Posts Tagged ‘Dallas Mavericks’

Morning shootaround — Nov. 19


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Anthony dealing with knee ‘soreness’ | James wants less minutes for ‘Big Three’ | KG hoping Kidd gets warm Brooklyn reception | Cuban takes shot at Lakers

No. 1: Anthony dealing with knee ‘soreness’Carmelo Anthony has played fantastic of late, averaging 30.4 ppg over his last five games. Unfortunately, his New York Knicks are 1-4 in that span, a stretch that includes last night’s failed comeback attempt against the Milwaukee Bucks. After dropping 26 points on the Bucks, though, Anthony revealed to the media that his left knee has been giving him some trouble since opening night. Peter Botte of the New York Daily News has more:

Carmelo Anthony laid on a training table in the visiting locker room for several minutes, his left knee being iced down following the Knicks’ failed comeback bid in a 117-113 loss Tuesday to the Bucks.

Anthony left the court briefly in the second quarter to have his left knee retaped before returning to play 20 of 24 minutes in the second half – and finish with a team-high 26 points in 37:45 overall.

But the $124 million All-Star revealed he’s been playing with some “soreness” in his left knee “since the Cleveland game” on Oct. 30, and acknowledged that he recently “had some (medical) tests” on that leg, although he wouldn’t reveal any specifics.

“I don’t think it’s serious. I’m out there playing. I don’t think it’s that serious,” Anthony said after the game. “My knee was bothering me a little bit. The tape job I had on it, it kind of got wet a little bit. I started feeling it a little bit after that. I cut the tape off on the bench and I started to feel a little bit more pain. I had to come back and get it retaped. It felt better once I got it retaped. I banged my knee when I had to dive on the ball with Giannis (Antetokounmpo), I banged my knee on the floor. It was sore from that point on.

“I’ve just been trying to go through it and play through it and not kind of think about it. Some days are better than others. Today once the tape came off of it, I felt it. When I banged it on the floor, it made it worse.”


VIDEO: The Bucks hold off the Knicks in Milwaukee

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Morning Shootaround — Nov. 17


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 16

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Turning toxic in Los Angeles? | Beal is back | Thunder, Rockets combine for ugly battle | Revisiting the ‘Melo trade

No. 1: Turning toxic in Los Angeles? — The Los Angeles Lakers entered this season with high hopes. Sure, the roster wasn’t as strong as it has been in years past, but they had a healthy Kobe Bryant, and if there’s anything we’ve learned through the years, it’s to not bet against Kobe. But the power of positive thinking apparently doesn’t extend to defensive rotations or offensive consistency, as the Lakers have gotten off to a franchise-worst 1-9 start. And last night’s 136-115 loss to the Warriors may portend even worse things ahead, as some players seem to be unhappy with Kobe’s volume shooting while coach Byron Scott wasn’t thrilled with the team’s defense, writes ESPNLosAngeles.com’s Baxter Holmes:

Scott lambasted his team’s effort, saying that he showed video to his players at halftime of them jogging when they should’ve been running. They didn’t change.

“I can fix that, basically, and [I] will starting Tuesday,” Scott said.

That’s when the Lakers will play the Hawks in Atlanta.

“It’s just going to be a very short leash,” Scott said. “If I see, in my eyes, that you’re not giving that effort, then I’ll just pull guys out.”

He added, “I think we have some guys right now, because of some of the injuries that we have, that feel that they’re almost entitled because they’ve got to play. Well, we’re losing anyway, so I ain’t got to play you.”

Then there was Bryant, who scored 44 points on 15-of-34 shooting from the field in 31 minutes. It was his most points since he tore his Achilles in 2013, and it came on a night when he wasn’t sure if he’d play with a viral infection anyway.

Kobe's shot chart vs. Warriors

Kobe Bryant’s shot chart vs. Golden State

But Bryant shot the ball like it was a hot potato, launching it almost the second he caught it, no matter where he was, no matter how contested the shot was.

He shot 13 field goals in the first quarter; the rest of the Lakers shot 15.

He had 24 shots at halftime; the rest of the Lakers shot 32.

At intermission, he was on pace to set a new career-high for field-goal attempts in a game, besting the 47 he shot in November 2002 against Boston.

But for as much as he shot, and for as much as he scored, the Lakers kept falling further and further behind, eventually by as much as 38.

