Posts Tagged ‘Celtics’

Celtics stick to their own formula for turnaround

VIDEO: Isaiah Thomas has been critical to the Celtics’ turnaround

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The playoff berth, the turnaround, the return to relevance, if you will, sans a superstar after the end of the Big 3 era.

It wasn’t supposed to happen overnight for the Boston Celtics.

Danny Ainge‘s current rebuilding project is the model for doing it without the saving grace of a marquee superstar. And that’s fine by Brad Stevens, the coach Ainge plucked from the college ranks to guide these surprising Celtics through this process.

Ainge sold Stevens on a long-term vision, signing him to a six-year deal in 2013 that made him the youngest coach (36) in the NBA at the time, that included a transformation of the culture for the winningest franchise in league history. The days of leaning on future Hall of Famers like Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Ray Allen to lead the way was over.

And in the early stages of the third year of this new era, the Celtics appear ready for prime time. They face off against the Atlanta Hawks tonight (8 ET, TNT), the first of seven national TV games they’ll play this season after just one last year.

Their 20-9 finish last season led to that playoff berth, where they went after LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers in a first-round sweep and served notice that planning for the future didn’t necessarily mean drowning in the misery of the typical rebuilding plan.

Winners of six of their last nine games, the Celtics have shaken off a 1-3 start and gotten back to the ways that led them to the playoffs last season.

Built on a bedrock of defense, depth, player development and shared sacrifice, the Celtics are on to something. With a starting lineup that includes three second-round picks and roster dotted with as many journeymen as high draft picks, Stevens has molded this group into one of the scrappiest crews in the league. And to a man, they point to their young coach and his measured ways as the key to their success.

“His approach is everything, he’s always prepared no matter what the situation, be it in games or practice and that says a lot about a coach in this league” said Isaiah Thomas, the veteran guard who leads the Celtics in scoring (21.6) and assists (6.5). “You never know if he’s happy or mad because he’s so even-keeled. He won’t show it. And that’s how this team is. He’s always talking about looking to the next play. He’s instilled that in us and it’s really defined us as a group. We’re a next play team, no matter what the situation.”

In an environment where basically half of the league is rebuilding perpetually, Stevens has made sure to avoid discussing anything of the sort with his team. Why bother with the obvious, when just talking about it won’t speed up the process?

“We’ve never once talked about it as rebuilding,” Stevens said. “We’ve talked about it as building, growing and improving. We’ve got a lot of young guys. We’re still super young. And we have to take every opportunity as a learning experience. We have to say, there aren’t any excuses in being young and not having that extra experience. That means we have to watch more film, we’ve got to put more time in the gym, we’ve got to shoot more on our own and we’ve to be better to catch up.”

David Lee, 32, is the only player on the roster over the age of 28. He’s also the only former All-Star and he arrived via trade after winning a title with the Golden State Warriors last season. But he doesn’t hold a position above or beyond any of his teammates based on that body of work.

That’s not the way this group works.

“Young and hungry, that’s us,” said fourth-year center Jared Sullinger, the Celtics’ leading rebounder (8.8). “We’ve got a lot of guys who are still trying to establish themselves throughout the league. And we play as a team. On any given night it could be someone’s time to shine and we’re so unselfish. We feed off of that.”

Buying into the system was easy, Sullinger said, because of the collective understanding that none of this would be possible without the entire group diving in. Roles change on the fly, a starter one week could be a key reserve the next. Stevens has fostered an ego-free environment and instead mandated that guys serve the greater good and emphasize the team over all else.

It’s the backbone of any successful team, but particularly in today’s NBA, where the universal embrace of the pace-and-space style has changed the landscape. Stevens pointed to the Hawks and the way they busted out last season, winning a franchise-record 60 wins and earning a trip to the Eastern Conference finals, as the prime example of a team whose success shined a light on what the Celtics are trying to create.

“Offensively, they are who they are. They are outstanding moving the ball,” Stevens said of the Hawks. “They are very intelligent. Their team savvy is off the charts. They are just really organized but still play with a lot of freedom. And they are just fun to watch … I thought it was just awesome last year they got four All-Stars because it talked about what was most important, and that’s the team winning, and all of those guys were playing great off of each other.”

