Posts Tagged ‘Carmelo Anthonny’

Morning shootaround — Sept. 3

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Union director hopes for smooth sailing with NBA | Winslow ready to transition to the NBA | Karl has Melo experience to help dealings with Cousins | Can Deron reclaim greatness?

No. 1: Union director hopes for smooth sailing with NBA The negotiations between the owners and player’s union are still over a year away, if that, and both sides have kept things cordial and cooperative for the most part. Michele Roberts hopes it stays that way. The executive director spoke optimistically about her relationship with Adam Silver and how the players have come to trust her leadership. Here’s an excerpt from a Q-and-A interview she gave Sportando

Q: As soon as you started you declared that the union was divided and not well represented: how is the situation now?

A: “Many players were skeptical on the importance of the union, especially for the behavior of my predecessor.
We regained credibility and players’ confidence.”

Q: Who is the most “unionized”?

A: “The desire to be part of the union is a widespread feeling. There are players completely immersed in the union activities (Chris Paul is the president, LeBron James and the first vice President, and in the executive committee there is also the mvp Steph Curry. It would be easy to think that players with huge financial success are not very interested, but it’s just the opposite. ”

Q: How can the potential lockout be avoided in 2017?

A: “Sitting down at a table already now with the NBA to understand what worries the owners and what worries the players. In the past very few attempts to speak in advance of the problems that led to the lockouts have been made. Whether Both commissioner Silver and myself want to do everything possible to prevent the NBA to stop: the only way is to negotiate. We have already started, we will meet again in early September with the hope to announce within the end of the season that the union and the league have solved their problems. ”

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No. 2: Winslow ready to transition to NBA The Heat found a surprise selection  in the summer draft in Justise Winslow, and the rookie guard is doing everything in his power to keep the franchise counting its blessings. Fresh off of winning a national championship at Duke, Winslow says he’s locked into championship mode and hopes to help Miami win another. Here’s Winslow in an interview with Ira Winderman of the Sun-Sentinel

Winslow operated as a primary ballhandler during summer league, but that was while operating as the primary focus of the offense. The next challenge will be to find his way alongside Dwyane Wade, Goran Dragic and Chris Bosh.

“Just playing alongside all the great players, some of the things will be limited,” he acknowledged. “So just trying to find spots where if I’m in the game with Dwyane Wade, Dragic and Bosh, how I can be most efficient?”

In many ways, Winslow’s approach during summer league, especially when he got off to a solid start in the Orlando Pro Summer League, was similar to that of Wade. That could have him featured in a comparable role off the bench, in relief of Wade.

“If not playing a lot of point,” he said, “just playing a lot with the ball in my hands. If I’m with the first unit, second unit, just ball screens at the top of the key, a lot of what I did in summer league out in Orlando.

“It’s going to be good. The way they use me, I think it’s going to be really special and really going to help me showcase a lot of my skills.”

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No. 3: Karl has Melo experience to help dealings with Cousins — At times it was a rocky summer for George Karl and the Kings’ franchise player, DeMarcus Cousins. To say the two didn’t see eye-to-eye would be an understatement. Cousins thought Karl was trying to get him traded, which Karl always denied, and there was a chill in the air. Apprently, the two have patched most of their differences and yet their relationship will bear watching this season. Karl has had a tricky relationship with a superstar before; Carmelo Anthony and the coach had a few disagreements (though it never got personal). Here’s Zach Harper of CBS Sports on how those years with Melo should serve as a springboard to this season with Cousins …

This is how Kings ownership and management want this team to play: Run opponents off the floor and light up the scoreboard.

Problem is, Sacramento’s best player is DeMarcus Cousins, who wouldn’t seem to fit the mold of a player who would thrive in a fast-paced system. So how do the Kings become the team they want to be? How does George Karl find a way to build a fast-paced, highly efficient offense with DeMarcus Cousins as the focal point?

Perhaps the answer lies in Carmelo Anthony.

