard and the Trail Blazers talking about a long-term extension. By the time 1 a.m. or so rolled around today, it’s hard to keep tabs on just how many actual free agents agreed to deals. From the big names (Kevin Love, Paul Pierce, Paul Millsap) to the mid-range ones (DeMarre Carroll, Danny Green, Tristan Thompson) to smaller ones (Kyle Singler, Brandan Wright), moves were happening constantly. Our Steve Aschburner tries to make sense of what was a crazy busy day: 

“Unfinished business” was the term Kevin Love used, more or less kicking off the first day of NBA free agency Wednesday with his announcement, via The Players’ Tribune, that he would be sticking with Cleveland Cavaliers in pursuit of LeBron James-led championships.

“Irrational exuberance,” though, was the label that came to mind as the shopping and the bidding and the spending (pledges of it, anyway, when deals actually can be consummated July 9) spiraled ever higher. That phrase was former Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan‘s, used to characterize the overheated stock market during the dot.com bubble of the 1990s.

From Love and Cleveland teammates Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert to San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, from young franchise cornerstones such as Anthony Davis and Damian Lillard to DeMarre Carroll becoming Toronto’s highest paid player, the frenzy to find, pitch and lock up players at heretofore staggering amounts of money was more than even some players could grasp.

With so much of the NBA’s business focused on the summer of 2016 – when the revenue from broadcast rights increases geometrically, taking the salary cap from about $69 million to an estimated $90 million – owners and general managers dug deep to cut deals at 2015 prices. Or, more accurately, at 2015’s percentage of payroll.

Look at it this way: an $11 million player by 2016-17, for example, will eat up the same amount of cap space as a $7.7 player this past season ($63 million cap). That could turn a number of Wednesday’s personal lottery payoffs into something if not reasonable by an average Joe’s or Jill’s standards, at least into something manageable.

One of the surprises of the day, then, was that so many players were willing to lock in rather than hold off or “gimmick-contract” their way to another bite at the platinum apple in a year or two. Love, perhaps thinking of his own troubling history of injuries, went “all in” with the Cavaliers, grabbing a deal that will still be in effect when James turns 35. Davis dried up the premature drooling in Chicago and probably 28 other markets by teams and fans hoping to pry him loose from New Orleans sooner than 2021.

Here was another surprise: Of the top 15 or so players who agreed to terms Wednesday, 10 or more (depending on your rankings) chose to stay put, re-signing with their current teams. Of those who will be playing elsewhere come autumn, Tyson Chandler‘s four-year, $52 million deal with Phoenix and Carroll’s four-year, $60 million package with the Raptors probably rate as the biggest moves.


VIDEO: What were the under-the-radar moves from Day 1?

*** (more…)

Free agents ‘at 2015 prices’ trigger NBA’s Day 1 spending spree


VIDEO: Free agents winners and losers after Day 1

“Unfinished business” was the term Kevin Love used, more or less kicking off the first day of NBA free agency Wednesday with his announcement, via The Players’ Tribune, that he would be sticking with Cleveland Cavaliers in pursuit of LeBron James-led championships.

“Irrational exuberance,” though, was the label that came to mind as the shopping and the bidding and the spending (pledges of it, anyway, when deals actually can be consummated July 9) spiraled ever higher. That phrase was former Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan‘s, used to characterize the overheated stock market during the dot.com bubble of the 1990s.

From Love and Cleveland teammates Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert to San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, from young franchise cornerstones such as Anthony Davis and Damian Lillard to DeMarre Carroll becoming Toronto’s highest paid player, the frenzy to find, pitch and lock up players at heretofore staggering amounts of money was more than even some players could grasp:

By 7 p.m. Eastern time, with several agreed-upon deals to go, NBA teams had committed approximately $1.1 billion dollars to players who hit the open market at 12:01 a.m. Among the biggest contracts: Love’s five-year, $110 million to stay with Cleveland, Davis’ five-year, $145 million extension to play for the Pelicans for the next six seasons and Lillard’s $120 million over five years to serve, perhaps, as Portland’s last tent-pole player as the Blazers face a potential rebuild.
And just because that sort of spending wasn’t unprecedented …

… doesn’t mean it wasn’t breathtaking.

With so much of the NBA’s business focused on the summer of 2016 – when the revenue from broadcast rights increases geometrically, taking the salary cap from about $69 million to an estimated $90 million – owners and general managers dug deep to cut deals at 2015 prices. Or, more accurately, at 2015’s percentage of payroll.

Look at it this way: an $11 million player by 2016-17, for example, will eat up the same amount of cap space as a $7.7 player this past season ($63 million cap). That could turn a number of Wednesday’s personal lottery payoffs into something if not reasonable by an average Joe’s or Jill’s standards, at least into something manageable.

One of the surprises of the day, then, was that so many players were willing to lock in rather than hold off or “gimmick-contract” their way to another bite at the platinum apple in a year or two. Love, perhaps thinking of his own troubling history of injuries, went “all in” with the Cavaliers, grabbing a deal that will still be in effect when James turns 35. Davis dried up the premature drooling in Chicago and probably 28 other markets by teams and fans hoping to pry him loose from New Orleans sooner than 2021.

Here was another surprise: Of the top 15 or so players who agreed to terms Wednesday, 10 or more (depending on your rankings) chose to stay put, re-signing with their current teams. Of those who will be playing elsewhere come autumn, Tyson Chandler‘s four-year, $52 million deal with Phoenix and Carroll’s four-year, $60 million package with the Raptors probably rate as the biggest moves.

(It will be interesting to see Carroll playing north of the border, technically making him an international player. He’s the guy who, when asked during the Eastern Conference finals what he might say to Cleveland’s feisty Matthew Dellavedova about his reckless play, wondered if the “foreigner” even spoke English. Like Australians, Carroll will learn, Canadians mostly speak English too.)

There was, of course, plenty of unfinished business. LaMarcus Aldridge was the straw stirring Wednesday’s drink, even as his interviewing of teams continued. San Antonio emerged as a likely destination for the All-Star power forward, if he does leave Portland, with the Spurs pitching a baton hand-off from Tim Duncan to Aldridge and a makeover on the fly with Leonard and the team’s aging core still formidable enough to contend.