“We look up there, and we see that we’re winning by 30, 40 points, that 44 is really irrelevant,” Warriors backup center Marreese Speights said.

All the while, the Lakers looked far less like a team and more like one player.

In their locker room after, frustration boiled over more than at any point this season — and it was quite clear which direction most of it was aimed.

Said Carlos Boozer: “A lot of times we run a set, but Kobe is extremely aggressive. And then we try to hit the glass, get it off the glass. We’ve got to find a balance. It can’t be lopsided. We’ve got to find a balance.”

Said Jeremy Lin: “The game of basketball is … we’ve got to do it together. It can’t be … if I go into a game concerned about myself, then in some ways that’s detrimental to the team.”

Lin later added, “There’s so many things wrong right now. At the top of the list, I would say communication, trust and effort.”

Bryant defended his volume shooting, using metaphors about crime.

“Obviously I’d rather get guys involved early, but if a purse gets stolen in front of you, how many blocks are you going to let the guy run?” he asked.

“You going to chase him down and keep him in sight yourself or just wait for the authorities to get there, or decide to let him run and wait for the authorities to get there? It’s a tough thing.”


VIDEO: Kobe Bryant talks after the Lakers’ loss to the Warriors (more…)

One Stat, One Play: Drives, Rolls & Space


VIDEO: One Stat, One Play: Drives, rolls and space

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Dallas Mavericks ranked third in offensive efficiency last season, scoring 109.0 points per 100 possessions, with a near-impossible-to-guard duo of Monta Ellis and Dirk Nowitzki.

Ellis led the league in drives, while Nowitzki was arguably the best mid-range shooter in the league. Only three guys shot better than 50 percent or better on at least 100 mid-range attempts last season, and Nowitzki had a lot more attempts than the other two (Courtney Lee and Greivis Vasquez).

This season, Mavs coach Rick Carlisle has more weapons at his disposal. Tyson Chandler, returning to Dallas after three years, is one of the best roll men in the league. He can set a good screen, roll hard to the basket, get up high, catch and finish. Chandler Parsons and Jameer Nelson, meanwhile, are two more guys who handle the ball and shoot from the perimeter. The Mavs take this season’s No. 1 offense (by a wide margin) into Portland for the second game of TNT’s Thursday double-header (10:30 p.m. ET).

The video above is our second installment of “One Stat, One Play,” a look at the position the Mavs put opposing defenses in when Ellis has the ball in his hands and Chandler is rolling to the basket with three shooting threats on the perimeter.

Analytics Art: Big roster changes

By Andrew Bergmann @dubly, for NBA.com

In the offseason, several squads went through major roster overhauls, with the most notable being LeBron James‘ move from Miami to Cleveland. A few teams, including Dallas and the L.A. Lakers, had major makeovers. Others, like San Antonio and Golden State, will look strikingly similar to last season.

nba-team-changes

Andrew Bergmann’s data driven design work can be found on CNN, NBA, Sports Illustrated, Deadspin, NPR, Washington Post, and USA Today. See more on www.dubly.com and twitter.com/dubly

 

Morning Shootaround — Oct. 27


VIDEO: The top 10 dunks from the preseason

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: No progress in talks between Leonard, Spurs | Melo would have been fine playing witth Kobe | Iguodala fine with backing up Barnes | Report: Barea heading back to the Mavs?

No. 1: Report: No progress in talks between Leonard, Spurs — We all know Kawhi Leonard isn’t going anywhere. The San Antonio Spurs’ forward and Finals MVP is a franchise pillar. But that hasn’t sped up the contract extension talks between Leonard and the organization. Days away from the deadline the two sides have ground to make up. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports has more:

As Kawhi Leonard holds firm on his desire for a maximum contract, extension talks with the San Antonio Spurs have failed to gather traction despite a looming Friday deadline, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Leonard, the 2014 NBA Finals Most Valuable Player, would become a restricted free agent in July without an extension agreement by midnight Oct. 31 – the deadline for eligible extensions for the NBA’s draft class of 2011.

Spurs president and general manager R.C. Buford and agent Brian Elfus have had several discussions in recent weeks, but no progress has been made, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Leonard, 23, is considered one of the NBA’s rising young stars, and multiple league executives told Yahoo Sports he’ll command a max offer sheet on the market next summer. The Spurs would assuredly match a sheet and retain Leonard, but there remains the risk of Leonard signing a similar offer sheet to Dallas Mavericks forward Chandler Parsons.