Karl can indeed look to his final campaign with Carmelo Anthony in Denver as a bit of inspiration for figuring this out. While it’s obvious that Anthony and Cousins are very much different players who occupy different positions, the way in which they attack and the distribution of their respective shots are relatively similar. Prior to trading Melo to the New York Knicks during the 2010-11 season, Denver had the best offense in the NBA with Melo as a primary focus. During that season, Karl found a balance between pushing the ball while also utilizing a high volume scorer.

Cousins actually isn’t the ball-stopper Melo has historically been. In fact, only Joakim Noah, Blake Griffin, and Josh Smith had a higher assist rate as a big man last season than Cousins (20.4 percent). However, he is a high volume scorer and someone the Kings will want to maximize in the half-court while still making sure to push the ball. In the 50 games Melo played under Karl in ’10-’11 and the 19 games Cousins played under Karl in ’14-’15, the distribution of where the two players did the majority of their damage is similar.

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No. 4: Can Deron Williams reclaim greatness? The easy answer to that is “no.” But Williams will get the chance in his hometown to show that he can have a second life in the NBA. He’ll need to prove not only to himself, but to Dirk Nowitzki and Mark Cuban that the last few years in Brooklyn were a mirage, or at least not totally indicative of what he’s capable of doing. Here’s a report on Williams from Fansided …

The Dallas Mavericks made headlines this offseason with the temporary agreement they came to with Los Angeles center, DeAndre Jordan. Days after agreeing to join the Mavs, DeAndre had a well-publicized change of heart, instead preferring the comforts (and money) of home in LA.

The results of this spurning sent the Mavericks into disarray, as they scrambled to build a roster made with whatever was leftover in free agency. Forced to get creative, the Mavericks started turning their attention to the trade market and waiver wire.

After making some relatively pedestrian moves, the Mavericks were able to lure a former target of their affection, Deron Williams. Williams, an underachiever as well as max contract player, came to a buyout agreement with the Brooklyn Nets. The move freed him to sign with his hometown Mavs, in an attempt to rekindle a once exceptional career.

Exceptional is a strong word, but by no means is it an exaggeration. Deron Williams, 31, was once considered one of the top young point guards in the NBA. He was so good, there was an active debate in NBA circles as to whether he, or Chris Paul, were the best at their craft. If one was “1”, then the other was “1a”.

Deron Williams began his NBA career as the #3 overall pick of the Utah Jazz. The PG from Illinois didn’t take long to make an impression in the NBA, averaging 10.8 points and 4.5 assists per game, while shooting .416% from 3-point range.

The next four years in Utah, Williams averaged over 18 points and 10 assists per game as he established himself as one of the best players in the NBA. From there, the Deron Williams story started to go south.

After increasingly frequent spats with NBA legendary coach, Jerry Sloan, the unthinkable happened. Sloan resigned his post as coach and Deron Williams was traded to the Nets. After testing free agency, Williams opted to re-sign with the Nets, rather than move back to the D/FW area and play for his home team.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Clippers will reveal a mascot this season, the first by any NBA team in L.A., unless you count Jack Nicholson … The assistant for Gilbert Arenas has been convicted of stealing millions from the former All-Star
 

Morning shootaround — July 25


VIDEO: Harrison Barnes hangs out with FC Barcelona


NEWS OF THE MORNING
Barnes wants long-term stay with Warriors | Hibbert looking to shape up in LA | Len thinks Chandler will help, not hurt, his career | Okafor excited to get started with Sixers

No. 1: Harrison Barnes wants long-term stay with Warriors The Warriors had a rather uneventful offseason from the standpoint of change. They didn’t add a big free agent or draft in the lottery, and their status quo was secured once Draymond Green inked an extension, which was expected. There’s a reason the Warriors didn’t look to change much: They did win the title and their core is mainly young with upside. If Harrison Barnes has his choice, he’d like to remain part of that nucleus when his deal comes up next summer. Barnes has played a useful role with the Warriors and while he’s not a star, at least not yet, he’d be in demand if he ever reached free agency. Here’s Barnes speaking to Diamond Leung of the Bay Area News Group

“I mean, we just won a championship,” Barnes said. “Of course I’d love to keep this group together for many years to come, you know what I’m saying? So that’s obvious.”

Barnes, 23, and the Warriors face an Oct. 31 deadline for getting an extension signed. If the sides cannot reach agreement by then, he is expected to become a restricted free agent at the end of next season.