Things didn’t go well, apparently, for the Los Angeles Lakers in their wooing of Aldridge. Word leaked almost immediately that the Blazers’ big man was unimpressed by a lack of vision for the on-the-court product. Glitz alone didn’t look as if it would cut it, with the Lakers said to be dropped from Aldridge’s list.

Other names remain in play: Marc Gasol, Greg Monroe, DeAndre Jordan, Monta Ellis, Wesley Matthews, Rajon Rondo, Reggie Jackson, Dwyane Wade and James himself. Draymond Green reportedly got a deal done later in the day with Golden State, suffering a hiccup or two more than Leonard or Jimmy Butler as a restricted player who wasn’t required to secure an offer sheet elsewhere.

The Lakers had their Aldridge embarrassment while their East Coast counterparts as marquee franchise mired in current muck, the New York Knicks, registered barely a blip on Day 1. In the NBA of 2015, the Cleveland Cavaliers committed in excess of $230 million to three players (Love, Thompson, Shumpert) while the Knicks looked to have trouble getting people even to take their calls.

That all could change Thursday, naturally. And we’re pretty certain to see fireworks Friday and Saturday, on both the Old Glory and new money fronts.

Blogtable: Where will these top free agents land?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Where are these 5 going? | Best/worst free-agent move ahead? | Assessing 2015 Draft



VIDEOThe Starters discuss where the top free agents may end up

> Tell us where the following five big-name free agents — LaMarcus Aldridge, Marc Gasol, DeAndre Jordan, Draymond Green and Dwyane Wade — will be playing come 2015-16 and a quick reason why they are going there.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com

LaMarcus Aldridge – San Antonio Spurs. It sounds like he’s leaving Portland regardless, and the Spurs can lock in on him with the salesmanship of their heavy hitters (Gregg Popovich, Tim Duncan) and the closest thing in this league to guaranteed winning.
Marc Gasol – Memphis Grizzzlies. Meeting with just one team, in the city in which he’s grown up and found success, seems like a simple choice.
DeAndre Jordan – L.A. Clippers. The man with bottomless pockets, Steve Ballmer, and the NBA’s most persuasive voice, Doc Rivers, will, er, twist Jordan’s arm to take the max deal, max length.
Draymond Green – Golden State. Green is worth more to the Warriors, in their system, than he is to any other team. They know it, he knows it. No grass is Greener.
Dwyane Wade – Miami Heat. If Wade wants to be Joe Montana quarterbacking Kansas City, Bobby Orr with the Blackhawks or Hakeem Olajuwon as a Raptor, sure, he should go with his pride and sign elsewhere

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com

LaMarcus Aldridge — San Antonio Spurs. The native Texan gets to return home in the perfect place to contend for a championship next season with Tim Duncan and move ahead toward more with Kawhi Leonard.  It’s a seamless transition as L.A. approaches his 30th birthday.
Marc Gasol — Memphis Grizzlies. He’s comfortable and he’s loyal.  Did I mention he’s comfortable and he’s loyal?
DeAndre JordanDallas Mavericks. He wants out of playing third fiddle behind Chris Paul and Blake Griffin, even though it’s a foolish decision that moves him farther from a championship and will expose him as less than a leading man.  But he’ll fall in love with Mark Cuban’s wooing.
Draymond GreenGolden State Warriors. Really?  You have to ask?
Dwyane WadeMiami Heat. If it’s about money, which Wade seems to indicate it is, he’ll eventually realize there’s still more of it to be had with the Heat than anyplace else

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Aldridge will be going to the Spurs, because he is tired of being on one of the better teams in the West and wants to be somewhere with the track record of getting to the very top, and maybe, just maybe, because he wants to get away from the increasing Damian Lillard spotlight. I think LMA is leaving, it’s just a matter of where. It’s more like 50-50 for a DeAndre Jordan departure from the Clippers. I would not be surprised if he stays, would not be surprised if he goes. And if he does go: Mavericks. Wade probably stays in Miami. Gasol definitely stays in Memphis, Green definitely stays in Oakland.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com

LaMarcus AldridgeSan Antonio Spurs. It’s an hour from his home in Austin and he’d immediately make the Spurs a strong favorite. Because Aldridge made big money on his last contract, he doesn’t need to squeeze the last dime (that’s not The Spurs Way anyway) and he’d benefit from no state tax. If they get Aldridge, Tim Duncan may sign up for two more years.
Marc GasolMemphis Grizzlies. He went to high school in Memphis and spent his entire NBA career in Memphis. He’s Memphis.
DeAndre JordanLos Angeles Clippers. I don’t buy whispers about him beefing with Chris Paul and wanting to be a go-to guy offensively.
Draymond GreenGolden State Warriors. He won’t find more money and a bigger role anywhere else.
Dwyane WadeMiami Heat. He’s not throwing away all that goodwill, and besides, they’ll find a cushy gig for him when he retires

John Schuhmann, NBA.com

LaMarcus AldridgeSan Antonio Spurs, because it’s the organization that every player should want to join.
Marc GasolMemphis Grizzlies, because he’s got a pretty good thing going there.
DeAndre JordanLos Angeles Clippers. See Gasol, Marc. If Jordan goes elsewhere, he’s really going to miss Chris Paul and Blake Griffin.
Draymond GreenGolden State Warriors. He’s a restricted free agent, and the Warriors will obviously match any offer.
Dwyane WadeMiami Heat, because of loyalty and money, but also because that will be a pretty good team next season.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com

LaMarcus AldridgeL.A. Lakers, where he can serve as the bridge star from the end of the Kobe Bryant era to the future for the Lakers.
Marc GasolMemphis Grizzlies, where he remains the face and backbone of the grit and grind movement.
DeAndre JordanDallas Mavericks, where he can find the bigger role and environment he seeks.
Draymond GreenGolden State Warriors, because you don’t leave a championship situation where you fit perfectly.
Dwyane WadeMiami Heat, because his value is greater (at this stage of his career) than it is anywhere else.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: I believe all will be staying put. Aldridge will be passing up too much money to leave Portland, and he possesses a powerful role within the organization that cannot be replicated elsewhere. Gasol is at home in Memphis and is not to be lured by the more glamorous markets. Why would Jordan leave the Clippers? It is a destination franchise in the league’s most compelling market with championship hopes – in addition to the ability to pay him more than anyone else. Green isn’t leaving a championship team that has the right to match any offer. Wade and the Heat need one another and will ultimately come to an agreement, I believe.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog

LaMarcus AldridgeSan Antonio Spurs, because he’s a Texas guy and this is his best opportunity at winning.
Marc GasolMemphis Grizzlies, because it makes perfect sense for him to stay.
DeAndre JordanDallas Mavericks, because owner Mark Cuban has swung and missed a lot the last few years, and he’s due for a home run … well, maybe a stand-up double.
Draymond GreenGolden State Warriors, because he ain’t going anywhere else.
Dwyane WadeMiami Heat, because I think Wade will discover the big money market may be sparse for a 33-year-old with bad knees who can’t shoot threes.

