Posts Tagged ‘Byron Mullens’

Back And Forth With Bones: Rockets-Clippers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – Back and Forth With Bones is an e-mail exchange between NBA.com’s John Schuhmann and NBA TV’s Brent Barry during a Monday night game. This week, they sat down (Schuhmann at home in New Jersey with his leftover Halloween candy, Barry in the studio in Atlanta with Matt Winer and Dennis Scott) to watch the big Western Conference matchup between the Houston Rockets and Los Angeles Clippers.

Pre-game

Schuhmann: Hey Bones, we got Rockets-Clippers tonight. Here are some early numbers…

The Clippers lead the league in offensive efficiency and rank last in defensive efficiency. Chalk it up to small sample size (one game against Steph Curry and another against the carefree Lakers), but they’ve allowed their opponents to shoot 48 percent from 3-point range (29th) after ranking 26th in 3-point defense last season. And of course, they have three games against two of the most dangerous 3-point shooting teams in the league – Houston and Miami – this week.

The Rockets, meanwhile, are the only team in the top 5 in both offensive and defensive efficiency thus far. They’re a minus-1 in 34 minutes with both Omer Asik and Dwight Howard on the floor together, great defensively, but bad offensively. With only one of the two on the floor (and with Francisco Garcia shooting 10-for-20 on threes off the bench), they’ve been terrific on both ends. And obviously, it’s a long-term question if they’re better off keeping Asik or shopping him for someone who better complements Howard and James Harden.

What will you be watching for tonight?

Barry: I’m interested to see how Doc Rivers uses Blake Griffin while Houston plays big. Tough for them to cover stretch fours, but Blake is not that. So let’s see if he uses quick moves or takes comfy Js.

Clips bigs must stay out of foul trouble or else Mullens might get some run to stretch the lineup.

I’m not sure how Harden gets defended, but I would hope guards press up a bit since they are not good at the line. It’s a bad matchup for the Clips if they think they can outscore them.

Schuhmann: Griffin is 1-for-9 from outside the paint through the first three games, so yeah, he’s not going to make Dwight think twice about hanging out in the paint.

1st quarter

The Clippers shot 16-for-23 in the opening 12 minutes, scoring 42 points on 27 possessions. J.J. Redick led the way with 15 and Jared Dudley found himself wide open beyond the arc as well. Even Blake Griffin got in the act, hitting a pair of jumpers. Dwight Howard, meanwhile, picked up two fouls by the 6:24 mark and had to sit. He returned late in the period, but then picked up his third less than a minute later. The Rockets’ offense found a rhythm with just one big on the floor, but a hole had already been dug.

Schuhmann: J.J. Redick is hunting shots early and making Harden work on D. Clips have scored 15 points on 10 possessions.

Barry: Fouls and hot start forces Chandler Parsons switch.

Barry: Houston, coming off the Utah game, does not look to be nervous about being down but this is NOT the Jazz and this point guard does not like to lose.

Classic foul trouble disrupts rhythm.

2nd quarter (LAC leads, 42-25)

The Rockets’ cut the Clippers lead from 17 to six by scoring 22 points on their first 10 possessions of the quarter, with their third center – Greg Smith – scoring eight of the 22. The Clippers steadied themselves when their starters returned and led by 12 at the half.

Schuhmann: Last year’s LAC second-unit gave them great D with Eric Bledsoe, Matt Barnes, Lamar Odom &  Ronny Turiaf, and Jamal Crawford scored enough to build on leads. This is one of my big questions with them this year.

Barry: Agreed. Much different complexion of the bench and Barnes takes a ton of chances on D that hurt their schemes.

Barry: Barnes not healthy either, aggravated injury there. Starters prepped for pace but 2nd unit not up to speed.

Schuhmann: CP with 10 dimes in 12 minutes and I can’t say that he’s had to work hard for them. They can come easy with so many weapons who are willing to run the floor and move without the ball.


Barry: Both J.J. and Jared taking practice shots.

Halftime (LAC leads, 78-66)


Schuhmann: That was a ridiculously fast pace. 56 possessions each in the first half. I would think that Houston would be the team that would prefer to slow it down, to get Dwight involved both offensively and defensively.

Barry: Doc said he wants pace before the game, interestingly enough.

3rd quarter

With the Rockets going back to their twin-tower lineup to start the third, the pace slowed. They got Howard into the game offensively, but were unable to cut into the lead.

Schuhmann: As much as I love the Rockets’ pick-and-roll, the Clips bigs are pretty poor defensively in the post. DeAndre Jordan offering no resistance to Howard there.

Barry: And I don’t like, other than CP3, who they have come to double down.


Barry: No big lineup for the Clips. Mullens doesn’t count.

4th quarter (LAC leads, 104-89)

Scoring on their first five possessions of the period, the Rockets cut the deficit to nine and had the ball back. But Garcia missed a three and Jordan took a nice feed from Jamal Crawford to push the lead back to double-digits. Paul then took over  – 10 points and three assists in 3 1/2 minutes – and the Clippers put the game away.

Schuhmann: Harden has 15 & 5, but has been pretty terrible tonight, especially defensively.

Barry: Pretty much mentally out of it. Clips with no control of pace without Paul has hurt them tonight.