The Celtics might not have four All-Star ready talents just now, but the players are convinced that the foundation and the culture for that kind of success in the future is in the works.

“I always say guys don’t play with each other, they play for each other,” Thomas said. “And on this team, it feels like a college team, for the most part. Guys aren’t running around with big egos, everybody just wants to see each other succeed. And that’s hard to find in the NBA. I think we’ve got a great group of guys and it starts with our coaching staff. Everybody has an equal opportunity to be themselves. And that’s what works for us.”

NBA Fan Night Tournament … #NBABEST



The best there ever was.

It’s an amazing distinction, one that can be argued for eternity when it comes to NBA champions, given that being the best in any given season in the best basketball league on the planet automatically qualifies a team for the best ever conversation.

Well, theoretically, of course.

There is no way to accurately compare champions from one era to the next. It’s a subjective endeavor, no matter what sort of data you bring to the party.

So do you go with the 1985 Los Angeles Lakers or the 1983 Philadelphia 76ers? The 1986 Boston Celtics or the 1989 Detroit Pistons? The 1972 Lakers or the 1977 Portland Trail Blazers?

What about the 1992 Chicago Bulls or the 1996 Bulls? Or perhaps you’re a believer in the 2001 Lakers or the 2003 San Antonio Spurs?

Those are just some of your choices in settling this age-old debate that will be addressed this season with NBA TV’s Fan Night #NBABEST Tournament. The bracket (above) is set.

The matchups are broken down by decade, the 16-best championship teams from bygone eras (we stopped at 2010, so there’s 2012 or ’13 Heat, no 2014 Spurs or the reigning Champion Golden State Warriors … sorry LeBron James and Stephen Curry) battling it out for top honors.

We start things today with the 2006 Miami Heat against the 2008 Celtics. Dwyane Wade and Shaquille O’Neal going head-to-head with Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen and the “Big 3” Celtics. Pat Riley matching wits against Doc Rivers.

Yes, the possibilities are endless.

Join the conversation on who would win via social media (Tweet @NBATV #NBABEST1 for the 2006 Heat or #NBABEST2 for the 2008 Celtics). The results will be announced during NBA TV’s postgame coverage of tonight’s Fan Night game between the Heat and Atlanta Hawks from Miami with TNT’s and NBA TV’s Ernie Johnson, Greg Anthony and Chris Webber (7:30 p.m. ET, NBA TV).


Hang Time Road Trip: Doc And The Clippers


VIDEO: The Hang Time Road Trip crew with TNT’s Kenny Smith

By Sekou Smith

Los Angeles — We promised a strong finish to the Hang Time Road Trip 2 and we delivered.

The Los Angeles Clippers made sure of it.

Jamal Crawford

Paul Pierce

The Truth visits the #NBAHangtime crew!

A photo posted by @nbatv on

And Doc Rivers

First Paul Pierce, now Coach Doc Rivers stops by the #NBAHangtime bus!

A photo posted by @nbatv on

… helped us make sure that this California journey ended the right way.

They were honest in their assessment of where this team, a contender in every sense of the word, stands just days away from the start of the regular season. They are by no means a finished product. With so many new faces (Pierce, Josh Smith, Lance Stephenson, etc.) to weave into their “culture,” as Rivers put it, they’ll need more time to get the chemistry down.

They’ve got time. Even with all of the internal pressure they’ll put on themselves to live up to expectations, they still have time to sort through all of the things that any elite team has to deal with when it’s been tweaked.

Rivers pointed out that the difference in this case is that the Clippers didn’t tweak their core, keeping DeAndre Jordan in the fold helped them avoid having to do so.

It remains to be seen if they’ve done enough to lift themselves above a crowded field in the Western Conference playoff. We don’t know what sort of luck (sorry Draymond Green, we’ll just call it “good fortune” or whatever you want to call it) is in store, or if there is any, come playoff time. And you never know if you can keep everyone healthy.