Morning shootaround — July 1


VIDEO: David Aldridge breaks down the state of the unrestricted free agents

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JULY 1 ON NBA TV ***

Free Agent Fever at 8 a.m. ET, 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET, and again from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET 

Report: Aldridge meeting with Lakers went ‘well’ | Kings chasing Lin, Rondo | Report: Lakers plan to meet with Love | Report: Cavs reach out to Prince; Williams hopes for return | Report: Ellis, Pacers in talks | Report: Nets finalizing deals with Lopez, Young

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Report: Aldridge’s meeting with Lakers goes ‘really well’  The NBA’s free agency period opened last night with the usual — a lot of talk, a handful of moves and a stage set for an even bigger Day 2 of the chatter. LaMarcus Aldridge of the Trail Blazers is the No. 1 target, of course, and met with the Los Angeles Lakers last night and, according to ESPN.com, the report went as well as it could for both sides:

The Los Angeles Lakers were the first to sit down with LaMarcus Aldridge when free agency opened Tuesday night, and their meeting lasted nearly two hours, sources told ESPN.com.

The meeting went “really well,” a source who was in the room for the Lakers’ presentation told ESPN.com’s Ramona Shelburne.

“LaMarcus seemed completely focused,” a source told Shelburne.

The Lakers’ contingent included Kobe Bryant, president Jeanie Buss and general managerMitch Kupchak.

The Houston Rockets met with Aldridge after the Lakers.

Aldridge also will meet with the San Antonio Spurs, Dallas Mavericks, Phoenix Suns and Toronto Raptors on Wednesday and with the New York Knicks on Thursday, league sources told ESPN.com.

According to one source, the chance of Aldridge staying with the Portland Trail Blazers is “very unlikely.”

ESPN.com reported in May that the Spurs and Mavericks strongly believe they’ll have a great shot to lure Aldridge back to his home state of Texas. But sources said last week that Aldridge is actually thinking more and more about a free-agent jump to the Lakers.

The Lakers, sources added, firmly believe they will now be in the Aldridge hunt. And there is a rising sentiment, sources said, that the Lakers have edged past the Mavericks on Aldridge’s wish list even though he was a high school star in Dallas.

The Spurs, sources say, continue to be Aldridge’s most likely destination if he goes through with the idea of leaving the Blazers to start anew.

*** (more…)

2015 Free Agent Fever

A free-agent derby that lacks superstar power but could redefine the landscape of the West is set to begin Tuesday at midnight ET amid the possibility that several of the top teams from the conference are on the verge of dramatic change, and not necessarily for the better.

The same point could be made most every July, except that the start of negotiations this time comes with the additional twist that a couple of the headliners with the best chance to leave their current team may switch to a club within the conference: LaMarcus Aldridge of the Trail Blazers meeting first with the Lakers and expected to also consider the Spurs and Mavericks, and DeAndre Jordan of the Clippers reportedly eyeing a potential move to the Mavericks. Whether Aldridge stays or goes obviously has a major impact for Portland, in other words, but if the destination is another team in the West’s upper echelon, the decision is a dual shakeup.

The Warriors are one of the few teams near the top to be immune — and the champions are at the very top — with every indication still that Draymond Green is a lock to return. That has been the case for months, the only uncertainty being whether it would be with a new contract directly from Golden State or by Golden State matching an offer sheet.

The same goes for Kawhi Leonard, another restricted free agent, and the automatic of his next deal in San Antonio. Among the unrestricteds, all signs point to Marc Gasol re-signing in Memphis without seriously considering other opportunities. (Just as the biggest name of all on the market, LeBron James, isn’t really considered to be on the market with the strong signals he will be back in Cleveland.)

Beyond that, though, the conference could be on the verge of shifting, starting tonight. What would an Aldridge departure, if it happens, mean for the decision for the stay-or-go decision in front of Wesley Matthews? What other moves will the Spurs have to make to manage the cap enough to keep Danny Green, in line for a big payday? How will the Clippers respond if Jordan leaves, after coach Doc Rivers spent two seasons proclaiming Jordan as essentially irreplaceable. On and on.

Tonight is the start of negotiations, and also the start of the implications. In many cases, losing a free agent may be more than losing a free agent. It could be a direct rival getting better in the process, a double hit.

Kings have Green, Rondo on wish list, 7:11 a.m.

Bucks hold 2 a.m. meeting with Monroe, 7:10 a.m.

Aminu’s deal setting bar for others, 6:41 a.m.

Pacers to meet with Ellis today, 6:21 a.m.

Pacers making push for Ellis, 1:30 a.m.

But the Pacers aren’t the only ones interested…

Aminu heading to Portland, 12:42 a.m.

Spurs, Leonard agree on framework, 12:06 a.m.

Davis tweets he is staying put, 12:02 a.m.

Davis agree to max deal with N.O., 12:01 a.m.

Celtics trying to reach Love, 11:39 p.m.

Lakers, Love to chat this week, 11:11 p.m.

Lakers looking at centers, 11:08 p.m.

Wade met with Heat brass, twice, 10:20 p.m.

Kings, Rondo have mutual interest 9:57 p.m.

Mavs set to meet with Aldridge, Jordan, 9:52 p.m.

 

 

 

Top 5 Free Agents of 2015 (by position)

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — This time two days from now, we’ll be in the throes of the wild and wacky Free Agency season that marks every NBA summer. Who will change addresses? Who will stay put? Who knows. What we do know is that these are the players, in one man’s opinion, that are sure to be on the wish lists of teams with salary cap space to spare this offseason.

