Posts Tagged ‘Brent Barry’

Morning Shootaround — Sept. 11

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Next up for HOF consideration | LeBron continues Hollywood expansion | Brooks sees no chemistry issues for Wizards

No. 1: Next up for HOF consideration? — Now that the star-studded Hall of Fame class of 2016 has been praised and inducted, it’s time to look forward to next year’s candidates. Our Scott Howard-Cooper takes a look at the candidates most likely to make the list for 2017 … a group that could include Kevin Johnson, Tim Hardaway and Chris Webber:

No vote-sucking automatics of the O’Neal-Iverson-Kidd variety are coming up for nomination in fall/winter this year among players with strong NBA or ABA ties, before the field is narrowed to finalists prior to All-Star Weekend in New Orleans and a second round of voting takes place in time to announce the winners during the Final Four in Glendale, Ariz. There is the interesting case for Ben Wallace, but he is the closest to anyone big-footing their way on the ballot, the way 2016 included O’Neal, Iverson and Izzo as three obvious calls and the 2018 headliners will arrive with hefty credentials. Even George McGinnis’ new status breaks right for the carryovers, with McGinnis moving from the North American group, the committee that includes Johnson, Hardaway and Webber, to the veterans. That makes one less candidate in North America to draw support away, not to mention that the possible benefit for McGinnis of only needing one round of voting in for enshrinement in his new category.

While the timing issues would be relevant any year, they are especially important this time as three ex-players search for reason to hope after the letdown of the recent election cycles. If Hardaway, Johnson and Webber can’t get traction when Wallace may be the biggest newcomer, after all, depending which college and NBA coaches go on the ballot for the first time, it does not say much for their chances when several marquee names are added for 2018.

Johnson needs a push after reaching the finalist stage this year, again, but failing to receive the necessary support, again. He is the lone NBA player who reached the second round of voting in 2016 without getting elected, along with college coaches Lefty Driesell, Bo Ryan and Eddie Sutton.

Hardaway, meanwhile, is going backward, from previously making finalist to being cut in the initial balloting in ’16 and not even making it to All-Star Weekend despite making five All-NBA teams and five All-Star games in a career that included five seasons averaging at least 20 points and three seasons with double-digit assists.

Webber is in the deepest hole of all: two years on the ballot, two years of not making it past the first round, after 20.7 points, 9.8 rebounds, five All-Star games and five All-NBA spots. Not making it just to finalist in 2017 would be the most-damning statement of all, and it might be anyway, no matter how many coaches are potentially drawing votes away.

There could also be newcomers who have been eligible but have yet to be nominated — Penny Hardaway, Brent Barry, Bruce Bowen, Robert Horry — but none would seem to have the same case as Wallace, the former center best known for patrolling the inside for the Pistons. And there is a case.

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Morning Shootaround — April 10


VIDEO: The Fast Break — April 9

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Spurs trying to solve Curry and vice versa | Rockets’ brass will be evaluated at season’s end | What can Bryan Colangelo bring to Philly? | Should losing teams rest players?

No. 1: Spurs trying to solve Curry and vice versa After three games this season, and with another showdown looming Sunday, it’s clear the Spurs have targeted Steph Curry as the player they must stop. That’s not exactly breaking news; Curry is the league’s leading scorer and the heavy favorite to win his second straight MVP. But the Spurs bring one of the league’s top defenses and can throw multiple bodies in Curry’s direction, starting with Tony Parker and Patty Mills and at times they might surprise Curry with Kawhi Leonard.  Curry spoke about the Spurs on the eve of the final meeting between the teams before the playoffs with Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle

Stephen Curry thinks he figured out something in Thursday’s meeting with the Spurs, and he’ll get a chance to test his theory when the Warriors play at San Antonio on Sunday.

After scoring 14 points on season lows in field-goal (4-for-18, 22.2 percent) and three-point (1-for-12, 8.3 percent) shooting in the Warriors’ 87-79 loss to the Spurs, the Warriors’ point guard bounced back with 29 points on 11-of-19 shooting from the floor in Thursday’s 112-101 win.

“I just watched the film and made adjustments based on how they played me in San Antonio and how I thought they’d probably continue,” Curry said before Saturday’s game against the Grizzlies. “Instead of searching for the three, I was trying to keep them off-balance by getting into the paint and making plays.