Parsons signed a three-year, $46 million offer sheet that included a player option on the third year. This way, Leonard could become an unrestricted free agent and potentially leave the Spurs in 2017.

San Antonio could sign Leonard to a five-year, $90 million-plus extension now, if the Spurs were willing to make him their designated player. San Antonio could also negotiate a four-year deal at the maximum contract level – or below – before the Friday deadline. As a restricted free agent next summer, the Spurs could also sign Leonard to a five-year extension at or below the maximum contract level.

Leonard has missed the preseason with an eye infection and is unlikely to be in the lineup on Tuesday for the Spurs opening night game against Dallas.

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Nash’s greatness found in the numbers


VIDEO: Steve Nash Will Miss The 2014-15 NBA Season

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – Mike D’Antoni, Steve Nash and the Phoenix Suns changed NBA offense forever. They showed us what can be accomplished with a simple pick-and-roll, floor spacing and a willingness to share the ball.

Elements of D’Antoni’s “Seven seconds or less” offense are seen throughout the league today. But Nash was running the NBA’s best offense long before D’Antoni was. In his last three years as the starting point guard in Dallas, the Mavericks ranked No. 1 in offensive efficiency.

Nash took that streak to Phoenix and continued it for another six years. He ran the No. 1 offense with Dirk Nowitzki and Michael Finley, even with Antoine Walker shooting 82-for-305 (27 percent) from 3-point range in 2003-04. In fact, when you compare teams’ offensive efficiency with the league average, that Mavs team had the No. 1 offense of the last 37 years (since the league started counting turnovers in 1977).

In Phoenix, Nash ran the No 1. offense with Amar’e Stoudemire and Joe Johnson, and kept it at No. 1 when Johnson left for Atlanta and Stoudemire missed all but three games in 2005-06. Even when Shaquille O’Neal arrived and supposedly bogged down the Suns’ attack, they had the most efficient offense in the league.

The Suns played at a fast pace, but we’re not looking at points per game, here. We’re looking at points per possession. And not only did Nash run the No. 1 offense of the last 37 years, he’s run each of the top five offenses of the last 37 years.

20141024_nash

Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlain each led the league in scoring for seven straight seasons. Steve Nash ran the league’s best offense for nine straight, a run that started when Shaq and Kobe Bryant were at their best and ended when LeBron James was winning multiple MVPs.

Nash hasn’t said whether his career is over now that he’s been ruled out for the entire 2014-15 season, but it’s reasonable to guess that it is. It’s also reasonable to believe that we’ll never see another streak like the one he had between 2001 and 2010.

You can debate the merit Nash’s MVP awards or his place in the NBA’s all-time point guard rankings. But there’s no debating that he was one of the best offensive players of his generation. The numbers speak for themselves.

Forgotten Villanueva hopes to stick

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com

DALLAS – Charlie Villanueva could have packed his sneakers, walked away from the game and lived a happy life with his wife and two young kids wherever they so pleased, and no one might ever have noticed he’d left.

Memphis Grizzlies v Dallas Mavericks

Charlie Villanueva is looking to turn a non-guaranteed training camp invite into a full-time spot on the Mavericks.
Danny Bollinger/NBAE/Getty Images

It’s been that long since the 6-foot-11, sweet-shooting, headband-wearing Villanueva — once a No. 7 overall pick and once an ascending player with the Bucks who became the Pistons’ prized, $37-million free-agent acquisition — did much of anything in the league.

What should have been prime years of his career instead wasted away on Detroit’s bench, Villanueva rendered impotent by a toxic mix of various and seemingly unending injuries, a frustrating coaching carousel and a series of organizational missteps. He became the NBA’s forgotten man.

“I think a lot of people forgot about what Charlie Villanueva can do,” he told NBA.com on Monday night, seated in the corner of the Dallas Mavericks’ locker room, awaiting preseason game No. 6 of eight of his hopeful resurrection. “Sometimes you’ve got to take two steps backward to take three steps forward. It’s just what happened in my career. But now I’m trying to change things around. I’m trying to reinvent myself.”

For the last five weeks, Villanueva, 30, has lived out of a couple of suitcases at the Omni Hotel in downtown Dallas, a 1.2-mile walk to the American Airlines Center and Mavs headquarters, leaving behind his family in Michigan. He agreed on Sept. 23 to come to training camp on a non-guaranteed contract.