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JUNE 30 ON NBA TV: The Starters, 6:30 ET | Free Agent Fever, 7 ET & 11:30 ET ***

Point Guards


VIDEO: Goran Dragic puts up a fantastic game against the Suns in Miami

1. Goran Dragic, Miami Heat (Unrestricted Free Agent, Player Option) — The mercurial Dragic is the template for the modern point guard and will be treated as such by suitors this summer.

2. Reggie Jackson, Detroit Pistons (Restricted Free Agent) — Young (25) and just scratching the surface of what he can do running a team as a starter.

3. Brandon Knight, Phoenix Suns (RFA) — More scorer than facilitator, Knight is an ideal fit alongside Eric Bledsoe in the Suns’ up-tempo attack.

4. Rajon Rondo, Dallas Mavericks (UFA) — Will a disastrous finish to his season in Dallas cost the hard-nosed Rondo this summer?

5. Ish Smith, Philadelphia 76ers (UFA) — Quality production in limited opportunities suggest there is much more to Smith’s game than meets the eye.

Shooting Guards


VIDEO: Jimmy Butler was the Kia Most Improved Player of the Year Award winner in 2014-15

1. Jimmy Butler, Chicago Bulls (RFA) — The top guard, regardless of position, on the market this summer, Butler gambled on himself and it should pay off handsomely.

2. Dwyane Wade, Miami Heat (UFA, Player Option) — Even at 33 with all of the wear and tear of 12 seasons in the league, Wade remains one of the league’s most versatile and dynamic players.

3. Danny Green, San Antonio Spurs (UFA) — An ideal fit for the role he played with the Spurs, Green’s skill-set is a fit anywhere in today’s NBA.

4. Monta Ellis, Dallas Mavericks (UFA) — Another casualty of a somewhat lost season in Dallas, Ellis in search of the right fit for a tweener who shot just 28 percent from deep last season.

5. Wesley Matthews, Portland Trail Blazers (UFA) — An Achilles injury ended his season early, but the rugged and relentless Matthews remains a top priority for the Trail Blazers.

Centers


VIDEO: Marc Gasol has become the focal point of a contending team in Memphis

1. Marc Gasol, Memphis Grizzlies (UFA) — The Grizzlies’ famed grit-and-grind approach does not work without their All-NBA center in the middle of the mix.

2. DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers (UFA) — A defensive force in need of an offensive arsenal to match, Jordan’s not a lock to return to Los Angeles … at least not with the Clippers.

3. Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs (UFA) — Still near the top of his and the big man game after 18 outstanding seasons in the league, Duncan has the energy for at least one more title chase.

4. Greg Monroe, Detroit Pistons (UFA) — Monroe is the ideal 5-man for the small-ball era, with his face-up game and ability to bang in the paint.

5. Brook Lopez, Brooklyn Nets (UFA) — An elite scorer, Lopez is still coveted in a game that isn’t as reliant on dominant big men as it once was.

Small Forwards


VIDEO: LeBron James’ best plays from the 2015 playoffs

1. LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers (UFA, Player Option) — The best player on the planet will be paid as such while also leveraging his power to affect change (on the roster and beyond) in Cleveland.

2. Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs (RFA) — The future of the program in San Antonio, Leonard is poised to become the leader of the pack in every way imaginable for the Spurs.

3. DeMarre Carroll, Atlanta Hawks (UFA) — His development as a knock-down (40 percent) shooter from beyond the 3-point line adds to his versatility and value on the open market.

4. Tobias Harris, Orlando Magic (RFA) — Harris has loads of admirers in front offices around the league, folks who appreciate his production for a young (22) hybrid who has still has a high ceiling.

5. Khris Middleton, Milwaukee Bucks (RFA) — A knock down shooter from deep (41 percent) and from the line (86 percent), Middleton showed his mettle in the postseason by serving as the Bucks’ catalyst.

Power Forwards


VIDEO: LaMarcus Aldridge’s highlights from 2014-15

1. LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland Trail Blazers (UFA) — Aldridge is everything a team could want in a modern power forward, complete with range to the 3-point line and the ability to dominate inside as well.

2. Kevin Love, Cleveland Cavaliers (UFA, Player Option) — The Cavaliers’ Finals run without him was revealing, but also a reminder of what they were lacking without the ultimate floor-spacer in the lineup.

3. Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks (UFA) — Few players have raised their stock the past two seasons the way Millsap did by assuming a dominant role for a Hawks team that rolled to the best season in franchise history.

4. Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors (RFA) — The Warriors’ championship, and Green’s role in helping make it happen, will be factored into the huge raise he is set to cash in on this summer.

5. Tristan Thompson, Cleveland Cavaliers (RFA) — A ringing endorsement from LeBron James always helps, but wasn’t needed for a player who dominated the glass the way Thompson did in the playoffs.

Morning Shootaround — June 27


VIDEO: The Knicks’ bold move to Draft Kristaps Porzingis will have long-lasting ramifications for the franchise

NEWS OF THE MORNING

July is even bigger than June for the Cleveland Cavaliers | Four-team race for DeAndre Jordan’s services | Sixers’ concerns about Embiid growing | Upset ‘Melo or not, Porzingis was right pick for Knicks

No. 1: July is even bigger than June for the Cleveland Cavaliers  Playing for a championship is one thing. Playing for the right to contend for more in the future, however, is another beast altogether. The Cleveland Cavaliers are just days away from a colossal offseason, a July even bigger than the June that saw them scrap and claw their way to within two wins of winning the NBA title, that rests on the franchise’s ability to master free agency. Kevin Love, Tristan Thompson, J.R. Smith and whoever else needs tending to will be the focus for the Cavaliers and certainly LeBron James. Terry Pluto of the Plain Dealer sets the summer table for the Cavaliers:

1. I don’t expect J.R. Smith to be back with the Cavs. He turned down his $6.4 million player option, and is looking for a raise with a long-term deal. I doubt the Cavs would want Smith on an extended contract. His emotions are on edge. He was one more flagrant foul away from being suspended in the playoffs. Smith is best on a short-term deal. Smith is an unrestricted free agent.

2. Now that the Cavs will have a huge payroll, they would much prefer to keep Iman Shumpert over Smith. Shumpert is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavs can match any offer that he receives. They will extend the $3.9 million qualifying offer to the guard and try to work out a long-term deal.