“I just slowed down, really. Any game where somebody makes crazy adjustments like that, you’ve got to be able to take your time and figure out how you’re going to attack that space. I didn’t do it well in San Antonio, but I made the proper adjustments last game.”

Curry is averaging 11.1 three-point attempts per game, but with the Spurs switching on pick-and-rolls and running him off the three-point line, Curry made a concerted effort to get into the lane.

He attempted only seven three-pointers Thursday, and two were prayers at the end of quarters. It was the eighth time all season that Curry attempted seven or fewer three-pointers.

“I think teams have mimicked what the Spurs did the last time we played them in San Antonio,” Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said. “Teams really started jumping out at him and switching, so we’re seeing it more and more. They definitely have a plan, and they’re good at it. They’re obviously smart. To do something like that, you have continuity, understanding and togetherness, and they’re really good at it.”

Curry has gotten pretty good at handling it, too.

That’s one of the reasons that the entire basketball world will be tuned into Sunday’s game.

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No. 2: Rockets’ brass will be evaluated at season’s end With the Rockets qualifying as the heavy favorite to win the season’s most disappointing team award, are big changes coming? That question wouldn’t even be asked right around this time last season, when the Rockets were one route to an appearance in the Western Conference finals. But this season has been all sorts of hell, starting with the early firing of coach Kevin McHale and the failure to incorporate Ty Lawson into the lineup. It would be big news if Daryl Morey loses the GM job if only because Morey has a reputable track record. Anyway, owner Leslie Alexander must decide the fate of Morey and also interim coach JB Bickerstaff. Here is Calvin Watkins of ESPN.com …

Sources told ESPN that the Rockets believe every aspect of the organization — coaching staff, front office and, of course, their roster — must be subject to a thorough review in the wake of Houston’s slide to a 38-41 outfit that’s at serious risk to miss the playoffs after damaging losses this week to Dallas and Phoenix.

Houston won 56 games and reached the Western Conference finals last season.

Rockets owner Leslie Alexander has publicly acknowledged that Bickerstaff — who replaced Kevin McHale in an interim role just 11 games into this season — would have to be assessed at season’s end.

Significant roster changes are likewise expected, with free agent-to-be Dwight Howard widely anticipated to move elsewhere and little certain beyond the Rockets’ presumed intention to reload around star guard James Harden.

Sources say Morey, whose contract runs through the 2017-18 season, ‎also faces some uncertainty in the wake of the Rockets’ struggles. Morey’s ever-bold approach to roster assembly won deserved kudos for bringing Harden (October 2012) and Howard (July 2013) to Houston in quick succession, but team chemistry has been a rising concern this season given the well-chronicled deterioration of the Harden-Howard relationship and the failed offseason gamble on guard Ty Lawson.

“You’re asking the wrong guy about that,” Morey told ESPN in a recent interview when asked about his job security. “That’s Mr. Alexander’s choice and all I do is my job every day. He makes that call.”

After a 4-7 start, Houston made the stunning decision to part ways with McHale, who had barely begun the first year of a new three-year extension.

Bickerstaff has fared better, going 34-34 in his interim role, but Houston’s defensive frailties and repeated inability to hold big leads have conspired to put the Rockets on par with the Chicago Bulls on the list of this season’s most disappointing teams.

Bickerstaff, for his part, says he has not yet commenced discussions with management about his job status.

“No, not at all, that’s not even a issue [or] a concern,” Bickerstaff said of his future prior to the Rockets’ loss to the Suns on Thursday night.‎

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No. 3: What can Bryan Colangelo bring to Philly? The Sixers haven’t officially named Bryan Colangelo as the successor to Sam Hinkie, who resigned last week, although it could happen by Monday. But that hasn’t stopped Philly from wondering if the team of Colangelo and Colangelo — no, not a law firm, but the father-son front office combo of Jerry and Bryan — can produce a somewhat drastic turnaround for the rebuilding team. Here is Keith Pompey of the Philadelphia Inquirer on the possibilities …

Folks bashed the Sixers for nepotism, immediately after learning it would be Bryan Colangelo. They brought up that he was unable to win an NBA championship during his stops as general manager of the Phoenix Suns and the Toronto Raptors.