Schuhmann: Downside to Dwight post-ups: As much as he’s killing them down there, it’s too easy to just foul him.


Barry: Clips’ D not very disciplined yet. Rotations and awareness not together.

Schuhmann: Yep, just takes a ball reversal to give Omri Casspi a lane to the basket.

Final: Clippers 137, Rockets 118

Barry: When Clips reach a point in the year when it looks easy for the collective unit to operate, they will have arrived. They are good but can be really good if they stay the course and find it.

Schuhmann: Yes, and they can’t just rely on their offensive firepower to get them through the season. I think that’s what the Knicks’ problem was last year. They were too good offensively for their own good.

I don’t know that Jordan/Griffin will ever be a reliable defensive frontline and I do know the Clips aren’t getting any D from their bench. Still, their offense is a thing of beauty. Looks like Paul/Griffin side pick-and-roll with Redick or Crawford coming off a pindown on the weak side is their go-to play.


Thoughts on Houston after tonight? Tough to evaluate when they get a stinker from Harden, but his defense probably isn’t going to get better.

Rockets pace & efficiency through Monday

On floor MIN Pace OffRtg DefRtg NetRtg +/-
Asik + Howard 47 92.2 87.1 100.1 -13.0 -18
Only Asik 47 104.4 115.0 92.3 +22.7 +23
Only Howard 83 99.9 116.1 104.0 +12.1 +13
One of the two 130 101.5 115.7 99.7 +16.0 +36

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Barry: You have to wonder what Asik can get you in the market (D-oriented stretch 4) if they feel they can play without a back-up. But they are a dangerous team that can keep pressure on you at any point in the game. Issue is if you don’t get intimidated, you can get back at them too.

If you have the “best” 2 and the “best” 5 you should be a home-court qualifying team for the playoffs.

Plus, no Patrick Beverley tonight. That adds something to their point pressure.

Clips’ Hopes Of Contending Depends On Defense Of Jordan, Griffin

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HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Los Angeles Clippers, a team that won 17 straight games and finished with the league’s fifth-best record last season, made some upgrades this summer in an effort to turn themselves into true title contenders.

On the bench, Vinny Del Negro was replaced by Doc Rivers. And in the starting lineup, Chauncey Billups and Caron Butler were replaced by J.J. Redick and Jared Dudley.

But if the Clippers are to compete for a championship this season, they will need improvement from within, specifically with starting big men Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan, who will need to make up for some lost defense on the bench.

L.A.’s bench delivered

One thing that gets overlooked in the Clippers’ rehaul is that they had an excellent second unit last season. Their starters were terrific, but they suffered little drop-off when they went to their bench.

Clippers efficiency, 2012-13

Lineups MIN Pace OffRtg DefRtg NetRtg +/-
*Starting lineups 982 91.9 112.8 103.4 +9.5 +181
Other lineups 2,960 94.2 106.0 100.2 +5.8 +348
Total 3,942 93.7 107.7 101.0 +6.7 +529

* Paul, Butler, Griffin, Jordan and either Billups or Green
Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

The Clippers’ starting unit was ridiculously good offensively, but slightly below average defensively. And though their bench struggled to score (it basically depended on Jamal Crawford‘s one-on-one ability), it still built on leads because it was so good on D.

In general, bench units are going to be better defensively than starting units because they’re going against other reserves. But the Clippers’ second most used lineup in the regular season, comprised of all reserves, was the third-best defensive unit in the league (minimum of 200 minutes played).

Three members of that unit are gone. Eric Bledsoe is in Phoenix, Ronny Turiaf is in Minnesota, and Lamar Odom is in NBA limbo as he deals with whatever off-court issues he has.

The importance of Odom

Here’s the thing about Odom last season. He was a disaster offensively (and was the season before that), but was a big part of the Clippers’ defensive improvement. L.A. went from 20th in defensive efficiency in 2011-12 to ninth last season. Their bench — particularly the big men — provided the strongest D.

In 821 minutes with Odom on the floor with either Turiaf or Ryan Hollins, the Clips allowed less than 91 points per 100 possessions. That’s elite defense no matter who the opponent is. No two-man combination in the league that played at least 450 minutes together had a lower on-court DefRtg than Odom and Turiaf.

On-court efficiency, Clippers big man combinations (min. 100 minutes)

Combination GP MIN OffRtg DefRtg NetRtg +/-
Griffin + Jordan 80 1,810 112.5 104.2 +8.3 +291
Griffin + Odom 66 502 105.7 97.9 +7.8 +114
Odom + Turiaf 53 479 100.0 91.0 +9.0 +56
Odom + Hollins 41 343 111.4 90.8 +20.6 +118
Odom + Jordan 34 166 99.3 104.6 -5.3 -16
Turiaf + Hollins 32 148 85.6 104.7 -19.1 -45
Griffin + Hollins 26 133 106.1 111.5 -5.4 -13

Why Jordan, Griffin must improve

The Clippers’ starting lineup — with Willie Green at the two — was one of the best offensive lineups in the league. Although Jordan can’t shoot at all and Griffin’s mid-range jumper still needs work, that unit scored at a rate better than the Heat’s No. 1 offense. No lineup that was on the floor for nearly as much time scored as efficiently, and great offense can make up for mediocre defense, especially in the regular season.