Warriors co-owner Joe Lacob has most recently re-signed homegrown talent, giving Klay Thompson a four-year, $70 million extension and Draymond Green a five-year, $82 million contract. Barnes acknowledged that seeing his teammates get deals done gives him confidence.

“It’s a good fit,” Barnes said of the Warriors, who value the 6-foot-8 player’s versatility. “Obviously, you want to continue to get better. One thing Coach (Steve) Kerr and I talked about at the end of the season was just how can I get better in the spots I was used last year — post game, ballhandling more, bringing the ball up in transition and pushing, getting it to shooters, that type of thing. There’s a lot of obvious areas for growth and improvement, and this is a conducive system for that.”

Barnes said he would probably work with Warriors executive board member Jerry West again in Los Angeles after doing so last year on the heels of struggling in his second season in the league.

“The biggest thing for me is just to work on my game,” Barnes said. “Obviously you won a championship, and the goal is to do it again.

“This is obviously a big year for everyone. We have a young team. I think we still have a lot of room to grow, and we have to capitalize on that.”

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No. 2: Roy Hibbert looking to shape up with the Lakers Last season wasn’t the best for Roy Hibbert. Matter of fact, it was rather costly from the standpoint of keeping him in Indiana. Pacers president Larry Bird made it clear that the team wanted to move on, and Hibbert soon made his way to the rebuilding Lakers. Crazy: Just a few summers ago, Hibbert had a tremendous playoff run and was a top-10 center in the NBA. Now? He must repair his reputation and maybe his career, and it starts in L.A., where he’s anxious to get started. As Bill Orem writes in the Orange County Register, Hibbert is looking for a fresh start and a better situation …

Roy Hibbert was a lost cause. A lumbering center with little offensive game and a disinterested temperament, they were happy pawning him off for nothing more than a future second-round draft pick.

The Lakers, however, view Hibbert as a player who can not only regain his standing as an All-Star big man, but anchor their anemic defense, which last year ranked second-worst in the NBA.

“I expect to play at an All-Star defensive level, and everything else will come,” Hibbert said.

“In this business,” Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak said, “if you can have somebody who’s that size, who’s 28 years old, that clearly wants to rebirth his career, I think that’s a good risk.”

Hibbert averaged 10.6 points and 7.1 rebounds for the Pacers last season. He is just a year removed from his second All-Star campaign, and helping Indiana to the Eastern Conference finals.

He remains a reputable defender. The Pacers last season allowed 101.1 points per 100 possessions when he was on the floor. The Lakers, by contrast, allowed 108.

Hibbert has averaged 1.9 blocked shots per game in his seven NBA seasons, but Kupchak said that won’t solve the Lakers’ defensive problems alone.

“It all can’t fall to his plate,” Kupchak said. “If you’re on the perimeter, you can’t just let your guy get past you and say, ‘Oh, Roy is back there.’ It doesn’t work that way. Everybody is going to have to buy in defensively and make a commitment defensively.

Hibbert hopes to join a storied tradition of big men to find success with the Lakers. He said he grew up studying Shaquille O’Neal and has worked out extensively with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

“He gives me the little tidbits,” Hibbert said. “I worked with him a lot last year in the summer and he keeps up with me. He always gives me some advice, some things to work on. I always ask him questions.”

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No. 3: Alex Len happy to have Tyson Chandler around It was a pretty weird situation, watching the Suns give four years to the well-seasoned Tyson Chandler while they were trying to develop Alex Len, their lottery pick two years ago. And to hear Len, it was surprising to him, too. But after he gave it more thought, Len figures Chandler will actually be beneficial to a young center trying to learn the nuances of the game and become a useful rotation player. At least that’s what he told Michael Lee of the Washington Post

Instead of an immediate opportunity lost, Len focused on the possible long-term benefits.

“He’s one of the best defensive bigs in the league. The way he blocks shots, the way he communicates. I think I can learn just from watching, just from being around him, add it to my game. I think it’s going to be great,” Len said. “He’s a great leader. We needed a veteran last year. Somebody in the locker room, on the court, somebody we can look up to. So, I think it’s great for the team.”