And they delivered perhaps the lowest blow of all, mentioning that he drafted 20-year-old Italian Andrea Bargnani with the first overall selection in the 2006 NBA draft. Let’s just say making Bargnani the first European to be selected first overall didn’t pan out. He never lived up to the hype surrounding that pick and is on his third NBA team.

But what the disappointed folks don’t mention is that Bryan Colangelo is a two-time NBA executive of the year. The 50-year-old first won the award in 2005 with the Suns. His second award came in 2007 with the Raptors.

“If you are the Sixers, you should be really happy about this,” said a league executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity. “Plus it will be a seamless transition with Jerry and his son. Everything will be on the same page.”
That wasn’t the case with Jerry Colangelo and Hinkie over the last four months.

But aside from Bargnani, Bryan Colangelo has been known for excelling while making aggressive moves.

He drafted Steve Nash 15th overall in the 1996 NBA draft and traded him to the Dallas Mavericks in 1998 in exchange for Pat Garrity, Martin Muursepp, Bubba Wells, and a 1999 first-round pick that he used to select Shawn Marion.

He also drafted Amar’e Stoudemire ninth overall in the 2002 draft.

Some of his most noteworthy roster moves came during and after the 2003-04 season, when the team finished, 29-53.

In January 2004, he sent Anfernee Hardaway, Stephon Marbury, and Cezary Trybanski to the Knicks for Howard Eisley, Maciej Lampe, Antonio McDyess, Charlie Ward, Milos Vujanic, and 2004 and 2010 first-round picks. Then he signed Nash as a free agent that summer.

The following season, the Suns went 62-20 and lost to the Spurs in the Western Conference finals. Nash was named the league’s MVP, and Mike D’Antoni, now the Sixers’ associate head coach, was the NBA coach of the year.

That was the first of three Pacific Division titles and the first of back-to-back conference finals appearances for the Suns.

However, Bryan Colangelo wasn’t there to celebrate all that put in place due to a soured relationship with managing owner Robert Sarver, who bought the team from Jerry Colangelo.

So he took over the Raptors’ on Feb. 28, 2006. In 2006-07, the Raptors finished 47-35 and made their first playoff appearance in five seasons. It was also their first winning season since 2001-02.

Bryan Colangelo is also an architect of this season’s Raptors, who are the Eastern Conference’s second-best squad.

He selected DeMar DeRozan with the ninth pick of the 2009 draft. Colangelo hired Dwayne Casey as the head coach in June 2011. He drafted Jonas Valanciunas with the fifth pick of the 2011 draft two days later. Then, after drafting Terrence Ross with the eighth pick in 2012, he acquired Kyle Lowry in a trade with Houston Rockets in July 2012.

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No. 4: Should losing teams rest players? The Sacramento Kings are going nowhere except the draft lottery again, a fate that has been assured for weeks. However, that hasn’t stopped them from sitting players. DeMarcus Cousins and Rajon Rondo, among others, have “rested” as though they were veterans with minor ailments, awaiting for the playoffs to begin. Is that fair, especially since the NBA, beginning with this season, spaced games apart and reduced back-to-backs? The Kings are hardly the only non-playoff team to sit players for reasons other than injury; but some fans in Sacramento sounded off on it to Andy Furillo of the Sacramento Bee

At 12:31 p.m. Thursday, the Kings put out a news release that said DeMarcus Cousins and Rajon Rondo would not play that night at home against the Minnesota Timberwolves. It attributed the planned absences of the star center and flashy point guard to their need for rest. The two must have really been tired, because they just got a night off Saturday in Denver and a night off the previous Monday in Portland.

Along with Rondo and Cousins, another young man at Sleep Train Arena on Thursday night was tired. His name is Terrence Zwane, and he was tired of big-money players resting on nights like Thursday, when he paid $300 to sit in the lower bowl.

“I don’t think it’s cool,” said Zwane, 26, a legal assistant who attends about 10 games a year.

Zwane reasoned, accurately, that the salaries of Cousins, who is making about $15.9 million this season, and Rondo, who punches the clock for $9.5 million, are largely responsible for his high cost for a good seat. The abilities of the two, of course, are the reason Zwane was willing to spend the money. Then he came to the game and they didn’t play, and the team didn’t even make the announcement that they were not going to play until seven hours before the game, when the two players were as healthy as could be reasonably expected for the 79th game of the season

Resting a player for one or two games over the course of a long season, “if you need to do that,” makes sense to Zwane. Otherwise, in instances such as Thursday, “It’s really pointless, especially when you are paying them big money and we are paying big money to watch them,” he said.