But there are reasons why Griffin and Jordan need to get better defensively …

1. In the postseason, it’s better to be a great defensive team than a great offensive team. Over the last 12 seasons, 23 of the 24 teams that have reached The Finals have ranked in the top 10 defensively and 15 of the 24 have ranked in the top five defensively. Only 17 of the 24 have ranked in the top 10 offensively and only eight of the 24 have ranked in the top five offensively.

2. Odom and Turiaf have been replaced by Antawn Jamison and Byron Mullens, two defensive liabilities (to put it lightly). The Clips’ bench won’t be nearly as good defensively as it was last season. If L.A. wants to remain in the top 10 on that end of the floor, the starters must make up for the drop-off.

3. The Clippers were just awful defensively in the playoffs, allowing the Grizzlies — who ranked 18th offensively in the regular season — to score almost 110 points per 100 possessions over six games. The only team that was worse defensively last postseason was the short-handed Lakers, who got trounced by San Antonio.

How Memphis exposed L.A.’s bigs

The problems in that series started with the Clippers’ inability to force turnovers and continued with their inability to keep the Grizzlies off the foul line.

Clippers defense, 2012-13

Season Opp2PT% Rank Opp3PT% Rank DREB% Rank OppTOV% Rank OppFTA Rate Rank
Reg. sea. 46.8% 6 37.3% 26 73.5% 15 17.2% 1 .306 29
Playoffs 48.5% 9 32.5% 5 73.3% 12 11.3% 15 .451 16

DREB% = Percentage of defensive rebounds obtained
OppTOV% = Opponent turnovers per 100 possessions
OppFTA Rate = Opponent FTA/FGA

Though it was a slow-paced series, the Grizzlies — a team not known for getting to the line — attempted over 34 free throws per game, 13 more than they averaged in the regular season. They shot better than 50 percent from the field in two of their wins, but 38 trips to the line in allowed them to be nearly as efficient in Game 3, when they shot just 39 percent.

All five L.A. bigs averaged at least six fouls per 48 minutes in the series, with Hollins and Turiaf totaling an incredible 24 fouls in just 96 minutes. Griffin fouled out of Game 1 and committed five fouls in Game 3. Jordan had three fouls in just 17 minutes in that same Game 3.

The combination of Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol is a tough matchup for any frontline. But the Clipper bigs got worked over, especially in the post …



Where Jordan and Griffin can improve

Griffin and Jordan aren’t terrible defenders. They both rank as “very good” on pick-and-rolls, according to Synergy Sports Technology. And when it came to rotations and team defense, Butler was a bigger liability in that starting lineup. L.A. was better defensively with Barnes at small forward with the other starters.

But the bigs aren’t great and their defensive focus and energy comes and goes. When guarding a big who faces up in the post, they often fail to contest his jumper or bite on his pump fake. And though they might contain an initial pick-and-roll, they don’t necessarily bring the second and third efforts needed against an offense that knows how to execute …


Both Odom and Turiaf ranked higher on pick-and-roll D and on post defense, where Griffin and Jordan rated as just “good” by Synergy in the regular season … and “poor” in the playoffs. The Grizzlies scored 69 points on 61 post-ups against the pair over the six games.

Overall, the Griffin-Jordan combo just didn’t measure up defensively to the big man pairings on other Western Conference contenders …

On-court efficiency, starting bigs, West playoff teams

Combination (Team) GP MIN OffRtg DefRtg NetRtg +/-
Duncan + Splitter (SAS) 60 819 106.0 92.7 +13.3 +208
Randolph + Gasol (MEM) 74 1,923 102.6 95.5 +7.1 +322
Ibaka + Perkins (OKC) 76 1,721 109.8 98.0 +11.8 +349
Faried + Koufos (DEN) 79 1,235 106.7 101.9 +4.8 +126
Bogut + Lee (GSW) 31 720 106.7 103.0 +3.7 +50
Griffin + Jordan (LAC) 80 1,810 112.5 104.2 +8.3 +291
Gasol + Howard (LAL) 46 994 103.5 104.2 -0.7 -19
Patterson + Asik (HOU) 46 797 108.3 104.8 +3.6 +78

The Clippers will again be competing with the Spurs, Thunder and Grizzlies, three teams with bigs they can count on defensively. The Rockets have (a healthier) Dwight Howard and the Warriors could have a healthy Andrew Bogut.

Rivers was the coach of the league’s best defensive team of the last six seasons, and this team will likely be the best offensive one he’s ever led. But he’s not bringing Kevin Garnett with him from Boston.

The tools are there for Griffin and Jordan to improve. They have as much athleticism and mobility as any frontline in the league. But it takes a lot more than that to be an elite defender.

Jordan spoke about being a better communicator earlier this summer, and that’s a step in the right direction. But discipline, focus and sustained effort must also be priorities.

The Clips don’t need either guy to turn into Garnett. But if they’re to be included as one of the West teams that could be in The Finals next June, their starting bigs need to go from good to great defensively … especially since they won’t have as much help from their back-ups.

Who’s Left? A Look At The Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – It’s been 15 days since teams could start talking to free agents and six days since contracts could be signed. And at this point, pickings are slim. If you want an impact player, you’re probably going to have to settle for a guy that makes an impact only some of the time.