3. Look for the Cavaliers to offer maximum contracts to both Kevin Love and Tristan Thompson. The two deals will be different because they are at different stages of their career. Love can receive a five-year deal in the $100 million range. The Cavs think Love will give it serious consideration. It’s possible that Love will sign a  “1-and-1″ contract. It would pay him the maximum salary in 2015-16, and a one-year player option for 2016-17. An agent wants the player option just in case your client has a horrendous injury in 2015-16, so he can at least pocket a maximum salary for 2016-17.

4. The Cavs believe Love came to a comfort level with the team by the end of the season. He knows that this is his best place to contend for a title. The top contenders in the Western Conference don’t have the salary cap room for him. It’s only the struggling or lesser teams (the Lakers, Boston, etc) that may be able to find a way to fit Love into their cap.

5. Love is coming off major shoulder surgery. His is expected to fully recover. He has also dealt with some back problems. Love missed seven regular season games in 2014-15. He missed five in 2013-14. He had a broken hand in 2012-13, missing 65 games. Injuries are a concern, but it’s not as if he has been Anderson Varejao — who simply can’t stay healthy.

6. The summer of 2016 is the “Money Summer.” It’s when the salary cap is expected to increase by at least 30 percent. So a maximum contract to Love this summer is considerably less than a maximum deal a year from now. It’s why LeBron James started the “1-and-1″ deal last summer, and it’s why he’s expected to sign another contract like that this summer with the Cavs.

7. Thompson’s long-term maximum deal would be about $70 million for four years. He is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavs can match any offer that he receives from another team. Does Thompson play for a “qualifying offer” in the $7 million range and aim to be an unrestricted free agent in 2016 when they big money really flows? That’s something his agent Rich Paul (who also represents James) will have to discuss with Thompson. It was Paul and his chief negotiator, Mark Termini, who helped James design the “1-and-1″ contract approach last summer.

 

***

No. 2:Four team race for DeAndre Jordan’s services — So there is a rift between Los Angeles Clippers free agent center DeAndre Jordan and All-Star point guard Chris Paul, or at least that’s the latest smoke rising from Hollywood. Even after Doc Rivers dismissed the rumors that two of his stars were not on the same page all season, the rumblings have not stopped. Jordan’s choice this summer in free agency could very well be influenced by his reportedly deteriorating relationship with Paul. There is apparently a four-team race for Jordan’s services. Broderick Turner of The Los Angeles Times provides some context:

The Clippers’ main focus now is on keeping Jordan.

The season ended with Rivers denying reports Jordan and Chris Paul had a beef with each other.

But other NBA officials not authorized to speak publicly on the matter said there indeed is a rift between Jordan and Paul.

The officials said Jordan wants to be more involved in the offense and wants to be an All-Star, and he’s not sure whether those things can happen on the Clippers with All-Stars Paul and Blake Griffin.

Dallas Mavericks forward Chandler Parsons has been recruiting Jordan, the officials said. The two have been hanging out together in Jordan’s hometown of Houston.

When free agency starts at 9:01 p.m. PDT Tuesday, Jordan will be home in Houston.

The officials said four teams will visit Jordan at home — the Clippers, Lakers, Mavericks and Milwaukee Bucks.

The Clippers can offer Jordan the most security.

He can sign a five-year maximum deal for $108 million with the Clippers. Other teams under the salary cap can offer Jordan a maximum deal of four years for $80 million, with an opt-out clause after the third season.

Jordan can also sign a two-year deal with the Clippers with a player option for after the 2016 season, giving him a starting salary of about $18.8 million for next season.


VIDEO: What’s up with DeAndre Jordan and the Los Angeles Clippers

***

No. 3: Sixers’ concerns about Embiid growing? — Jahlil Okafor was more than just the obvious No. 3 pick in Thursday’s NBA Draft, he was a security pick for the Philadelphia 76ers. With growing concerns about the health and future of Joel Embiid, the 76ers had to make the right choice with that No. 3 pick. Sixers boss Sam Hinkie is as concerned as anyone about his prized big man from the 2014 Draft, writes John Smallwood of The Philadelphia Daily News:

Conspiracy theorists had looked at the timing of the Sixers’ announcement that redshirt rookie center Joel Embiid was not healing as well as anticipated from the foot injury and surgery that cost him last season and determined that it was a smokescreen to hide Hinkie’s true intentions for Thursday’s NBA draft.

Yesterday, that was put to rest. The concerns about Embiid are all too real.

Hinkie said selecting Duke University freshman center Jahlil Okafor third overall was not connected to Embiid’s situation. He said Okafor was the pick because he was the best player available.

But what if there was no issue with Embiid?

“I’d like to think we’d have had the courage to do it anyway,” Hinkie responded when asked if he would have still selected Okafor. “I knew and it’s hard to unknow where things stood with Joel, but I’d like to think we’d have the courage anyway.”

It would almost have been better had it been the mysterious Hinkie talking about Embiid. It would be easier on the concern meter to believe it was just Hinkie being Hinkie and not wanting to divulge any information that he feels might weaken his position.

The troubling thing about this is that it was clear that Hinkie does not know for sure what is going on with Embiid.

“[Embiid] feels really good,” Hinkie said. “That’s part of what makes this, um, maybe confusing is the right word.

“It’s certainly confusing for Joel. He said, ‘I can’t believe how good I feel and I’ve felt great for a while.’ It seems hard to believe that something is wrong.”

Something, however, is wrong – or rather, not quite right.

A CT scan of Embiid’s foot about a week ago led to the Sixers making the infamous Saturday night release saying things weren’t as healed as “anticipated.”

Hinkie pointed out that a year ago, while some had said it would be a 4- to 6-month recovery from surgery to repair the navicular bone in Embiid’s right foot, that he had a more conservative estimate, at that time, of up to 8 months.

Embiid had the surgery on June 20, 2014, which makes it more than 12 months and there are still issues.

“I’ll give a timeline that might help clear some things up but might also help show why we’re looking so hard to try to understand,” Hinkie said. “Joel we’ve watched like a hawk in rehab every day of the year.

“The nature of navicular injuries and the nature of stress fractures is that you see these slow improvements and then you slow [rehabilitation] down and check things.

“Anytime you get any kind of negative feedback, you unload, slow down and re-assess.

“As part of that, we have a set of pro-active MRIs on Joel, and each of those we sent out to a variety of doctors both internally and externally and ask, “What do you think?’ We get the consensus responses and move from there.”