Without Cousins and Rondo, the Kings understandably lost to the Timberwolves 105-97. Maybe they needed Thursday off to ensure they would be rested enough to play in Saturday’s final game at Sleep Train Arena, which is expected to be filled beyond capacity to celebrate 28 seasons there.

After Thursday’s game, Kings coach George Karl was asked what he would say to the fans, if he could say anything, about paying big money to see the game and then having Cousins and Rondo miss it to rest.

Karl was the wrong guy to take the question. It should have been directed to general manager Vlade Divac, but Divac wasn’t on hand, so the coach gave it a shot.

“I’m old school,” Karl said. “I like playing every game like it means something.”

But in the modern NBA, “everybody’s doing it,” Karl said about giving guys days of rest when it appears to people like Zwane that they don’t really need it.

“Philosophically,” Karl said, “I can see the good in why you do it, and I can see philosophically why the fans should be upset, why they’re upset.”

In addition to holding Cousins and Rondo out of the Minnesota, Denver and Portland games, the playoff-eliminated Kings rested Kosta Koufos, Rudy Gay and Darren Collison in Tuesday’s loss at home to Portland.

As Karl said, it is popular for teams to dial back on playing time for those who have been pounding the floorboards fairly relentlessly since October. Most of the time, the decisions to rest players are made collectively – between the front office, coaching staff and players – although it’s not known how the decision was made by the Kings.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Not only does Kobe Bryant want the Warriors to break the Bulls’ record of 72 wins, so does LeBron JamesFred Holberg says the Bulls need to figure out a leadership command for next seasonBrent Barry was asked his opinion of the Timberwolves and also about the coaching position, and Bones was to happy to share his thoughtsCan Alec Burks stay healthy and help the Jazz lock up a playoff spot?

Morning Shootaround — Jan. 3


VIDEO: The Fast Break: January 2

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Curry reinjures leg, Warriors win in overtime | Jack injures knee, will have MRI | Pistons, Pacers end with theatrics | Pop says Crawford will be missed

No. 1:Curry reinjures leg, Warriors win in overtime After leading the Golden State Warriors to a historic 29-1 start to the season, Stephen Curry missed the last two games while resting a shin injury. It is no coincidence that the Warriors went 1-1 without Curry, the NBA’s leading scorer at 29.7 points per game. Curry made his return last night against the Denver Nuggets, but had to exit in the second quarter after aggravating his injury. As Ethan Strauss writes for ESPN.com, even down to six players, the Warriors managed to win in overtime even without the MVP…

After missing the two previous games with a left shin contusion suffered Monday against the Sacramento Kings, Curry reinjured the shin and departed to the locker room with 2:15 remaining in the second quarter.

According to Curry, the injury occurred when a Nuggets player made contact with his leg in the second quarter.

“I got kicked,” Curry said after the game.

Curry confirmed it was a reinjury of his earlier contusion and said he was hit “right in the same spot, playing defense. It’s funny. I guess whenever you hurt something, [if] you try to play through a little bit of discomfort and try to get out there, something happens. Just got to deal with it.”

Curry’s injury left the Warriors with only six available players due to myriad other injuries.

Of the overtime victory Golden State gained despite depletion, Curry praised, “Chips stacked against them, short bench, guys playing 40-plus minutes, found a way to scrap and claw, get stops down the stretch, fight through the fatigue factor, make a couple plays on the offensive plays as well. Gutsy win.”

On how he felt going into the game, Curry said, “I felt pretty good, just somewhat fresh legs and didn’t have to compensate for anything. Just sucks that was the spot that I got hit in. See how it feels for Monday.”

Further elaborating on his prognosis, he added, “I know exactly what happened. It’s just a matter of how it feels tomorrow and go from there. It’s not as bad as the first time it happened, so that’s good news.”


VIDEO: Curry reinjures left leg

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Back and Forth with Bones: Going beyond Durant and Westbrook


VIDEO: Dwyane Wade scores 28 points as the Heat defeat the Thunder.