Here’s what’s left on the free-agent market as of Tuesday morning, according to the numbers guys put up last season.

There were 30 free agents available on July 1 (or who became available afterward) who had played at least 2,000 minutes last season. Only three remain …

Most minutes played, remaining free agents

Player Old team GP GS MIN MIN/G
Brandon Jennings MIL (R) 80 80 2,896 36.2
Gerald Henderson CHA (R) 68 58 2,133 31.4
Nate Robinson CHI 82 23 2,086 25.4
Nikola Pekovic MIN (R) 62 62 1,959 31.6
Jason Maxiell DET 72 71 1,789 24.8
Antawn Jamison LAL 76 6 1,636 21.5
Lamar Odom LAC 82 2 1,616 19.7
Alan Anderson TOR 65 2 1,495 23.0
Gary Neal SAS 68 17 1,484 21.8
Beno Udrih ORL 66 9 1,457 22.1

(R) = Restricted free agent

There were 21 free agents who played at least 200 minutes in the playoffs, and six of those guys are still left …

Most playoff minutes played, remaining free agents

Player Old team GP GS MIN MIN/G
Nate Robinson CHI 12 8 404 33.7
Gary Neal SAS 21 0 390 18.6
D.J. Augustin IND 19 1 316 16.6
Derek Fisher OKC 11 0 261 23.7
Kenyon Martin NYK 12 1 253 21.1
Devin Harris ATL 6 6 225 37.5
Brandon Jennings MIL (R) 4 4 133 33.3
Sam Young IND 15 0 130 8.7
Keyon Dooling MEM 14 0 114 8.1
Ivan Johnson ATL 6 0 108 18.0

There were 31 free agents who scored at least 800 points last season, some more efficiently than others. Only four of those guys are left …

Most points scored, remaining free agents

Player Old team GP PTS PPG eFG% TS%
Brandon Jennings MIL (R) 80 1,397 17.5 46.8% 51.0%
Nate Robinson CHI 82 1,074 13.1 51.0% 54.0%
Gerald Henderson CHA (R) 68 1,055 15.5 46.6% 53.1%
Nikola Pekovic MIN (R) 62 1,011 16.3 52.0% 57.2%
Antawn Jamison LAL 76 712 9.4 53.7% 56.1%
Alan Anderson TOR 65 693 10.7 46.0% 50.9%
Gary Neal SAS 68 645 9.5 48.7% 51.2%
Mo Williams UTA 46 592 12.9 48.5% 51.9%
Devin Harris ATL 58 577 9.9 52.5% 56.5%
Byron Mullens CHA 53 564 10.6 44.4% 46.5%

EFG% = (FGM + (0.5*3PM)) / FGA
TS% = PTS / (2 * (FGA + (0.44*FTA)))

Of the 30 free agents who grabbed at least 300 rebounds, five remain …

Most total rebounds, remaining free agents

Player Old Team GP OREB DREB REB RPG OREB% DREB% REB%
Nikola Pekovic MIN (R) 62 230 315 545 8.8 13.1% 18.8% 15.9%
Lamar Odom LAC 82 117 363 480 5.9 8.6% 25.2% 17.2%
Jason Maxiell DET 72 135 274 409 5.7 8.6% 17.7% 13.2%
Antawn Jamison LAL 76 109 253 362 4.8 7.5% 16.7% 12.2%
Byron Mullens CHA 53 71 266 337 6.4 5.3% 21.9% 13.2%
Samuel Dalembert MIL 47 105 171 276 5.9 13.9% 26.6% 19.8%
Ivan Johnson ATL 69 76 190 266 3.9 8.4% 20.9% 14.7%
Brandan Wright DAL 64 85 175 260 4.1 8.5% 16.0% 12.4%
Gerald Henderson CHA (R) 68 55 195 250 3.7 2.9% 10.9% 6.8%
Brandon Jennings MIL (R) 80 59 187 246 3.1 2.1% 7.3% 4.6%

OREB% = Percentage of available offensive rebounds grabbed while on the floor
DREB% = Percentage of available defensive rebounds grabbed while on the floor
REB% = Percentage of available total rebounds grabbed while on the floor

Of the 24 free agents who dished out at least 200 assists last season, six remain …

Most assists, remaining free agents

Player Old Team GP AST APG TO AST/TO ASTRatio
Brandon Jennings MIL (R) 80 521 6.5 203 2.57 24.9
Nate Robinson CHI 82 358 4.4 144 2.49 23.9
Beno Udrih ORL 66 302 4.6 108 2.80 32.4
Jamaal Tinsley UTA 66 290 4.4 106 2.74 45.2
Mo Williams UTA 46 285 6.2 125 2.28 29.1
A.J. Price WAS 57 205 3.6 64 3.20 28.9
Devin Harris ATL 58 197 3.4 88 2.24 24.8
Gerald Henderson CHA (R) 68 177 2.6 108 1.64 13.9
D.J. Augustin IND 76 170 2.2 68 2.50 29.5
Luke Walton CLE 50 166 3.3 60 2.77 39.9

ASTRatio = Percentage of possessions resulting in an assist

There were 49 free agents who recorded a positive plus-minus last season, and 18 of them – including a pair who made a strong impact – remain.