“I’m not used to this, but everything happens for a reason, so I’m going with the punches,” Villanueva said. “I’ve spent a lot of time by myself. I’m away from my family now, away from the kids, a lot of alone time and a lot of eating meals alone.”

The Clippers were a potential option, but no guaranteed money was being offered there either. He chose Dallas, saying it just felt right, even though it already has the maximum 15 players on guaranteed contracts. If Villanueva is going to make the team, he’s going to have to convince owner Mark Cuban (who is open to being convinced) to trade (Gal Mekel?) or buy out (Bernard James?) a player on a guaranteed deal.

“I had a great conversation with coach [Rick Carlisle] and I just felt there was a serious opportunity here if I do my part,” Villanueva said. “I love the team, I love the city and I felt like every guy complemented each other real well, and this team is real deep as well. I felt why not go for the challenge and see what happens?”

The opportunity is real. The Mavs have long searched for a true stretch-4 to back up Dirk Nowitzki to maintain the offensive flow when he sits. Small forward Shawn Marion, now in Cleveland with LeBron James, was strong enough to move up a weight class when Nowitzki rested. Marion’s replacement, the 6-foot-10 sharpshooter Chandler Parsons, will be asked to play some power forward. The Mavs also acquired Al-Farouq Aminu, who Dallas coaches are taking great care to refine his defensive skills and 3-point shot. Brandan Wright plays more center than power forward because his best offensive skill is rolling to the basket.

The 240-pound, floor-spacing Villanueva seems the fit Dallas has been seeking. The Mavs signed Rashard Lewis in July, but voided the contract after discovering an injury, something that finally isn’t the first thing mentioned when Villanueva’s name comes up.

“Oh, I feel good. I haven’t felt this good in a while, man,” Villanueva said. “Feeling good, in great shape, healthy, just excited about basketball again.”

Within the Mavs’ organization there seems a genuine interest in getting Villanueva on the roster.

“He’s an extremely intelligent basketball player and he knows what he can and can’t do,” Carlisle said. “Those are the kind of guys that you like to have … He’s done a good job. He’s making a strong case.”

His start to the preseason — 32 points, 8-for-16 shooting from beyond the arc and nine rebounds in 35 minutes spread over three games — was more promising than his last three games — 13 points, 2-for-10 on 3s and five rebounds in 25 minutes over three games. He played just six minutes in Monday’s game against Memphis, the type of team with a big front line that would figure to make Villanueva valuable to Dallas. However, one weaknesses so far has been his low-post defense.

“I definitely feel like [I’ve been] given a fair shot,” Villanueva said. “I felt good about my chances, but at the end of the day, until I hear that word, I can’t be comfortable, I can’t get this monkey off my back.”

He’s far removed from 16.7 ppg and 6.7 rpg in 2008-09, the season that convinced Detroit to make him a swift and lucrative offer the ensuing summer. It’s been a long five years since. He essentially disappeared.

His five-year deal with Detroit finally up, having played only limited minutes in just 102 games over the last three seasons, Villanueva could have convinced himself to walk away, to enjoy his family and pursue new interests.

But he couldn’t walk away. It’s been a training camp like none other for Villanueva. Now two preseason games remain. The regular season begins next Tuesday.

“I love playing basketball,” Villanueva said. “I’m feeling good, feeling healthy, so trying to maximize my abilities until they take the basketball away from me.”

Morning shootaround — Oct. 16


VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played Oct. 15

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Players support shorter season; MJ mystified by such talk | Report: C-Webb joins group looking to buy Hawks | Smith, Van Gundy talk 3-pointers

No. 1: Nowitzki, James support shortening season, not games; Jordan puzzled by such talk — This Sunday, the NBA will experiment with a shorter-than-usual game as the Brooklyn Nets and Boston Celtics will take part in a 44-minute preseason contest. News of that upcoming game has led to debate all over the internet (and on this very site) about whether a shorter game would be beneficial to the NBA as a whole or not. Two prominent stars in the game — LeBron James and Dirk Nowitzki — think shortening the length of the season, not games, would be the most beneficial change that could happen. ESPN.com’s Dave McMenamin and Tim McMahon have more:

“I think you don’t need 82 games to determine the best eight in each conference,” Nowitzki said Wednesday. “That could be done a lot quicker, but I always understand that it’s about money, and every missed game means missed money for both parties, for the league, for the owners, for the players. I understand all that, and that’s why I don’t think it’s going to change anytime soon.”