Though he was selected fifth overall out of Maryland in 2013, Len wasn’t expected to quickly come in and resurrect the franchise – especially since he ditched his crutches from left ankle surgery just to walk across the stage to meet then-commissioner David Stern on the night of the draft. Len’s rookie season was lost because of nagging ankle troubles — “I just throw that out,” he said of his forgettable first season — but he started to look the part of a serviceable big man in his second season, showing a soft touch for a 7-footer and the necessary aggressiveness required to make countless screens on a pick-and-roll heavy team.

The Suns have been happy with Len’s progress but want to improve at a much faster pace than the time required for him to become a well-rounded player. In an effort to land the all-star talent needed to truly compete in the stacked Western Conference, Phoenix targeted the best free agent in the open market — LaMarcus Aldridge — and knew that he wanted to play power forward and to be paired with an experienced NBA center. Chandler agreed to a four-year, $52 million agreement in time to sit at the table to recruit Aldridge, who strongly considered leaving Portland for Phoenix before deciding to join the San Antonio Spurs.

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No. 4: Jahlil Okafor too excited to get started in Philly  — While there are plenty of reasons for pessimism in Philly concerning the Sixers this upcoming season, given the injury status of Joel Embiid and a roster that still isn’t teeming with top-shelf talent, their No. 1 pick wants to make it clear: He’s happy. Jahlil Okafor wasn’t taken by the Lakers, which was the pre-Draft scuttlebutt, and instead landed with the Sixers. He’s not going to Philly kicking and screaming; rather, he’s looking forward to the experience and has big plans. He told Michael Lee of the Washington Post all about it …

The 76ers are certainly hopeful that Okafor will develop into a cornerstone for a rebuilding effort that is slow to take shape. Using a be-bad-and-pray-for-some-luck strategy, Philadelphia General Manager Sam Hinkie has inspired plenty of doubt around the league and nearly imposed lottery reform.

Over the past two years, the 76ers have traded serviceable NBA players for draft picks and used lottery picks on injured players while stashing another in Europe. As a result, they have won 39 games the past two seasons. Okafor won 35 games in his lone season at Duke but isn’t intimidated by the challenge ahead in the NBA, with an organization still seeking an identity.

Milwaukee Bucks forward Jabari Parker, a Chicago native, Duke alumnus and one of Okafor’s best friends, has been advising the talented big man with the throwback low-post moves on what to expect in the NBA. Like Okafor, Parker has dealt with the immense scrutiny of being a prodigy, played for Coach Mike Krzyzewski, and was taken with a top-three pick to join an organization that won fewer than 20 games the previous year.

“It will help the adjustment period,” Parker said of Okafor’s experience of being in the spotlight, “but it’s on a different scale. He has a lot to learn, because he’s been given a pedestal and a lot of responsibility but it’s nothing he can’t handle. He’s going to be in the NBA a long time. So he has to. He doesn’t have a choice.”

“My role is to dominate,” Okafor said. “I’m one of the centerpieces of the team, so my role is the same.”

Embiid’s injury, combined with the Los Angeles Lakers selecting point guard D’Angelo Russell ahead of Okafor, forced Hinkie to take the best player on the board, regardless of position. After initially wondering if he was drafted to be traded, Okafor was assured the 76ers want to build around him.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Utah Jazz are thinking about changing their primary logo ASAP … Although he missed the latter half of last season with knee issues, Carmelo Anthony will attend (but probably not play in) the Team USA workouts … The Pelicans still have some roster decisions to make, starting with Norris Cole.

Attention-loving Porzingis made for New York City


VIDEO: First impressions of Kristaps Porzingis

LAS VEGAS — Not everything appears at it seems in this town, where fortunes can come and go in a flash and hopes can rise like the triple-digit temperatures. It’s a weird place for Kristaps Porzingis to begin selling himself as the future of the Knicks, yet he’s doing just that.

Let’s start with the one intangible that weighs heavily: Porzingis laughs easily and dismisses criticism with a disarming smile. Good. That skill will come in handy over the next year or so. In that sense, the 7-3 center from Latvia is made for the harsh city, a tabloid-fueled place that is likely to fall in love with the rookie, from a personality standpoint, even if the 19-year-old gets off to an understandably slow start.