Highest plus-minus, remaining free agents

Player Old Team GP +/- OffRtg DefRtg NetRtg
Lamar Odom LAC 82 +296 104.9 95.4 +9.5
Devin Harris ATL 58 +155 105.2 97.9 +7.3
Gary Neal SAS 68 +101 105.4 101.4 +4.0
Brandan Wright DAL 64 +100 107.9 102.8 +5.1
Derek Fisher OKC 33 +64 107.2 100.7 +6.5
Kenyon Martin NYK 18 +58 109.8 101.4 +8.4
Rodrigue Beaubois DAL 45 +36 102.8 99.3 +3.5
Nate Robinson CHI 82 +32 101.9 101.9 +0.0
Mike James DAL 45 +30 106.8 103.8 +3.0
Jerry Stackhouse BKN 37 +27 103.0 104.6 -1.7

OffRtg = Team points scored per 100 possessions with player on floor
DefRtg = Team points allowed per 100 possessions with player on floor
NetRtg = Team point differential per 100 possessions with player on floor

Bobcats Pay Up To Nab Jefferson

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From NBA.com staff reports

In a potentially perception-altering move for one of the NBA’s most moribund franchises, the Charlotte Bobcats reached a verbal agreement Wednesday with one of the most sought-after big men after Dwight Howard, Utah’s Al Jefferson, who agreed to a three-year, $40.5 million deal.

The 28-year-old Jefferson was Charlotte’s top priority in free agency, as the Bobcats sought to finally find a low-post presence that would help their perimeter players get move driving and shooting space.

Jefferson will receive $13.5 million in each of the three seasons of the contract. He will have a player option for the third season.

The Bobcats, according to a source, will amnesty forward Tyrus Thomas in order to create enough cap room to sign Jefferson, who will, along with first-round pick Cody Zeller, give Charlotte a bolstered frontcourt next season, along with second-year small forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist.

Last season, Byron Mullens (when healthy) was the de facto starting center for Charlotte, notching 41 starts in 53 games played. But the Bobcats also gave playing time in the middle to second-year big man Bismack Biyombo as well as veterans Thomas, Brendan Haywood, DeSagana Diop and Josh McRoberts.

The Bobcats are finally free of Diop, a monumental bust who played in just 92 games over the past four seasons after Charlotte took him off the Dallas’ Mavericks’ hands, and they did not make a qualifying offer to Mullens, setting the forward-center free.

Haywood and Biyombo, who started 65 games last year and will enter his third season, are both on the books at bargain rates for next season. Charlotte signed Haywood before last season after Dallas used the amnesty clause to release him. He’ll be paid $2.05 million by the Bobcats next season. McRoberts is an unrestricted free agent.

The 6-foot-10, 289-pound Jefferson is a low-post tactician on the offensive end, but he certainly is no Bill Russell on the defensive end. He averaged 17.8 ppg, 9.2 rpg and 1.1 bpg last season with the Jazz.

Acquired by Utah from Minnesota in a July, 2010 trade, Jefferson could be the kind of acquisition for Charlotte that Vlade Divac was for Sacramento in 1998, when he left the Charlotte Hornets for the Kings in a free agent deal. With Divac aboard and Chris Webber coming from Washington, the Kings turned their up-to-then terrible fortunes around, becoming one of the league’s most exciting teams.

Charlotte has a way to go to get to that level, but Jefferson’s presence will make things easier for everyone. Averaging 16.4 ppg over nine NBA seasons, Jefferson has never shot less than 49.2 percent from the floor. He offers a creative low-post game that utilizes both hands along with an improved jumper.

Now with four centers on the roster for next season, it will be interesting to see Bobcats owner Michael Jordan’s next move is in a possible attempt to thin out the position and seek help elsewhere for the club.

Jordan has been criticized for poor drafts and seeming unwillingness in recent years to spend money, but in signing Jefferson and eating the final two years and $18 million of Thomas’s contract, Jordan is making a significant investment in trying to turn around the Bobcats’ fortunes. They’ve been the worst team in the league the last two years, with a combined 28-120 record, including a 7-59 season in the Lottery-shortened 2011-12 campaign.

Jefferson averaged 17.8 points and 9.2 rebounds last season for the Jazz, who could also lose their other free agent big man, Paul Millsap. The two sides met in the opening minutes of free agency on Monday but Utah did not make an offer to Millsap.

NBA.com’s Jeff Caplan and TNT analyst David Aldridge contributed to this report

2013 Free Agents: The Numbers

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HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – At 12:01 a.m. ET on Monday, 144 free agents became available. While there are some big names at the top of the list, it’s not the deepest free-agent class we’ve seen.

Only two 2013 All-Stars — Chris Paul and Dwight Howard — are on the market. Only 19 of the 144 free agents scored at least 1,000 points last season, and only 11 started at least 50 games for a playoff team. One of those 11, of course, was Paul, who took himself off the market pretty quickly.

Two of the other 10 — Monta Ellis and Brandon Jennings — started for the 38-44 Milwaukee Bucks. Jennings was a minus-289 last season. The other eight: Howard, Tony Allen, Andre Iguodala, Kyle Korver, Josh Smith, Tiago Splitter, Jeff Teague and David West.