***

No. 4: Upset ‘Melo or not, Porzingis was right pick for Knicks — It doesn’t matter where you come down on the New York Knicks’ Draft night decision to select Kristaps Porzingis over several other more NBA-ready prospects. What’s done is done. And Phil Jackson believes that Porzingis was the right choice, even if his star player, Carmelo Anthony, does not. Porzingis was the only choice, writes Frank Isola of the New York Daily News, for a franchise that can no longer operate strictly for the short-term:

The Daily News first reported on Friday that Anthony is upset over Jackson’s decision to draft Porzingis, a 19-year-old, 7-foot-1 project. Anthony, according to a source, doesn’t understand why Jackson would waste such a high pick on a player who can’t help immediately. That, of course, is just the point. It would be short-sighted of Jackson to draft, for example, Willie Cauley-Stein, who could make a bigger contribution in years one and two.

But when you’re picking that high in the draft, you’re looking for a future All-Star, even if that may not help the only current All-Star on your roster, who is 31 and is coming off major knee surgery.

On Friday, Anthony tweeted: “What’s understood doesn’t need to be spoken upon” #DestiNY #TheFutureIsNow.

Anthony should have considered “the future is now” last summer when his instincts told him to leave New York as a free agent to join a contender. The Chicago Bulls and Houston Rockets were both viable options.

Now Anthony’s stuck with the Knicks, a rebuilding team that barring a few major free agent moves won’t be a playoff team next season. Conversely, the Knicks are stuck with Anthony, his bad knee and his bad contract.

ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith said on SiriusXM Radio on Friday that Anthony feels betrayed and hoodwinked by Jackson.

Anthony is apparently upset specifically with Jackson’s decision to draft Porzingis, telling a close friend “are we supposed to wait two or three years for this guy?”

Since January, Anthony has seen his pal J.R. Smith along with Iman Shumpert get traded to Cleveland. And a Knicks source claims that Anthony called Tim Hardaway Jr. after the third-year player was traded to Atlanta for the draft rights to Jerian Grant to express his displeasure with Jackson’s moves.

“He doesn’t understand it,” the source said.

“The bond between mentor and protégé enables us to stay true to our chosen path,” Anthony tweeted along with a photo of himself and Hardaway smiling.

Knicks officials are aware of Anthony’s feelings about the moves. Early Friday, Jackson was asked if he thought about Anthony when picking Porzingis and said: “Carmelo’s always on my mind. He’s our favorite son.”

***


VIDEO: Pat Riley and the Miami Heat got Justise out of the NBA Draft

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Los Angeles Lakers think they have a good shot at landing LaMarcus Aldridge … Portland’s Neil Olshey has a demanding juggling act that needs completing this summer …  Will the Pacers regret passing on hometown kids Trey Lyles and RJ Hunter?

Morning shootaround — June 24


VIDEO: Are the Warriors looking to make a trade before Thusday’s draft?

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: 90 percent chance Ellis opts out | Divac, Karl address Cousins trade chatter | LeBron staying upbeat after Finals loss

No. 1: Report: 90 percent chance Ellis opts out; Mavs interested in trading him if he opts in — In the two seasons he’s spent in Dallas, Mavericks guard Monta Ellis has done some serious career rehab work. He played in 162 of a possible 164 games in that span, a plus for him after injuries curtailed his career in the past. He meshed nicely with star forward Dirk Nowitzki and was an integral part of two playoff teams in Dallas. Ellis can opt out this summer and pursue free agency, but what if he decides not to do that and stay with the Mavs?

Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News reports that it is 90 percent likely Ellis will opt out and try the free-agent waters:

If he had opted in for the final season of his three-year contract with the Mavericks, there’s a better-than-decent chance he would have been traded, perhaps before Thursday’s draft.

And so, according to a source, Ellis is going to opt out of the final year of his deal and become an unrestricted free agent July 1. The Mavericks are not expected to make a serious run at re-signing him.

Ellis had until Wednesday night to make a decision on his option, to either take the third year of his contract at $8.7 million, or turn that down and try his luck on the open market.

The decision apparently was made late Tuesday night after news broke that the Mavericks were considering trade options if Ellis were to take the final season of his original $25 million deal signed before the 2013-14 season.

Nothing is official until Ellis declares his intentions. But the source said it is 90 percent certain that Ellis will opt out.

Could he change his mind? Possibly. But that would reopen the chance of the Mavericks finding a trade partner and perhaps pairing Ellis with the No. 21 pick they have in Thursday’s draft to try to move up.

Earlier on Tuesday, it appeared the Mavericks were angling to trade Ellis and their draft pick.

Numerous teams have had interest in Ellis in the past.

The New York Knicks have had an affinity for Ellis. Other teams, such as Denver, Indiana, the LA Lakers and Sacramento, would seem to be logical fits for Ellis. Those teams all have higher draft picks than the Mavericks.

ESPN.com’s Tim MacMahon reports that the Mavs would definitely look to move Ellis should he opt in so as to free up salary cap space to chase LaMarcus Aldridge and DeAndre Jordan:

The Dallas Mavericks will explore trade scenarios for shooting guard Monta Ellis if he exercises his player option for next season, sources told ESPN.com.

If Ellis opts in, Dallas would attempt to trade him for a draft pick, a source said, allowing the Mavs to maximize their cap space entering free agency.

Dallas intends to pursue All-Star power forward LaMarcus Aldridge and third-team All-NBA center DeAndre Jordan in free agency, hoping to sign one of them to a max contract. If Ellis’ salary isn’t on the books, the Mavs likely will have enough cap space to re-sign center Tyson Chandler to pair with Aldridge or a shooting guard who is a better fit with small forward Chandler Parsons if Jordan comes to Dallas.

The 6-foot-3 Ellis, an undersized shooting guard who is one of the league’s most dynamic off-the-dribble threats, played a key role in the Mavs winning a total of 99 games and advancing to the playoffs in each of the past two seasons after Dallas’ one-year postseason absence.

But Dallas doesn’t intend to give Ellis the raise he’d want if he tests free agency, sources said. The Mavs, who plan to use Parsons as more of a point forward in the second season of his three-year, $46 million deal, want to have a bigger shooting guard who is a better defender and 3-point threat than Ellis. Potential fits in free agency include Danny Green and Wesley Matthews.