“He handles himself well,” said coach Derek Fisher. “This kid won’t let anything get to him.”

We’re moving a bit to fast here, but if Porzingis ever becomes an All-Star someday, he will own New York more than Carmelo Anthony. A smart, funny foreigner with J. Crew looks who loves the city with all of its benefits and flaws? When’s the last time anyone could say that about a Knick?

When asked how he handled his nerves in his debut, Porzingis said quickly: “I told myself to chill out.”

His English is amazingly sharp and he carries himself well. Basically, he gets it, even at a very young age. of course, there’s still the big question: Can he play?

Well, that won’t be known in summer league, which should be taken for what it’s worth. Still, after four days in Vegas, he hasn’t backed down. He’s built like a Twizzler but isn’t afraid to mix it up. He goes in traffic with the ball and also after the ball for rebounds. He has challenged players at the rim and is showing a knack for blocking shots. Again, Summer League is all about learning if the player has the basics to survive in the NBA, and Porzingis is showing that.

The main drawback for Porzingis is his lack of strength. He’ll get easily boxed out for rebounds when the real games begin. And his dribble game is merely adequate.

The Knicks were smitten by his height, his athletic ability and his jumper, and so far have no reason to be disappointed. Porzingis has the shooting range to stretch defenses. He can be very useful in the pick-and-pop (assuming his body can withstand the pick part) and can be dangerous behind the 3-point line. And he gets to the free-throw line. Again, this is Summer League, and Porzingis is a work in progress. but the more you watch, the more you get the feeling that Phil Jackson didn’t draft the next Andrea Bargnani.

“He’s really interesting to watch and his growth is going to be interesting to see,” said Jackson. “It looks like he can hold his own out there. I think he’s going to find a comfort zone.”

OK, here’s the issue: Should Jackson have taken someone else, say Emmanual Mudiay, at No. 4? Willie Cauley-Stein? Both are also producing in Vegas and would’ve filled a need for the Knicks, who need everything.

Well, point guards aren’t too hard to find, so it’s understandable why Jackson decided to gamble on a 7-3 shooter instead of Mudiay (besides, Jackson took Notre Dame point guard Jerian Grant later in the first round). Cauley-Stein, meanwhile, is every bit the project as Porzingis, although more offensively-challenged.

For the time being, the Knicks are looking rather smart and Porzingis is looking rather comfortable. For a player who didn’t get the shine of the NCAA tournament, he’s pretty popular in Vegas, and this reception will be nothing compared to what awaits in New York.

“I love the attention,” he said.

See? He fits.

 

Brutal Knicks Wasting Melo’s Best




VIDEO: Carmelo Anthony’s 44 points came in vain as the Knicks lost to Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavericks

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — If and when Carmelo Anthony decides to leave New York, he’ll be justified in departing the premises.

The Knicks are wasting the prime of Anthony’s career, his best years, with a staggeringly putrid season that has included on-court foolishness (yes, I’m looking at you J.R. Smith) rivaled only by even more bone-headed decisions off the court (really Raymond Felton?).

For years, ‘Melo has been an easy target for haters who insist he isn’t LeBron James or Dwyane Wade or Kevin Durant. He’s the only member of the top five of that vaunted 2003 Draft class without a ring (yes, even Darko Milicic has one). But he’s done yeoman’s work this season, most of it in vain. Because the Knicks can’t get right. Injuries, dysfunctional chemistry and an overall lack of clear thinking on the part of a several folks has led to the tire fire we are all witnessing.

The Knicks have been scrambling all season trying to clean up this mess, a futile effort to clean up a mess of their own making. Waiving Metta World Peace and Beno Udrih, as they did Monday, won’t do it. They tried to move Felton prior to and up until last week’s trade deadline but could not find a taker … anywhere.

Throw the shade on Anthony or Knicks coach Mike Woodson or whoever you’d like, but make no mistake, this is a systemic problem with the Knicks that has no quick fix. We’ve heard for years that you cannot afford to “rebuild” in New York, that the rabid fan base will not allow it. That’s nonsense. The only way you get out of this mess if you are the Knicks is if you rebuild and start that process now.