You also have to convince everyone to sacrifice for the greater good, something Crawford and Pierce know all about at this stage of their careers (they are working on a combined 34 years of service) and something Rivers knows extremely well, having guided Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen and the Big 3 Celtics to a title in 2008.

The same sort of sacrifices made by their rivals up Oakland made to put themselves in a position to earn their Larry O’Brien Trophy in June. (And yes, the fire that fuels this rivalry burns endlessly in both directions. Rivers didn’t mince his words when discussing his recent comments about the Warriors having some good fortune on their side last season.)

Shared sacrifice is the theme that came up repeatedly during our visit with Doc and the Clippers.

Does this bunch have it in them?

Time will tell.



Don’t forget to tune in Friday Oct. 23 for the premier of The Hang Time Road Trip 2 at 7 p.m. ET on NBA TV.


VIDEO: Actor/comedian/author Ben Schwartz (Jean-Ralphio anyone) joins The Hang Time Road Trip crew

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 211) Featuring K.C. Johnson and Marc D’Amico

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — In a city as passionate about its team as Chicago Bulls fans are, and have been for years, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to make sense of what has become of Derrick Rose. The youngest winner of the NBA’s most coveted individual honor, Rose has found himself at the center of yet another loyalty-splitting situation in the Windy City and beyond.

And it has little to do with his latest injury setback, a broken orbital bone broken in the first training camp practice Tuesday, an injury that required surgery today and will sideline him for two weeks (according to the Bulls). It was Rose’s words a day earlier, during Media Day, that produced mass head scratching. He didn’t speak about winning championships and representing his city, themes that had previously been at the center of any public comments in that setting.

Instead spoke of being focused on free agency two years from now and how he’ll cash in on all of the lucrative contracts being dished out around the league and securing his family’s financial future for generations to come.

It makes sense for a superstar who has played in just 100 regular season games since winning the KIA MVP after the 2010-11 season, due to knee injuries, to take that big picture perspective on things. But it also serves as yet another reason for some to doubt whether Rose is focused on winning at all costs.

We kick off Episode 211 of The Hang Time Podcast talking Rose and all of the associated drama with K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune. Matt D’Amico, Director of digital content and team reporter for the Boston Celtics also joins us to discuss the prospects for Brad Stevens and his crew this season.

You get all of that and more on Episode 211 of The Hang Time Podcast featuring K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune and Marc D’Amico of the Boston Celtics ...


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

VIDEO: Derrick Rose speaks his mind at Media Day in Chicago. He suffered a broken left orbital bone in the Bulls’ first training camp practice a day later and will be sidelined for two weeks after surgery

Morning Shootaround — Sept. 7

VIDEO: Day Six Wrap: 2015 FIBA Americas Championship


The reinvention of Anthony Bennett is real | Minute reductions for LeBron, Kyrie | White ready to take his place in Hall of Fame | Is Bradley Beal worth the max?

No. 1: The reinvention of Anthony Bennett is real — Anthony Bennett‘s summer has been one positive step after another, as the former No. 1 overall pick works to reinvent himself and prove that he’s not the “bust” some have labeled him. His work with Team Canada has only bolstered his cause. He’s been a bit of a revelation during the FIBA Americas tournament, playing a vital role on his national team, as Ryan Wolstat of the Toronto Sun writes:

Anthony Bennett didn’t have the loudest stat-line, but Canada’s resurgent star continues to be a key contributor for the squad.

Bennett quickly earned the confidence of head coach Jay Triano at training camp, was perhaps the best performer at the Pan Am Games in Toronto and was solid in Puerto Rico, before faring well here as well.

“I think Anthony Bennett’s summer has been absolutely fantastic for us,” Triano said after Canada defeated Panama on Sunday.

“He’s engaged in everything that we do on the floor, off the floor, rebounding. We’ve asked him to rebound, and he’s done it on a continuous basis. He runs the floor on a continuous basis. He provides help on the defensive end. He understands our defensive system.”

Confidence is important to Bennett and with Triano letting him just go out and play, he seems relaxed and is having fun. He looked relaxed before the game, throwing down a self-alley-oop reverse dunk in the layup line, and kept going from there.