James, speaking before the Cavs hosted a preseason game against the Indiana Pacers, was adamant the length of games isn’t what should be at stake. And he said most of his fellow players are in agreement.

“No. It’s not the minutes, it’s the games,” James said. “The minutes doesn’t mean anything. We can play 50-minute games if we had to. It’s just the games. We all as players think it’s too many games. In our season, 82 games is a lot. But it’s not the minutes. Taking away minutes from the game is not going to shorten the game at all.

“Once you go out and play on the floor, it don’t matter if you play 22 minutes — like I may be playing tonight — or you’re playing 40 minutes,” James added. “Once you play, it takes a toll on your body. So it’s not lessening the minutes, I think it’s the games.”

Nowitzki and James were piggybacking on the point made by Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra when asked about the league’s experiment with a 44-minute game, which will be played by the Brooklyn Nets and Boston Celtics on Sunday.

…”Honestly, I never was a big fan of back-to-backs even when I was 20 years old,” said Nowitzki, a 36-year-old entering his 17th NBA season. “I think that you should never have to play at the highest level there is two consecutive nights and flying in between. You obviously make it work. We have the best athletes in the world, we feel, but I think it hurts the product some. Last year, some teams get here for the fourth game in five nights and we’ve been sitting here on rest and just blow them out.

“I don’t think it’s good for the product, but I also understand that 82 games is where it’s at. It’s a business, and everybody’s got to live with it.”

James said more analysis on the potential impact to the business side seemed to be in order.

“It’s something that we definitely will have to sit down and try figure out if that’s the case, that may happen,” James said. “Obviously I don’t know the numbers right off the top of my head, but that would create less revenue. We all know that without even seeing the books that less games, less concession stands and less selling of tickets and all of that.

“But at the end of the day, we want to protect the prize and the prize is the players. We have to continue to promote the game, and if guys are being injured because there are so many games, we can’t promote it at a high level.”

Nowitzki would like the league to look at the possibility of allowing fewer timeouts, especially at the end of games.

“It’s such a fun, fast game,” Nowitzki said. “Then there’s one action and they score, OK, there’s a timeout and you sit for two minutes. There’s another action, they score, tie it up [and another timeout is called].

“There’s no other sport where it’s interrupted so much at the end. That’s something that I would look at. Both teams are like, ‘They have another timeout? Are you kidding me?’ That’s a little much, but other than that, I think the game’s great.”

After the NBA’s best and brightest of today had that to say about the schedule, the greatest player of the NBA’s last era, Michael Jordan, said he was shocked that superstars would want to play less games. ESPN.com’s Chris Broussard has more:

“I love both of those guys, but as an owner who played the game, I loved playing,” Jordan, who owns the Charlotte Hornets, told ESPN.com during a telephone interview. “If I wasn’t playing 82 games, I still would’ve been playing somewhere else because that’s the love for the game I had. As a player, I never thought 82 games was an issue.

“But if that’s what they want to do, we as owners and players can evaluate it and talk about it. But we’d make less money as partners. Are they ready to give up money to play fewer games? That’s the question, because you can’t make the same amount of money playing fewer games.”

Jordan also didn’t see the point in shortening games by four minutes.

He said the league informed its clubs of its intention to play a 44-minute game but that it was not presented as something the league is seriously considering instituting in the regular season.

“I would never shorten the game by four minutes,” Jordan said, “unless guys were having physical issues.”

Jordan said basketball players generally don’t incur the same long-term physical ailments as football players so he can’t understand the talk of a shorter season or shorter games.

“It’s not like football,” he said. “We don’t really have to worry about concussions and some of the physical damage that football players deal with after they retire. I can understand football players wanting to play fewer games from a physical standpoint. But basketball’s not the same. I’m not diminishing the fact that we go through a grueling season. But I wouldn’t want to shorten the game or play 15-20 fewer games.”


VIDEO: Dirk Nowitzki explains why the NBA should think about a shorter season

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‘Chubbygate’ ends with chuckle in Dallas


VIDEO: Parsons says he’s pleased that coach Rick Carlisle apologized for his comments

DALLAS – When Mark Cuban was asked to weigh in on what has become a sensitive issue around here, the Dallas Mavericks owner peered down from his step machine, sweat beading on his forehead and said: “I have to talk about Chubbygate?”