Jennings’ minus-289 was not the worst mark of available free agents. That belongs to Byron Mullens, who was a minus-419 (in only 1,428 minutes) for the Bobcats last season. Mullens’ teammate Gerald Henderson was a minus-402.

The Bobcats were pretty awful whether or not Henderson was on the floor. The Bucks were pretty good (+6.9 points per 100 possessions) with Jennings on the bench and pretty bad (-4.4) with him in the game. His on-off-court differential of 11.2 points per 100 possessions was the worst among free agents who played at least 1,000 minutes with a single team last season.

Worst on-off-court NetRtg differential among free agents

Player Min. On NetRtg On NetRtg Off Diff.
Brandon Jennings 2,896 -4.4 +6.9 -11.2
D.J. Augustin 1,226 -1.1 +7.8 -8.9
Byron Mullens 1,428 -16.2 -7.4 -8.8
Tyler Hansbrough 1,366 -0.6 +8.0 -8.6
Al Jefferson 2,578 -3.5 +4.3 -7.8

Minimum 1,000 minutes with a single team
NetRtg = Team point differential per 100 possessions

On the opposite end of the spectrum was Devin Harris, whose Hawks were 10.0 points per 100 possessions better when he was on the floor than when he was on the bench.

Best on-off-court NetRtg differential among free agents

Player Min. On NetRtg On NetRtg Off Diff.
Devin Harris 1,421 +7.3 -2.7 +10.0
David West 2,435 +8.5 -0.9 +9.4
DeMarre Carroll 1,111 +5.4 -3.1 +8.4
Kyle Korver 2,259 +4.4 -3.7 +8.0
Brandan Wright 1,149 +5.1 -2.6 +7.7

Minimum 1,000 minutes with a single team

It shouldn’t be any surprise that, on offense, Paul was the biggest difference maker of the 145 free agents …

Best on-off-court OffRtg differential among free agents

Player Min. On OffRtg On OffRtg Off Diff.
Chris Paul 2,335 112.1 101.3 +10.8
David West 2,435 104.9 96.1 +8.8
J.J. Redick (ORL) 1,575 103.7 95.3 +8.4
Kyle Korver 2,259 105.7 98.8 +6.8
Roger Mason Jr. 1,218 107.2 100.6 +6.6

Minimum 1,000 minutes
OffRtg = Team points scored per 100 possessions

And it’s no surprise that the Lakers were much better defensively with Howard on the floor, or that the Grizzlies got more stops with Tony Allen in the game. Lamar Odom‘s DefRtg differential, combined with Paul topping the list above, makes it clear that the Clippers were an offensive team with their starters in the game and a defensive unit when they went to their bench.

Best on-off-court DefRtg differential among free agents

Player Min. On DefRtg On DefRtg Off Diff.
Lamar Odom 1,616 95.4 104.9 -9.5
Tony Allen 2,109 94.3 101.1 -6.8
Tiago Splitter 1,997 96.1 102.3 -6.3
Devin Harris 1,421 97.9 104.1 -6.2
Dwight Howard 2,722 101.7 107.8 -6.0

Minimum 1,000 minutes with a single team
DefRtg = Team points allowed per 100 possessions

Redick was a big difference maker on offense with Orlando, in part, because he shot 39 percent from 3-point range and helped spread the floor. But he shot just 32 percent from beyond the arc after being traded to Milwaukee and isn’t among the top 10 3-point shooters among free agents…

Highest 3-point percentage among free agents

Player 3PM 3PA 3PT% 3PA%
Jose Calderon 130 282 46.1% 44.4%
Kyle Korver 189 414 45.7% 68.9%
Mike Dunleavy 128 299 42.8% 47.9%
Kevin Martin 158 371 42.6% 47.7%
Martell Webster 139 329 42.2% 51.7%
Chris Copeland 59 140 42.1% 36.8%
Roger Mason Jr. 66 159 41.5% 52.1%
C.J. Watson 88 214 41.1% 46.6%
Randy Foye 178 434 41.0% 58.8%
O.J. Mayo 142 349 40.7% 34.0%

Minimum 100 3PA
3PA% = 3PA/FGA

Howard ranked second among free agents in rebounding percentage, only topped by J.J. Hickson

Highest REB% among free agents

Player MIN OREB% DREB% REB%
J.J. Hickson 2,323 13.1% 28.0% 20.5%
Dwight Howard 2,722 10.6% 27.5% 19.3%
Zaza Pachulia 1,134 13.9% 21.5% 17.7%
Marreese Speights 1,300 12.6% 22.8% 17.4%
Lamar Odom 1,616 8.6% 25.2% 17.2%

Minimum 1,000 minutes
OREB% = Percentage of available offensive rebounds grabbed
DREB% = Percentage of available defensive rebounds grabbed
REB% = Percentage of available total rebounds grabbed

There are a good amount of distributors on the market, including a couple of guys who had more assists than field goal attempts last season…

Highest ASTRatio among free agents

Player MIN FGA AST TO ASTRatio TORatio
Jamaal Tinsley 1,221 234 290 106 45.2 16.53
Pablo Prigioni 1,263 220 236 86 42.7 15.55
Jose Calderon 2,159 635 518 126 39.4 9.59
Chris Paul 2,335 856 678 159 36.9 8.66
Beno Udrih 1,457 476 302 108 32.4 11.60

Minimum 1,000 minutes
ASTRatio = Percentage of possessions ending in an assist
TORatio = Percentage of possessions ending in an turnover

Paul doesn’t only dish dimes, but he’s pretty good at getting himself to the free throw line, ranking fourth among non-big (PG, SG, SF) free agents in free throw rate…

Highest FTA Rate among non-big free agents

Player FGA FTM FTA FT% FTA Rate
Andrei Kirilenko 560 188 250 75.2% .446
Manu Ginobili 539 164 206 79.6% .382
Darren Collison 724 242 275 88.0% .380
Chris Paul 856 286 323 88.5% .377
Gerald Henderson 855 258 313 82.4% .366

Minimum 500 FGA
FTA Rate = FTA/FGA

Who’s Sitting On A Hot Seat Now?