“Coach was saying, ‘just line ’em up and knock ’em down,’ ” Bennett said.

“This is definitely a fun tournament to play in. A lot of competition, different teams, different styles so you’ve just got to adjust.”

Triano is pleased for the former No. 1 overall draft pick, who has had a tough first couple of NBA seasons.

“We told him earlier this summer if you do those things people are going to understand he’s got a lot of other offensive skills,” Triano said.

“His ability to pass the basketball, his ability to get teammates open. I’m really happy for him as an individual and we need him to continue to play that way.”


No. 2: Minute reductions for LeBron, Kyrie — The workload LeBron James and Kyrie Irving put in during their first season together in Cleveland won’t look the same this time around, and that’s not just because Kyrie might not be available until January due to injury. It’s time for a reduction in minutes for both of the Cavaliers’ stars, according to Terry Pluto of the Plain Dealer:

There was a report about Kyrie Irving not being ready to play until January.

No one knows for sure, as Irving is recovering from surgery to repair a fractured knee cap. But the Cavs do expect him to play well before January. Of course, that can change once they see him in training camp.

Even if Irving’s knee is in excellent shape, they plan to cut his minutes early in the season. He ranked No. 3 in average minutes per game last season. LeBron James was No. 5. I recently wrote about this.

That’s too much for both players during the regular season.

The Cavs signed veteran Mo Williams, who has started 511 games in the NBA. That includes 33 at point guard last season. He averaged 14 points and can take some of the scoring load off Irving in the backcourt.

The Cavs also have Matthew Dellavedova coming back. So they have Williams and Dellavedova to help out at point guard, allowing Irving to miss some games. He also can play fewer minutes.

The re-signing of J.R. Smith should help the Cavs cut the minutes for James during the regular season. The 6-foot-6 Smith can play both shooting guard and small forward.


No. 3: White ready to take his place in the Hall of Fame — Jo Jo White has had Hall of Fame credentials for years, but only now is the former Boston Celtics great taking his rightful place alongside other Celtics greats in Springfield. Even though the honor seems long overdue, White is appreciative that his time has finally come. Gary Washburn of the Boston Globe explains:

In playing in seven All-Star Games, being named MVP of the 1976 NBA Finals, and with a franchise-record 488 consecutive games played for the Celtics, White possessed Hall of Fame credentials. But it appears the Naismith committee has been slow to embrace some players from the 1970s who were perhaps overshadowed by the likes of Julius Erving, George Gervin, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Although White’s accomplishments in the game have always been greatly appreciated in Boston, it has taken years for others to recognize his career as more than just above average.

“I’m just excited and I loved playing sports,” White said. “To touch the athletes you’ve played with, coaches that you had to deal with, and you find you’re getting very, very close to the team that you’re working with. What I’ve went through as a player, I’m just excited.

“I’m still rejoicing from where I’ve gone to where I am to what I had to go through to get where I am. I’ve gone through it.”


No. 4: Is Bradley Beal worth the max? — The Washington Wizards will have to figure out an answer to that question soon enough. A maxed out backcourt tandem of All-Star point guard John Wall and the sweet-shooting Beal could be on the horizon for a team with grand designs of climbing the ladder in the Eastern Conference in the coming seasons. Moke Hamilton of Basketball Insiders ponders the question a full summer ahead of time:

In all likelihood, Beal, whom the Wizards can make a restricted free agent next summer, will command a maximum offer sheet from some team at that time. Quite a few teams will have truckloads of cap space and can have a Brinks truck arrive at the residence of Beal at 12:01 a.m. on July 1, 2016. Until that time, though, since the Wizards will have the right of first refusal, it makes sense for them to wait—just like the Warriors did with Green, just like the Chicago Bulls did with Jimmy Butler and just like the San Antonio Spurs did with Kawhi Leonard.