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Miami Heat got their best win of the season on Thursday, edging the Oklahoma City Thunder 97-95 in a back-and-forth affair.

It was a matchup of the league’s No. 2 offense (Oklahoma City) against the No. 3 defense (Miami). And the No. 3 defense won out, holding the Thunder to barely a point per possession.

Did the Thunder help them out, though? Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook are the most potent offensive pairing in the league, but the Oklahoma City offense can sometimes rely too much on their talent and get stuck when the primary options aren’t available.

NBA.com’s John Schuhmann and NBA TV’s Brent Barry went back and forth after the game, discussing the Thunder offense, what works and what doesn’t.

Schuhmann: The Thunder are a team that defies the idea that a great offense has to have great ball movement. They’re No. 2 in offensive efficiency, even though they rank last in passes per game and 25th in assist rate. But it always feels like their inability to move the ball comes back to bite them on critical possessions where their one-on-one stuff results in contested jumpers off the dribble.

Barry: They’re really sporadic in involving players other than Durant and Westbrook. The way that those guys get their offense doesn’t necessarily come out of execution to get them shots in spots where they can be most effective. It’s just that they end up getting shots because … they got shots.

It’s very unpredictable as to how and when they’re going to get involved in the offense, which is a testament to those guys being ready to shoot.

One of the things that was evident is how unsettling some possessions are for their defensive balance. They give up a lot of transition opportunities because the floor isn’t balanced. Even though their offensive numbers are great, the way that they’re scoring is unsettling their defense for 10-15 possessions a game.

Schuhmann: Turnovers is a part of that, but also the way that Westbrook attacks.

Barry: Unpredictable attacks, shots off of actions where guys might be on the weak side doing something and they’re really not noticing that the shot has gone up. And a longer shot often produces a longer rebound, which can give the other team a head start.

Miami exposed that a little, but we know that Miami doesn’t want to play fast. If they can do that, you got to think that against Western Conference teams that can really go – the Clippers, the Warriors – that’s a little bit dangerous.

Note: Miami’s 15 fast break points on Thursday was their fourth highest mark of the season, but just one less than their season high.

Schuhmann: While the Thunder offense is functioning mostly from the talent of two guys, they’re not just giving the ball to Durant and Westbrook and saying “Go to work.” There are some some really devastating plays and actions that they run … a Westbrook/Durant pick-and-roll, a Westbrook/Ibaka pick-and-roll where Durant’s defender is responsible for tagging Serge Ibaka on his roll to the basket.

Barry: Billy Donovan is probably stressing to them to make the extra pass, but there’s not a lot of outlets for them. I wrote down a couple of plays…

Early second quarter, Durant has an offensive possession where he’s posted up. You want KD in iso, but there’s no outlet for him.

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The very next possession, you’ll see Dion Waiters moving around in space where there’s nobody to be the release valve for him.

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Then on Miami’s side, there’s a play where Bosh scores on a pick-and-roll, because he’s the outlet for Dragic. I’m watching Miami and where it is that they have guys spaced for the ball-handler so, if he gets into trouble, he has parachutes on either side. He can pull the ripcord and he’s got guys to go to.

In OKC’s offense, some of their possessions just leave guys out on islands where they have to take difficult shots. They’re put in positions where there’s nowhere else to go.

Schuhmann: That’s partly on them, though. Durant and Westbrook clearly like to stop the ball and play one-on-one.

Barry: I’m OK with those guys, but if you play deeper into the clock and the ball ends up in the hands of someone else … if it’s Anthony Morrow and he doesn’t have an open three, you have to give him some place to go. If it’s Waiters, instead of inviting for him to take the shot all the time, sometimes you have to provide the option where you can go back and say, “Dion, you got to make that next pass.”

There was a great play later in the second quarter where Enes Kanter sets a pin-down screen for Durant, who comes up and flips the high screen-and-roll. Westbrook blows by his defender, the big has to step up, and he drops it off for Kanter.

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That kind of possession? Money, because there’s a guy in the corner for Russ and he’s got Durant drawing attention, so there’s less help. That kind of initial thrust is good. It’s just a one-pass possession, but a good one.