The hubbub started in the early stages of training camp when Mavs coach Rick Carlisle called out prized new acquisition Chandler Parsons for being out of shape. Carlisle suggested that Chandler was a bit too paunchy around the mid-section.

It’s quite the accusation against a heartthrob and bona fide blue-jeans model.

The 6-foot-9 small forward has said he wanted to bulk up some above the waist to help him better guard power forwards when needed. Still, Carlisle shoved on with his ill-fated motivational tactic following Friday night’s preseason game.

“An increase of 18 to 20 pounds is just too much,” Carlisle said. “We talked about it today. We talk about it a lot. He’ll get there, but he looked tired out there and a little heavy-legged, and the extra seven or eight pounds aren’t helping.

“I don’t mean to call him out in public or ridicule him, but it’s just a fact. He’s an important guy for us. We just need him to get to his right conditioning and weight level so he can play his best because we’re going to need him to play a lot of minutes over the course of 82 games.”

Chandler, who signed a $46 million offer sheet from the Mavs in July and officially joined the franchise when the Houston Rockets decided not to match, wasn’t appreciative of such motivation. He could have just rolled his eyes understanding that in years past Carlisle had called out Lamar Odom a few seasons ago and Samuel Dalembert last season.

Of course, neither of those players had instantaneously become the franchise’s second-highest-paid player in a very public courting, and is arguably the Mavs’ most important player for title contention.

Over the weekend, Chandler wanted the world to see just how “overweight” he is, so he snapped a shot of his bare washboard torso while standing on a balcony of a Dallas high-rise and posted it on Instagram. It made the social media rounds, quickly. A lot of people took notice, including, Carlisle said, his wife and daughter.

“I received my punishment,” Carlisle said. “My wife and daughter became full-time Chandler Parsons Twitter and Instagram followers.”

At that point, Carlisle must have felt he was seeing a different body image than everybody else, so he felt compelled to apologize? Carlisle issued a statement Sunday prior to the Mavs’ preseason game against Indiana:

“It was unfair and inappropriate to single out Chandler Parsons after the game Friday night. I have apologized to him and the entire team for this error in judgment. Not only is Chandler Parsons one of our best players, he is also one of our hardest working players and the kind of high-character person we strive to bring to our city and franchise.

I also made it clear to our players and staff this morning that this type of bad example is not acceptable and beneath the dignity of a championship organization like the Dallas Mavericks.”

Well then.

The apology was well-received by Parsons.

“It just shows what kind of guy he is,” Parsons said after Sunday’s game. “We’re in this together. Everybody makes mistakes and he came to me as a man. We have a great relationship. It’s in the past, and we’re going to move forward. It’s over with.”

Thank goodness.

But was Carlisle really wrong for publicly airing his concerns? Or was it bad judgement to take such a tact? Was Parsons, 25, just overly sensitive? And either way, was an apology of such conviction truly warranted from one of the league’s most successful coaches?

Cuban, known at times to fuel his own headlines by speaking out to the media, called “Chubbygate” a non-event and said he doesn’t know if it was necessary for Carlisle to apologize. But, he’s glad Carlisle did.

“Rick’s smart,” Cuban said. “When he feels like somebody’s sensitive about something or he touched a nerve, he deals with it. He doesn’t run away from it. He doesn’t pretend it didn’t happen. It was no big deal. It’s a non-event.”

We now return your regularly scheduled programming.

Blogtable: Pierce, Gasol, Parsons?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Sophomore strength | Best new fit | A memorable summer


Long-time Lakers center Pau Gasol bolted for Chicago over the summer. (Randy Belice/NBAE)

Long-time Lakers center Pau Gasol bolted for Chicago over the summer. (Randy Belice/NBAE)

> Which of these players will fit in best with his new team: Paul Pierce, Pau Gasol or Chandler Parsons? Why?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I like them all in their new surroundings. Pierce seems energized by Washington’s youth and up-and-coming attitude, and he’s willing to be more old head than focal point. Parsons is versatile enough to fill different needs for Dallas on different nights. Gasol opens up new vistas for Chicago’s offense, especially in tandem with Derrick Rose, and is eager to put the past two sour Lakers years behind him. Forced to choose? I’ll go with Parsons because of his age, because of the opportunities he’ll get with the Mavericks and because he’s the least likely of the three to battle injuries.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: From the day he chose Chicago, I’ve thought Pau Gasol is the perfect complement to Joakim Noah. He’s a solid frontline scorer and rebounder, excellent passer and should give a Bulls offense that struggles to score points another option and big boost.