Make no mistake about it, though, Beal is a maximum player in today’s NBA. That is true despite the fact that he has never played as many as 75 games in any one of his three seasons. It is also true despite the defensive ineptitude that he has shown on a fairly consistent basis over the course of his young career. And yes, it is true despite the fact that he has not consistently shown that he can impact the game on multiple fronts. Above all, he is regarded as a strong offensive player and a deadly three-point shooter (his career three-point conversation rate is about 42 percent). His ability to create his own shot has improved tremendously, and, still at just 22 years old, he is nowhere near his physical prime. As he ages and matures, he will only get better.

Indeed, in today’s NBA, contract impasses are nothing extraordinary. But as it relates to Beal, with his upside, his production thus far and the influx of money that the NBA will see over the next few years, even a blind man can see that this movie ends the same way as the ones we have just witnessed.

In Washington, D.C. or elsewhere, Beal is a maximum player. Drawing that conclusion is the easy part. The difficult part, for the Wizards, is determining whether or not he will fulfill the lofty expectations that such a contract would yield and whether they want to be the team to roll the dice on him.

But best believe, in today’s NBA, someone will.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Jahlil Okafor is ready to tote the load for the Philadelphia 76ers … The players had a huge hand in the look and design of the Hawks’ new uniformsKyle Lowry chats about his summer slim downDwyane Wade was in attendance for one of the craziest games on college football’s kickoff weekend

ICYMI: The Sixers have good reason to be excited about Nerlens Noel:

VIDEO: Nerlens Noel’s Top 10 Plays from his All-Rookie first team season

Heat continue to shed salary, trade Zoran Dragic to Celtics

VIDEO: Zoran Dragic shows off his handle during Summer League action for the Miami Heat

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The Miami Heat’s summer roster clean up continues with yet another trade, this time it is sending Zoran Dragic to the Boston Celtics in exchange for a heavily protected second-round Draft pick. This latest move comes a day after the news broke that they had agreed to trade Shabazz Napier to Orlando for another heavily protected second-round Draft pick.

Both deals will save the Heat some serious cash, more than $11 million in both salary and luxury tax penalties. The Heat also sent a 2020 second-round Draft pick and cash considerations to the Celtics in the Dragic deal.

Shaving salary usually comes at a price. But the Heat have carefully crafted a roster for the 2015-16 season that could land them in a prime position to rise up the ranks in the Eastern Conference playoff chase, provided their biggest stars are healthy for the start of this season.

Dragic’s brother Goran Dragic signed a five-year $85 million free agent deal this summer, solidifying a core group that is anchored by veteran stars Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and Luol Deng.  The gap between the Cleveland Cavaliers and the rest of the pack in the Eastern Conference could be substantial, based on how the Cavaliers finished the season and the moves made by the Cavs and the rest of the field this summer in free agency.


Celtics have stake in Jordan outcome

VIDEO: Marcus Smart leads Celtics to victory over Spurs.

SALT LAKE CITY — And then there’s the interested observer.

The Celtics are potentially the second-biggest beneficiary from DeAndre Jordan leaving the Mavericks at the alter Wednesday to stay with the Clippers, but president of basketball operations Danny Ainge said a night later that he only watched the frenzy from afar for the theater of it all, not for the draft pick.

It’s the draft pick, though, that draws outsider Boston into the Jordan-Clippers-Mavericks madness. The Celtics get Dallas’ first-round pick in 2016 if it is not in the top seven, which would have been a decent chip if it landed in the 20s after a successful regular season but now suddenly looks like a very valuable commodity with the unexpected development that the Mavs could be in the lottery. If it doesn’t pay out in the next draft, the selection sent as part of the return for Rajon Rondo (speaking of situations gone painfully wrong for Big D), carries over to 2017, also top-seven protected.

But, Ainge said Thursday at EnerySolutions Arena as the Celtics concluded their part in the Utah Jazz Summer League with an 85-71 victory over the Spurs, there was no added interest as the drama unfolded from Texas to California. If the Celtics were watching the developments, sometimes playing out on social media as players from the Clippers and Mavericks both announced travel plans via Twitter emojis, it was just along with everyone else, not with a stake in the outcome.

“You know what, we have our issues to deal with,” Ainge said. “I really don’t have much time to worry about what other teams are dealing with. It was an interesting and entertaining night on Twitter.”