The most difficult possessions to guard are when, if you don’t get something off your initial thrust, the ball moves from one side of the floor to the other. Strong side to weak side. This is everything the Warriors predicate their offense on. This is what San Antonio does. This is the way the Triangle worked for years.

You’re asking five guys to defend five guys. If you explore, you’re going to find two guys that are not willing to play defense for 24 seconds. Great teams will do that, but within the first 12 seconds of the shot clock, going side to side, you can expose one or two defenders who aren’t willing to respond. Maybe they don’t want to put in the effort or maybe they’re just out of position because the ball moved and bodies moved, and they’re susceptible to the next action.

Obviously, with Durant and Westbrook, OKC is a dangerous team, and they’re still working on things.

Schuhmann: How do you defend the Westbrook/Durant pick-and-roll?

Barry: The biggest thing you have to do, as Durant’s defender, is get that screen pushed up as high as possible, because your best chance in guarding Westbrook is to slide under that Durant pick.

If I’m Durant’s defender, I want to come up with him and be physical with him up to the screen. And at the point of the screen, I want to give him a push, release and step back. That gives Westbrook’s defender room to slide in between, so that he can catch Russell on the penetration.

You’re trying to avoid the switch, so you don’t have Westbrook isolated against your three man or Durant in the post against a smaller guard.

Now other question is, if Russell are Kevin are involved on the strong side, who are you fearing on the weak side? If you do end up switching, you can front KD in the post and bring help from the back side, especially if Andre Roberson is in the game. He’s not an offensive threat.

They’re still learning how to execute this play to be very effective at it. And it changes on a nightly basis, depending on who’s defending them.

Back and Forth with Bones: Some Growing Pains in Milwaukee


VIDEO: LeBron James’ 27 points lead the Cavs over the Bucks

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Cleveland Cavaliers ended a two-game losing streak, avenged a weekend loss, and improved to 9-3 with a 115-100 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Thursday.

The Cavs shot 56 percent and scored 115 points on just 86 possessions, which says a lot about both their offense and Milwaukee’s defense. The Bucks (5-7) went from 29th in defensive efficiency in 2013-14 to second in Jason Kidd‘s first season, but are right back where they started after 11 games.

NBA.com’s John Schuhmann and NBA TV’s Brent “Bones” Barry, who called the game for TNT, went back and forth afterward, discussing the Bucks’ issues on both ends of the floor and where they are in their development.

Schuhmann: So what’s the difference between last season’s Milwaukee defense and this season’s Milwaukee defense?

Barry: Some tell-tale signs have to do with some basic fundamentals of a very good NBA defense. And that’s one, communication and, two, trust in one another that guys are going to be in the right spots at the right times.

Talking to Jason Kidd, in the early part of this season, the Bucks are doing A decently and doing B decently, but when they get to C, there’s nobody home. There’s missing the last step to finish off a possession.

Some of that has to do with a variety of lineups. They’ve had seven different starting lineups to start the season. They’ve had key pieces out of games. Giannis Antetokounmpo, Michael Carter-Williams, Jabari Parker, John Henson and O.J. Mayo have all missed games. Greg Monroe is a new addition.

So there’s so much disconnect in terms of who’s playing that it’s affected how much they trust one another to begin the year. They’re not playing as hard on that end as they’re capable of, and they know it.

The main thing that Jason kept talking about was “We’re young. We miss Zaza [Pachulia] and we miss Jared Dudley and we miss Ersan [Ilyasova], because those guys have experience. We have no veteran players.”

So there’s nobody but the coaching staff to talk about what it’s like to come in every day to work and what your role is.

Schuhmann: Going back to their defense, their scheme puts so much pressure on those second and third rotations. They load up the strong side and when the ball is swung, the pressure is on the weak-side guys to close out, contest and contain.

Barry: They have to close out properly. Great defenses close out on shooters to direct the ball to a certain area of the floor, because you trust that the next guy in the rotation is there.

Last night, there were glaring examples of how ineffective and how inactive the Bucks’ hands are, in terms of deflections and denials. I’ve looked at some numbers on their pressure rate, and it’s way down.

They had so many miscommunications on switches. That’s something that they absolutely can do, but they don’t communicate well. When they give space, they’re going to get beat. Especially in the first half against Cleveland, they had no awareness of where shooters were. They were much better in the second half, but that cost them and gave them such a deficit that their offense is incapable of having bursts to catch up to teams, especially Cleveland.