HANG TIME, Texas — Every time a bell rings an angel gets his wings.

In the NBA that familiar line from the holiday classic “It’s A Wonderful Life” has a different twist.

Every time the bell rings a head coach gets his walking papers and a handful of others start looking over their shoulders.

It’s a tenuous life.

Of course, this season has already been quite unusual with Mike Brown fired by the Lakers after just five games. But now that the schedule has reached the one-third mark and claimed Avery Johnson, it’s time to look at some others down around the bottom of the standings.

Randy Wittman, Wizards (3-23) – No, he hasn’t had John Wall all season. Yes, he’s had to play at times without Nene and Trevor Ariza and Bradley Beal. But the Wizards are the only group in Washington that makes Congress look competent by comparison. After a recent 100-68 thumping by the almost-as-hapless Pistons, even Wittman seemed to have enough. “That was an embarrassment, and I apologize to our ownership and to our fans,” he said. “I especially apologize to anyone who watched that entire game. I would have turned it off after the first five minutes.” It would seem to be a matter of when, not if.

Monty Williams, Hornets (6-22) – It’s hard to see the Hornets turning right around and cutting Williams loose just months after giving him a four-year contract extension. There has been the matter of Eric Gordon’s injury and the fact that No. 1 draft pick Anthony Davis was on the shelf for 13 games. But there are rumblings in New Orleans about his constantly changing rotations and collapse of his defense, which ranks 29th.

Byron Scott, Cavaliers (7-23)
— The Cavs are likely headed to their third straight trip to the lottery under Scott, but that doesn’t mean that he’s headed to the exit. The key to his previous success at New Jersey and New Orleans was having a top-notch point guard and Scott has an excellent relationship with maybe the next great thing in Kyrie Irving. This was always a long, heavy lift from the moment LeBron James bolted and that has not changed.

Mike Dunlap, Bobcats (7-21)
– What a difference a month makes. After beating the Wizards on Nov. 24, the Bobcats were 7-5, had matched their win total from last season and their rookie coach was getting praised. Now 16 straight losses later, Dunlap is preaching patience with his young core of Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Kemba Walker, Byron Mullens and Jeffery Taylor. He has earned that. A dozen of Charlotte’s 21 losses have come by 10 points or less, a dramatic change from the historically horrible last season when the Bobcats were rolled in one-third of their games by 20 points or more.

Lawrence Frank, Pistons (9-22)
— Frank insists that his Pistons are a better team than they were a year ago. The record — identical then and now — does not back that up. He says that his club now is more competitive, but just doesn’t know how to finish games. Some of the players have grumbled that there is also a failure of coach to make the right calls and adjustments when games get late. When push comes to shove, it’s the coach that gets nudged out the door.

Dwane Casey, Raptors (9-20)– Another one of those seasons when the Raptors were supposed to turn things around and make a push for the playoffs in the lesser Eastern Conference has gone south. Injuries to Andrea Bargnani, Kyle Lowry and Linas Kleiza. Amir Johnson gets suspended for throwing his mouthguard at a referee. G.M. Bryan Colangelo says the talent is there, but the Raptors lack focus and attention to detail. The Raps’ offense is mediocre (ranked 17th) and their defense just bad (27th). Even in Canada during the winter, that all puts Casey on thin ice.

Keith Smart, Kings (9-19) – Smart got the job to replace Paul Westphal specifically because of what was perceived as an ability to work with the mercurial DeMarcus Cousins. So he turned Cousins loose last season, let him do just about anything he pleased and got enough results to earn a contract extension. Now that Cousins has abused his free-rein relationship with his coach and another season is sinking fast, it would be easy to just blame Smart, which the Kings eventually will do. But this is a bad team with a knucklehead as its centerpiece and ownership that can’t tell you where they’ll be playing in two years.

Alvin Gentry, Suns (11-18) — It was at the end of a seven-game losing streak when Suns owner Robert Sarver told ESPN.com that Gentry’s job was safe. “We’ve got confidence in our coaching staff and we’re not considering making changes,” he said. Of course, that usually means start packing your bags. It was all about starting over in this first season post-Nash in the desert. He’s changed lineups more than his ties and the result is usually the same. Gentry is a good bet to last out the season, but it’s probably going to take a big finishing kick to return next year.

Camp Questions: Will The Bobcats Put Up Fewer Mid-range Jumpers?


HANG TIME NEW JERSEY –
The Charlotte Bobcats have nowhere to go but up. Last season, they finished with the worst record in NBA history and ranked last in both offensive and defensive efficiency.