And again, that is why no one should be upset with ‘Melo if he decides he wants no part of a rebuilding effort at this stage of his career and decides to chase a title elsewhere by using his free-agent escape hatch this summer.

The Knicks’ current free fall, nine losses in 11 games after Monday night’s crushing home loss to Dirk Nowitzki and the Dallas Mavericks at the buzzer, only exacerbates the problems of this season. They are running out of time to salvage this thing. They are six games out of the eighth spot in the Eastern Conference playoff chase, a post currently occupied by an Atlanta Hawks team that has won just once in its last nine games and is limping to the regular-season finish line.

The Eastern Conference, after Indiana and Miami, is basically a blank canvas and the Knicks aren’t even capable of joining that party. It’s a disastrous way for ‘Melo to spend what could (and probably should) be his final season in New York.

“It’s a damn shame,” Woodson said of the way the Knicks are squandering Anthony’s splendid individual work this season. “The way he’s played, it’s a damn shame that we’re in the position we’re in, because our team doesn’t deserve [it] and he definitely does not deserve the position that we’re in.”

Making matters worse long-term for the Knicks is that they’re loaded with awful contracts that make it virtually impossible to rectify this situation before ‘Melo can walk. The only tradeable assets the Knicks may possess are Tim Hardaway Jr. and Iman Shumpert, young talents with reasonable contracts that New York would need if it decides to start rebuilding.

They’re on the hook for $50 million in salary for Amar’e Stoudemire, Tyson Chandler and Andrea Bargnani in the 2014-15 season. And that does not include the more than $10 million owed to Smith and Felton that same season.

While we’re staring at the numbers, it should be noted that a max-deal in New York would net ‘Melo some $129 million. The most he could get from another team is $96 million. That’s a huge amount of money to leave on the table. But it wouldn’t be unprecedented. Dwight Howard made that extremely tough choice last summer, opting to chase his title in Houston rather than staying in Los Angeles with the Lakers in an environment that didn’t agree with him.

‘Melo’s specifics are different. However, the decision could end up being the same. And who could blame him for fleeing the scene of the crime that is the Knicks right now?


VIDEO: Carmelo Anthony talks after the Knicks’ home loss to the Mavs

Olympic Team Finalists Revealed

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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — In a definite sign of the times, USA Basketball released the 20 names of the 20 finalists for the 2012 Olympic team that will compete in London this summer via Facebook and Twitter this morning.

That’s right, welcome to the new world folks.

Surely, you could have guessed half of these names based on what’s transpired with the player pool the past two years. Either way, we’ve got the entire list for you right here:

Guards — Kobe Bryant, Derrick Rose, Chauncey Billups, Chris Paul, Deron Williams, Russell Westbrook, Eric Gordon and Dwyane Wade.

Forwards — Kevin Durant, LeBron James, Andre Iguodala, Carmelo Anthony, Rudy Gay, LaMarcus Aldridge, Lamar Odom, Blake Griffin, Chris Bosh and Kevin Love.

Centers — Dwight Howard and Tyson Chandler.

No surprises there, with Griffin and Aldridge joining the party and Steph Curry and Danny Granger departing the premises. That’s a group that includes eight gold medalists from the 2008 Olympics and 10 members of the 2010 gold medal-winning team at World Championships.

Obviously, this list will have to be trimmed to an active roster of 12 for the competition this summer.

Your thoughts on this 20-man group?

How Much For Melo?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — You’d think we learned our lesson by now, wading into the mess that is the Carmelo Anthony trade rumor mill.

But we haven’t. We just can’t help ourselves. The story that won’t go away deserves yet another moment of all our time before we dive headlong into All-Star Weekend and everything that comes along with the NBA’s Super Bowl of Weekends.

Anthony is the most coveted player in the league with the Feb. 24 trade deadline approaching, but there’s no telling if and when anything will get done. Because the one thing that has become clear through all of the hyperbole and innuendo in this process — no one wants to pay the price the Nuggets are asking for Anthony.

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