But, the chance to make the playoffs in the East and still get a lottery pick via Dallas.

“I’m not looking forward to next year’s draft yet,” Ainge countered. “That’s way too far in advance. We’re just trying to get our team ready.”

That has included a busy offseason of drafting Terry Rozier and R.J. Hunter in the first round, Jordan Mickey and Marcus Thornton in the second, added Amir Johnson as a free agent while re-signing Jonas Jerebko and Jae Crowder, and trading for David Lee in a deal that has yet to become official. The Celtics made moves. They just didn’t land the hoped-for major free agent, so when Ainge was asked about the supposed positive outcome of Boston making some moves while also retaining cap space for the future, he understandably did not consider that a great thing.

“We would have loved to have upgraded our talent even more and not had flexibility, if that’s what you’re asking me,” Ainge said. “Yeah, it’s a good option. Not the best option, but it’s a good option.”


Smart finally healing from ankle injury

SALT LAKE CITY — The official word is that Marcus Smart missed 10 Celtics games last season with a sprained left ankle, from Nov. 8 through Dec. 2, and two more with a strained Achilles’ tendon in the same leg in what was probably a related injury.

Lies, all lies.

The truth as Smart sees it, the truth as he looks back in reflection, is that the ankle injury cost him essentially his 2014-15, even as he made 67 appearances in the regular season and four more in the first-round sweep at the hands of the Cavaliers, even as he played well enough to make second-team All-Rookie.

The injury was that bad, Smart says as his second season officially begins with the Celtics at the Utah Jazz Summer League. It was worse than he let on at the time.

“It was,” Smart said Tuesday night after resting as Boston lost to the 76ers 76-62 at EnergySolutions Arena. “I had times when I would wake up in the morning and could barely walk out of bed. I would get to the gym three or four hours before practice or before a game just to get it warmed up and make it bearable for me to actually get out there and run up and down on it. If you watch carefully you can kind of see it. I still played with a little limp. I just tried not to show it.

“I couldn’t really drive the ball. Everybody wondered why I wasn’t driving the ball, why I was taking so many (outside) shots. I couldn’t really explode and get where I wanted to go. Being a right-handed player, you jump off your left foot. Not being able to do that, it kind of stopped me from being able to do the things that I like to do. On the defensive end it slowed me down a little bit. My physicality made up for it, though.”

Smart estimated he played months at about 60 percent strength in the leg and was never better than the 75 percent late in the season and into the playoffs. The ankle injury in the fifth game of the season led to a three-week layoff, then to problems with the Achilles’ tendon, then to adversity until the very end.

“The whole season,” he said. “It bothered me the whole season while I was playing.”

It hurt for a month after the season ended. The lower left leg is feeling better now, he reports, with plans to continue to play in the summer league after logging 30 minutes in the opener Monday against the Jazz, and bigger plans for fall: reminding the Celtics why they used the No. 6 pick to get him and the rest of the league how good he can be as an athletic, physical point guard at 6-4 and 220 pounds.

“Just go out there and show I can get to the rim, I can get where I want to go when I’m healthy,” Smart said. “I could be a special player in this league, especially if I’m healthy and I keep working.”


Pop’s, Doc’s Game 7 Numbers Tell Story

VIDEO: Spurs coach Gregg Popovich poked his team after their Game 6 loss at home to the Clippers

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Ask most observers who they would like to have pushing buttons in a winner-take-all, NBA playoff Game 7 and they’d tell you Gregg Popovich, Doc Rivers or both.

The most accomplished coach of his era (Pop) against the best motivator of his era (Doc), they’ve got the championships and big game experience oozing out of their pores with Saturday’s Game 7 of their first round series at Staples Center looming on an overstuffed sports weekend, the likes of which we might not see again anytime soon.

The NFL Draft, the Kentucky Derby, Mayweather-Pacquiao and, of course, that almighty Game 7 between the reigning champion San Antonio Spurs and wanna-be champs Los Angeles Clippers. It’s all there for your consumption this weekend.