While they added No. 2 pick Michael Kidd-Gilchrist this summer, the Bobcats didn’t exactly upgrade their roster in a major way. But they did hire a new coach, who could make a difference, despite the fact that you’d probably never heard of him before he was hired in June.

Mike Dunlap is a numbers guy, which automatically makes him a favorite in this space. And as a numbers guy, he knows that his team had the league’s worst shot selection last year.

The Bobcats took 39.6 percent of their shots from mid-range (between the paint and the 3-point line), the highest rate in the league. Furthermore, only 16.3 percent of their 3-point attempts came from the corner, the lowest rate in the league. Combine those two numbers and you’ve got a pretty good formula for a pretty bad offense, no matter how much talent you may or may not have on your roster.

Highest percentage of shots from mid-range, 2011-12

Team FGM FGA FG% %FGA
Charlotte 768 2,098 36.6% 39.6%
Boston 824 1,953 42.2% 38.4%
Philadelphia 839 2,096 40.0% 38.0%
Toronto 681 1,849 36.8% 35.9%
New Orleans 714 1,790 39.9% 35.1%

%FGA = Percentage of total field goal attempts

So Dunlap is trying to change things. (more…)

Shaqtin’ A Fool: Episode 2


Shaq takes a tour around the NBA for the latest in the bizarre, weird and well, foolish plays of the past week. From some questionable dunking choices by JaVale McGee and Rudy Gay, to Metta World Peace‘s not-so-peaceful play to Byron Mullens‘ nose-picking and the continued adventures of Dwight Howards and Big Baby, vote for your favorite Shaqtin’ A Fool moment!

Lob City No. 1 In Alley-Oops? Think Again

Lob City. Lob Angeles. We get it. It’s the all-above-the-rim, all-the-time excitement about the Los Angeles Clippers, driven by consummate point guard Chris Paul and eminent throwdown finishers Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan.

But the No. 1 alley-oopingest team through Wednesday’s schedule plays on the opposite coast, in a town and building whose basketball traditions have been a lot less gaudy and a lot more fundamental. Back in the day, anyway.

The New York Knicks have the most successful alley-oop dunk plays with 20. Center Tyson Chandler tops all individuals with 12, according to my anonymous stats guru/compiler.

The Clippers and their Staples Center roomies, the Lakers, are tied for second with 18 such plays. Miami (15), Washington (13), Minnesota (12) and Atlanta and Portland (10 each) line up after that.

(more…)

Rick’s Tips: Changing Fortunes




Welcome to this week’s tips on MLK Day. Hope everybody is happy, safe, and at least a little reflective, while watching wave after wave of NBA action.

Time to hit the waiver wire, as we continue our relentless pursuit of the diamonds in the rough that change fantasy fortunes …

Shane Battier

With Dwyane Wade on the shelf due to a sprained ankle he called the worst he’s ever had, and with reports saying there is no timetable for his return, it may be time to take a long look at Shane Battier.

When Battier gets starter’s minutes, he typically hovers around double digits with two threes, a block, and a steal. He’s averaging 0.8 in each of those categories in just 22.4 minutes per game, so that tells me the fantasy gold will be there if he’s playing 28+ minutes.

I hope Wade can return yesterday, but with “caution” emerging as a major theme this season, it’s safe to assume he will miss some time — especially when you consider the additional foot injury that robbed him of playing time last week.

Byron Mullens

The artist formerly known as B.J. won’t block many shots for you, but a center who averages double figures is a commodity in most fantasy hoops formats.

Over the past four games, Mullens has dropped 15-21-18-20 with an average of seven boards. Only one block over that stretch is a bit of a buzzkill, but Mullens is a very good offensive center, shooting 49 percent from the field and 94 percent from the free throw line this season.

Mullens is vying to be the center of the future in Charlotte and he will get as much run as he can handle from here on out. If you already snatched him off waivers, enjoy the O and hope for more D.

Kawhi Leonard

The fantasy values of Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Richard Jefferson are obviously up since Manu Ginobili went down, but Leonard may be the biggest fantasy beneficiary simply because he wasn’t fantasy relevant before Manu’s injury.

In case you haven’t seen Kawhi play yet, this dude can go!

Leonard has reached double figures in each of the last five games because he’s averaging 34.6 minutes and shooting the lights out (57-50-71). Best of all, he’s a block-steal guy as well, averaging 1.8 steals and 0.8 blocks over that stretch.

The Spurs love Leonard, who has been praised for his work ethic. Personally, I loved this trade on draft night because the Spurs needed to find their next shutdown swingman, a la Bruce Bowen. The fact that they traded a “Pop guy” like George Hill for Leonard should tell you all you need to know.

Mehmet Okur

When Okur missed games recently, most of the fantasy world turned its back on this former All-Star, who was dropped in both of my 12-team leagues. But I still think there’s decent value with Okur because you can count the number of true centers who bang threes on one hand.

After missing two games with a back injury, Okur had returned for three games heading into Monday’s tilt with the Clippers. In the past two games, Okur has averaged 35 minutes, 10 points, seven rebounds, one steal, and one block. The deep ball isn’t all the way there yet, as Okur made one-of-10 threes in the last two games, but you gotta love all those attempts.

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