***

No. 2: Karl responds to Cousins rumors; Divac says no deal imminent Whether or not the Sacramento Kings end up trading their All-Star center, DeMarcus Cousins, before the start of 2015-16 remains to be seen. Coach George Karl responded to the rumors yesterday during a kids golf clinic at the U.S. Senior Open at Del Paso Country Club, (the transcript is below) and Jason Jones of the Sacramento Bee has more details on the relationship between Cousins and Karl:

Q: There’s so much flying around your team right now. Will you set the record straight where you and DeMarcus are at this point.

George Karl: I think its just a lot of crazy, crazy fibs and lies. It’s a situation where we won 29 games last year. For us as a basketball organization we want to get better. Cousins is our best player, we know that. We want him committed and dedicated to playing in Sacramento and leading us to the first playoffs in Sacramento in six, seven, eight, nine years.

Q: You are not interested in trading DeMarcus Cousins?

George Karl: My interest is commitment, trust and building a team that’s excited about being in Sacramento and excited and committed to being a good basketball team and representing the city of Sacramento.

Q: That includes, in your mind, Cousins staying here?

George Karl: If he comes committed, I’m 120 percent into making him the best basketball player he could ever be.

Q: Do you have some question about his commitment?

George Karl: Well no. In the 30 games I coached him we were all frustrated with losing. I was here for 30 games and so the frustration, I’m sure, was double that for Cuz and all the players here for the whole season.

Additionally, Ailene Voison of the Sacramento Bee caught up with vice president of basketball and franchise operations Vlade Divac and Karl, who both seem committed to keeping Cousins in town and happy:

Owner Vivek Ranadive and Divac, the vice president of basketball and franchise operations, continue to insist Cousins will not be traded. Distracted from his preparation for Thursday’s NBA draft, an irritated Divac responded to reports from ESPN and Yahoo early Tuesday by forcefully saying, “It is not happening. I don’t care what the agents or the media people are saying. I don’t know why we are wasting time talking about something that is not going to happen.”

For now, Cousins stays put. Ranadive is holding firm to the final three years of his contract. Divac is similarly intent on building around his gifted big man. In a meeting with Cousins’ agents a few weeks ago in Los Angeles, the Kings’ top basketball executive struck right at the heart of the matter: Karl is the coach, and he isn’t going anywhere.

While Cousins has complained he has not heard from his coach, in an ominous sign, Karl said he has sent an estimated 10 texts or phone calls since the season ended, none of which has initiated a response. In a brief conversation Tuesday, Karl sounded as exasperated as Divac.

“I want to get better,” Karl said. “I’ve had more conversations with my staff about ‘How we are going to coach him (Cousins), how we are going to motivate him, connect with him?’ than anything else.”

Asked about speculation he has been pressuring management to trade the All-Star center, Karl replied, “We won 29 games last year. Cuz is our best player. We know that, and we want him committed. My interest right now is commitment, trust and building a team that’s excited about being in Sacramento, excited and committed to being a good basketball team. Rudy (Gay) is just like Cuz. They’re our two best basketball players, and 99, 95 percent of this (trade) stuff is just a bunch of innuendo, gossip and somebody putting two and two together until it becomes six. But two and two comes out four, and they’re going to be on our basketball team.”


VIDEO: How likely are the Kings to trade DeMarcus Cousins?

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No. 3: LeBron staying upbeat, even after Finals loss The Cleveland Cavaliers are about a week removed from their loss in Game 6 of The Finals that clinched the title for the Golden State Warriors. LeBron James was otherworldly in the series, but his play wasn’t enough to get Cleveland a title and while that all still stings for him, he’s keeping a good perspective on the defeat. ESPN.com has more from James, who shared his post-Finals thoughts on Facebook:

LeBron James vowed improvement but said he has been buoyed by the Cleveland Cavaliers’ fans after a disappointing NBA Finals loss to the Golden State Warriors.

“It hurt to lose,” James wrote Tuesday in captioning a Facebook photo of children in his LeBron James Family Foundation at the Cedar Point amusement park. “I’ve been in a funk lately, but this… this is what motivates me to do what I do. How can I ever be down when I know my kids and my fans have my back?

“Being back home and back with my fans is everything that I dreamed of. Thank you for an incredible season. I’m not satisfied… I’m not happy with the way things turned out… I PROMISE to get better. #StriveForGreatness #ILoveTheseKids #GodBlessOurFans.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Our Scott-Howard Cooper reports the Golden State Warriors are trying to trade up in the Draft … The Boston Celtics are reportedly going to keep pushing for a DeMarcus Cousins trade up through the Draft … Speaking of the Celtics, they reportedly dangled two of their first-round picks and Marcus Smart to the 76ers in hopes of moving up to No. 3 (Philly passed on the deal) … Are the Milwaukee Bucks shopping Michael Carter-Williams in hopes of moving up in the Draft? … Fantastic long read by Joe Posnanski on the impact Dell and Stephen Curry have had in Charlotte …The Sacramento Kings may be interested in trading for JaVale McGee

Blogtable: Future for 7-footers?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Future for 7-footers? | Going defense-first? | Cavs or Warriors in 2016?