But nothing beats the pressure-packed chaos of a Game 7 and to get it with two of the marquee coaches in the game, with Hollywood as the backdrop … it doesn’t get much better.

And when you toss in the metrics, things get even more interesting.

Doc has a 5-5 career record in Game 7s, 5-2 at home. Pop is 3-2 in his career, 1-1 on the road.

Doc and the Clippers have the most compelling numbers on their side is the 79.8 percent winning percentage (95-24) home teams own in Game 7s. But on the flip side, there has been a road win in a Game 7 in each of the past three postseasons and all in the first round (Brooklyn over Toronto in 2014, Chicago over Brooklyn in 2013 and the Clippers over Memphis in 2012).

Does it mean anything?

Not really. At least not in a tangible way that either the Clippers or Spurs will be able to use after opening tip.

Both Pop and Doc won Game 7s on their home floors last season, the Spurs beat back Dallas in the first round last season and the Clippers did it a day earlier against Golden State. So they have fresh memories of what needs to be done in this situation, as do their teams.

For all of Pop’s playoff experience, no active NBA coach knows the rigors of Game 7s the way Doc does. The Boston Celtics played in seven of them during his time running the show there, his veteran crew tested in each and every way imaginable during their glory days together.

All that said, the Spurs’ lone Game 7 win on the road in four tries, came in 2008 against the New Orleans Hornets and their All-Star point guard … one Chris Paul.

If you believe in any of the minutiae, that any of these numbers have a story tell, that should be more than enough to chew on between now and game time.

As much as we’d like to make this about the coaches, the bottom line is the players, on both sides, will have the final say.

Does Tim Duncan have one more superstar effort in him? Can CP3 finally slay the dragon and drive his team over the proverbial hump? Can Blake Griffin keep it going? Or will Kawhi Leonard win the battle of the young big men? Can J.J. Redick play hero? Will Tony Parker shake off whatever ails him and deliver like the former Finals MVP he is? Will DeAndre Jordan makes his free throws? And who serves as the Game 7 wild card among Jamal Crawford, Manu Ginobili, Austin Rivers, Patty Mills, Matt Barnes and Boris Diaw?

Someone will have to decide who moves on to the conference semifinals and that date with the Houston Rockets.

And instead of it being Pop or Doc, it will have to be someone else … then again, perhaps it’s best to go with the guys with the Game 7 track records.

VIDEO: Clippers coach Doc Rivers talks about his team’s mettle down the stretch in their Game 6 win over the Spurs

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 199) Dirty Play or Playoff Basketball?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Dirty play or just playoff basketball?

It’s a legitimate question to ask now that the postseason fate of LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and the Cleveland Cavaliers has been tweaked by two plays that occurred in the Cavaliers’ Game 4 win over the Boston Celtics Sunday at TD Garden.

Kelly Olynyk‘s arm bar on Kevin Love yanked Love’s shoulder out of socket. The dislocation and subsequent labrum tear will keep him out of the Eastern Conference semifinals and perhaps the remainder of the postseason, according to Cavaliers’ general manager David Griffin. J.R. Smith‘s two-game suspension for knocking out Celtics swingman Jae Crowder will also have a huge impact on the start of that next series for the Cavaliers, who will be down two starters whenever they hit the floor.

What looks like a dirty play to one set of eyes is nothing more than playoff intensity-level basketball, good and physical play that we’ve all come to expect at this time of year from players and teams around the league. Which side of that line you come down on depends on your perspective. Love called Olynyk’s play “bush league” and James said it was “not a basketball play.”

The same could be said of Smith’s, no-look, swinging right-hook that knocked Crowder to the ground. Again, it depends on whose perspective you subscribe to and also what era of the NBA you were raised on.

Whatever your view, the playoffs, certainly in the Eastern Conference, were changed fundamentally with just two plays. And we factor that into our discussion about the postseason and where it goes from here on Episode 199 of The Hang Time Podcast: Dirty Play or Playoff Basketball?


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business, Andrew Merriman.

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VIDEO: Kevin Love talks to the media after dislocating his shoulder in Game 4 against the Boston Celtics