Schuhmann: That Milwaukee offense is very slow and deliberate. The Bucks rank 30th in pace and they’ve attempted just 10.8 percent of their shots in the first six seconds of the shot clock, the sixth lowest rate in the league.

Barry: They run corner series. They don’t run a lot of pick-and-rolls. Maybe other than Jerryd Bayless, they don’t have effective pick-and-roll players. And they don’t go in transition.

They’re trying to get better ball movement, but better slashing. But when you have combinations of players who haven’t played with one another, it’s very difficult to read your teammates if you don’t know what they like to do and when they like to do it. And that’s costing them a lot of possessions on offense, where they just aren’t in synch.

Schuhmann: They did have a relatively efficient offensive game on Thursday and had some success in the third quarter with Greivis Vasquez and Khris Middleton running side pick-and-roll to get a switch against Middleton in the post.

Barry: The 1-2. But that was against Matthew Dellavedova and Richard Jefferson. I don’t know if it’s that effective against a quicker, better defensive backcourt.

Jason went to that several times and it helped them get some shots, but that’s a single-option thing. If you score a couple of times and then they double you, what’s next? Right now, there’s no next on the offensive end of the floor.

Schuhmann: A similar thing that they do is set a back-screen to get the opposing point guard switching onto Middleton in the post. It gets them some good looks, but like you said, opponents are going to adjust to it pretty quickly.

Barry: I don’t know how much more effective that is late in the shot clock. It’s probably better to get side-to-side movement and then that action late, rather than broadcast it with the post-up on the first pass, where the defense can load up and be in good rebounding position.

One thing that bothered me is that they’re getting pushed up so high on the initial catch in the corner series. When Monroe sets up at the elbow and a guy like Tristan Thompson pushes him from the elbow to the 3-point line, the corner series doesn’t work.

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You can’t make passes to back-door cutters from the 3-point line. A dribble hand-off is too far away to create a good angle for the offense.

Schuhmann: When Kidd was coaching in Brooklyn, I covered a Knicks-Nets game where the Nets didn’t run pick-and-roll for most of the first half against an opponent that was just dreadful at defending pick-and-rolls (and coincidentally employed Andrea Bargnani and Amar’e Stoudemire).

That Nets team did have some good pick-and-roll guards, but just kept running the offense through the bigs at the elbow, which was often a struggle. You have to have a pick-and-roll game to take advantage of the Bargnanis and Enes Kanters of the world.

Barry: Now, there was some signs tonight. Giannis was spectacular. He showed so much versatility in his game and did a decent job on LeBron James.


VIDEO: Giannis’ 33 points

When you play Giannis and Parker together, you can pick and choose weaker defenders at the three and four spots to take advantage of their quickness and what they can do handling the ball. Jason explored that in the second half to the Bucks’ advantage. They picked on Kevin Love a little bit, on Thompson a little bit, with those guys playing off the elbow to create some offense.

But until they’re complete and until they do some growing up… It just sounds like where they want to go is three or four years down the road.

Schuhmann: It was kind of fun to see the Bucks’ elicit some Spurs-esque ball movement (Example 1, Example 2) from Cleveland last night.

Barry: The Cavs did do a nice job. And with Mo Williams out, Dellavedova had 13 assists, doing a nice job of taking what the defense was going to give him. He penetrated and drew two guys…

And that’s part of the learning process for the Bucks. What’s the point in going over to double-team Dellavedova? Why would you step over the median line and commit to the strong side, when that’s the guy you’d rather have try and score on you?

But yeah, that was encouraging for the Cavs to move the ball like they did and not have LeBron need to take over multiple possessions in a row to make things happen. They had other guys making things happen.

Schuhmann: I can’t remember a single possession where LeBron stopped the ball, backed out to the 3-point line and killed clock with his isolation dance.

Barry: We flashed a graphic with a little over a minute to go in the fourth quarter that LeBron had 19 passes and zero field goal attempts in the period. That was probably the least amount of energy he’s had to expend in the fourth quarter to help the Cavs secure a win.

Schuhmann: And their shot chart – minimal mid-range shots, mostly layups and threes – was what you’d want.