VIDEODebating the merits of playing small vs. big

> After watching the “small ball” Finals, what does the future look like for a 7-footer in the NBA?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Frankly, the NBA better hope that its 7-footers, however rare, aren’t eradicated from the scene. Last I checked, no one was goosing the TV ratings to watch a 6-foot-5-and-under league. Part of the appeal of pro basketball always has been its big men and, in my view, the NBA’s Competition Committee needs to dial back some of the things that favor the shorties. My suggestion: Widen the court and extend the 3-point line an extra foot or two all around. The game has gotten too 3-heavy, diminishing the mid-range game, which always showcased some of the most creative and athletic shot-making. More mid-range ultimately means greater roles for the bigs.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: There will always be a place for skilled big men in the NBA — emphasis on skilled. Going forward, there should be emphasis on developing an all-around game that includes passing and shooting as a way to spread the floor on offense and ability to come away from the low post to defend.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comCan the 7-footer shoot and move? It’s not the size, it’s the skill set. I would have thought Andrew Bogut plays no matter what because he can be a facilitator on offense as well as defend, not some plodding center who can only impact within arm’s reach of the basket. So if he spends a lot of The Finals riding pine, all bets are off. Be mobile or be increasingly worried.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThe future looks like Karl-Anthony Towns and Jahlil Okafor and the next potentially great center coming from the Draft. I don’t buy the idea that the big man is obsolete. Mediocre big men are obsolete. Crummy big men are obsolete. But the next Hakeem Olajuwon won’t be sitting on the bench in The Finals, trust me.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThere’s space for seven-footers, and there will be a few — Marc Gasol, DeAndre Jordan, Brook and Robin Lopez — that will get big contracts this summer. You need to be mobile and bring some skills to the table, preferably on both ends of the floor. But there’s room in today’s pick-and-roll, spread-the-floor offenses for a big guy  (Tyson Chandler is a good example) who just has to be able to set a good screen, roll hard to the basket, catch the ball and finish. Layups are still more valuable than 3-pointers, and a good roll man opens things up for good shooters.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: It depends on what kind of 7-footer you are. The days of big man battleship basketball in the NBA have ended. They went away when Shaquille O’Neal cleared out the big man division. Any dominant big man since then either has been a hybrid/stretch four or a some variation. The skilled 7-footer will always have a place in basketball. So much will depend on the training young bigs get on the way up. If they are schooled in all facets of the game, we’ll see some new hybrids enter into the mix. Work on your free throws and face-up game, young bigs, and you will be fine. I did enjoy the small-ball portion of these Finals, though, and wonder how many more teams will be forced to embrace that approach?

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: It depends where he is playing. If the Cavaliers had entered The Finals at full health then we might now be discussing the renewal of the 7-footer – we may even be talking about it this time next year, based on Cleveland’s potential to go big with LeBron James, Kevin Love, Anderson Varejao, Tristan Thompson and Timofey Mozgov. Small-ball succeeded, but that doesn’t mean the death of traditional lineups. Depending on the size and speed of your team, and the strengths and weaknesses of your stars, there are all kinds of ways of winning the championship – and Mike D’Antoni’s system is now officially among the options.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I’d say it looks brighter than ever. It took David Blatt a game, but once he figured out how to deploy Timofey Mozgov against that vortex of 6-foot-7 players, Mozgov had a pretty big impact on Game 6. Small lineups are the easiest to deploy, mostly because small players are the easiest thing to find. But uncover a seven-footer who can get up and down the court and he can destroy versus a small lineup. One of the oldest maxims in the NBA is height doesn’t grow on trees. And it still doesn’t.

Blogtable: Why not go defense-first?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Future for 7-footers? | Going defense-first? | Cavs or Warriors in 2016?



VIDEOHow the Warriors’ defense made life tough on the Cavs in Game 6

> The Warriors are the 19th NBA champion in the last 20 years to have a top 10 defensive rating during the regular season (they were ranked No. 1). So why don’t more teams focus on defense, and what does a defense-first roster look like?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: There are plenty of coaches who believe that defense wins. But NBA rules are set up to facilitate scoring, grinding defense isn’t very entertaining and there might be a player revolt if a team practiced and played defense as intently as this question suggests. Because even when it’s a source of pride, defense isn’t fun. As for what a team built that way might look like, do we really want to see Rajon Rondo, Tony Allen, Kawhi Leonard, Serge Ibaka and DeAndre Jordan laboring for points when their team has the ball?

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Good teams do concentrate on defense, as evidenced by 19 of the last 20 champions ranking in the top 10. The Spurs went away from defensive emphasis for a year or two, slipped back into the pack and then made a renewed commitment that produced back-to-back Finals appearances and the 2014 championship.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comBecause defense isn’t glitzy. It doesn’t sell a lot of tickets. I also think a lot of teams do try to focus on defense, but actually coming up with a good defensive unit is difficult. It didn’t just fall together for the Warriors. They took serious heat for trading Monta Ellis for Andrew Bogut. They lucked into getting Draymond Green in the Draft. There was no way to anticipate Stephen Curry’s improvement on that side of the ball. There is no “look” to a defense-first roster. The best defender can be on the wing or inside. But there has to be at least a couple players who are not only good in that area, but who also have a strong presence in the locker room to have others follow their lead for a level of commitment that does not come with the same glory as scoring 20 points a game. And there obviously has to be a coach using the strengths the proper way.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I suspect teams do concentrate on D. But not everyone can play it at a high level. The Warriors had athletic players who could guard multiple positions and shut down the perimeter. The Memphis Grizzlies also play terrific D. Any team with a rim protector and quick wingmen will more often than not win games with defense.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Two-way players don’t grow on trees, and teams have to build around the personnel that they have. The Cavs (when healthy) obviously had a higher ceiling offensively, while the Milwaukee Bucks had no choice but to earn wins on defense. Versatility — having guys who can defend multiple positions — is a key. The Warriors (and Bucks) were so good defensively, because they had a lot of like-sized, lengthy defenders, who could switch on screens and prevent dribble penetration. Good offenses get good shots by drawing two defenders to the ball, so having the ability to switch (and keep just one guy on the ball) helps you stay in front of the ball and stay at home on shooters.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Defense doesn’t sell tickets. And at the end of the day, stoking interest still seems to revolve around the idea of playing faster, shooting more 3-pointers and an up-tempo attack. The Warriors nailed the model by fashioning a team that proved to be elite on both ends. With versatile defenders at nearly ever position on a team capable of dominating teams on either or both ends of the floor, they built a champion. That’s as good a place as any to start talking about the ideal, defense-first roster.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Teams haven’t been able to focus on defense at the expense of offense in the years since the old man-to-man rules were relaxed: If you don’t put five scorers on the floor then you become too easy to defend. The goal is to find two-way players like Draymond Green; or else to convince scorers to commit to the defensive end, which is what the 2008 Celtics were able to do with Ray Allen and Paul Pierce (and what Cleveland will try to do next season with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love). The Warriors are the ultimate example of a team that commits first to defense – and then knows how to convert those stops and steals into offense.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogI read so many stories yesterday about how Warriors had embraced the Mike D’Antoni style of play and were going to change the way NBA teams were built going forward. To which I thought, I don’t remember those D’Antoni teams being all that good on defense. Because to me, as great as the Warriors were offensively — and make no mistake, they were a juggernaut on that end — it was their commitment and ability defensively that made them NBA champions. But sure, it’s probably more exciting to focus on the 3-pointers and the fast pace. But as we all know, defense wins championships.