Paul Pierce (Chris Covatta/Getty Images)

Paul Pierce (Chris Covatta/Getty Images)

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Well, look, Paul Pierce is such a veteran that he’s going to walk into that locker room with some up-and-coming young dudes and just own it. Pau Gasol is a gentleman and so easy to get along with that he’ll fit in quickly in Chicago. But, Chandler Parsons is going to be a tremendous fit with the Dallas Mavericks. Playing off Dirk Nowitzki and Monta Ellis, and with Rick Carlisle figuring out the best ways to put him in a position to be successful, I really think Parsons is going to show a lot of versatility in Dallas and is headed for a big year.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Gasol, because he can fit in most any situation. While I like the other two additions, especially Parsons in Dallas, Gasol is the perfect complementary player for a lot of teams. The Bulls can be one of those teams as long as Tom Thibodeau doesn’t go Tom Thibodeau on him and play Gasol into the ground. Gasol will pass at a level that will create opportunities for Derrick Rose and the wing shooters.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Parsons fits best as a secondary playmaker in a Mavs’ offense that already features the impossible-to-guard Ellis/Nowitzki pick-and-roll. If the ball is swung to Parsons on the weak side, he’ll get open threes or be able to attack close-outs with the dribble, more effectively than Shawn Marion in both cases. He’ll need to be a better defender, but the Mavs have Tyson Chandler to help on that end. Gasol will be have more of Tom Thibodeau’s trust than Carlos Boozer did, but there’s some overlap with his skill set and that of Joakim Noah. I’d put Pierce last because I think he’s a more effective four than three these days and, while he gives the Wizards an offensive boost, he can’t replace Trevor Ariza‘s defense.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: After watching Pierce set the tone for the Wizards’ season by getting in the face of Joakim Noah and the Chicago Bulls in the exhibition opener, I’m even more convinced that he’ll slide into the perfect role in Washington. The Wizards are not going to ask Pierce to be the player he was five or six years ago, when he was still an All-Star caliber player. This team needs an edge, an agitator and a veteran player who can push the youngsters to go to that next level. Pierce is that guy.

Chandler Parsons (Glenn James/NBAE)

Chandler Parsons (Glenn James/NBAE)

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I saw Pierce and Gasol go against each other last night in Chicago, and they both looked good. Pierce in particular gave Washington an aggressive edge, getting mixed up with Joakim Noah minutes into the preseason opener. But I’ve said all summer long that Pau Gasol will have a significant impact for Chicago, and I stand by that thought. Pau will unlock their offense — the other night I saw him attempt a few passes I’m not sure a Bulls center has even thought of in a decade. Most impressive to me was Pau’s demeanor. He made a reasoned and considered decision and truly believes he can affect change we can believe in for these Bulls.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: Paul Pierce seems the right piece for the Wizards puzzle. A good veteran player than can be the glue that connects the yound and talented back-court (John Wall, Bradley Beal, Otto Porter, Jr.) and the experienced front-line (Nene, Marcin Gortat, DeJuan Blair, Drew Gooden). Playing at the 3-spot and having that kind of experienced, means that he can fill all the dots and take his new team to the next level.

Guillermo García, NBA Mexico: It is a difficult question, but it seems to me that Pau Gasol’s the right answer, because the Bulls are a team where a full, well-rounded game is essential. Which Pau certainly does. Plus, he’ll have the help of a great post player in Joakim Noah.

Aldo Avinante, NBA Philippines: Chandler Parsons will benefit the most in his new role. He is firmly entrenched in the starting small forward position that was vacated by Shawn Marion and Vince Carter, with Dirk Nowitzki spacing the floor and Monta Ellis driving inside the lane attracting the defense, look for Parsons to take advantage and perform well from the very start.

Juan Carlos Campos Rodriguez, NBA.com Mexico: Pau Gasol will be the player who excels most on a new team, as he’ll have a system where he won’t be the one who has to do the dirty work under the table, something which was questioned during his tenure with the Lakers. He’ll also be able to play power forward, which brought him to the NBA, and be that dominant player with the mid-range shot that opens up spaces so that Rose and company could penetrate the paint more easily.