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You mentioned in the broadcast how they also took advantage of the Bucks’ weak-side guards having to defend duck-ins from the Cleveland bigs.

Barry: When the ball was on the wing, the Bucks’ brought a second defender over, where they weren’t coming to double-team, but just coming over and squatting on the box. I understand the strategy, but you’re committing a guy to space and not to double the ball, which is [expletive].

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So they got caught on that a lot.

Schuhmann: The Bucks’ defense, even when it’s playing well, is banking on the fact that they can recover to the weak side before you get the ball there. But there’s no skip-passer in the league better than LeBron.

Barry: J-Kidd said before the game, “We can not allow fastballs.” I hadn’t heard that term before, but I knew what he was talking about. He said, “You let LeBron throw fastballs for threes, we’re never going to get to the shooters.”

If you don’t get into his body, you’re going to get killed.

Back and forth with Bones: Time to double LeBron


VIDEO: Mike Malone breaks down how Cleveland has dictated the pace

CLEVELAND — The Golden State Warriors’ season could be on the line Thursday in Game 4 of The Finals (9 p.m. ET, ABC). The Warriors were the best team in the league by a wide margin in the regular season, but have not looked like themselves for much of the first three games.

The series has been played at the Cleveland Cavaliers’ pace. LeBron James has dominated the series, accounting for about 2/3 of the Cavs’ points via his own points and assists. He hasn’t been all that efficient, but it’s been enough with the Cavs slowing the Warriors down and stifling their ball movement.

At first glance, it seems clear that the Warriors need to get things going offensively to tie the series before it heads back to Oakland for Game 5 on Sunday. But NBA TV analyst Brent Barry (aka “Bones”) believes that their adjustments should start on the other end of the floor.

Schuhmann: The Warriors have scored less than a point per possession through the first three games, so most people’s first thought is that they need to play better or change things up offensively. But you want to see a change on defense.

Barry: In order for their offense to find its rhythm again, they can create more opportunities by what they do defensively, which will help with their pace. How many times in Game 3 did the Cavs shoot the ball late in the shot clock?

Schuhmann: Thirty-one of their 76 shots (about 41 percent) came in the last seven seconds of the clock. For the series, they’ve taken 39 percent of their shots in the last seven seconds, which is more than twice the league average (18 percent) from the regular season.

Links: Game 3 shots with 0-4 on the clock | with 4-7 on the clock

Barry: That’s an insane number.

A lot of times, LeBron is getting the ball on the wing and they’re giving him space to the point where the defender — Harrison Barnes or Andre Iguodala — finally tries to slow him down or stand him up at this point, what Pop (Gregg Popovich) would refer to as the “Karl Malone spot,” which is on the line from the elbow to the corner. It’s one dribble away, for guys that are quick enough, to get to the basket or draw a foul.

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The Warriors’ defensive principle is Andrew Bogut or Festus Ezeli are hanging below, and when LeBron gets to this point, his defender is supposed to get to the top side, turn him baseline and we have “baseline go.”

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NBA unveils 2014-15 schedule Wednesday


VIDEO: LeBron James and the Cavaliers are talking championship this season in Cleveland

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — LeBron James has everyone in Cleveland, and many around the league, thinking about a title chase for the Cavaliers.

We shall see. But whatever the Cavs do this season, chances are pretty good we’ll be able to see much of it live on TV.

LeBron and the new-look Cavs figure to be a prime-time fixture on NBA broadcast outlets during the 2014-15 regular season. NBA TV will unveil the entire regular-season national television schedule Wednesday on the NBA 2014-15 Schedule Release Special at 6 p.m. ET.

The show will highlight the season’s biggest games, most highly anticipated matchups, the opening week schedule, the Christmas Day games and the Martin Luther King Jr. Day games. The entire schedule will be posted on NBA.com in conjunction with the NBA TV special, which will be hosted by Rick Kamla and feature NBA TV’s Brent Barry. Contributors from around the league will offer insight and analysis.

The Cavaliers, who haven’t made the playoffs since James left four years ago, are a team that will be headlined by All-Stars James, Kyrie Irving and, very possibly, Kevin Love (pending the finalization of  a reported trade between the Minnesota Timberwolves and Cavaliers, a trade that also includes Andrew Wiggins, the Cavs’ No. 1 pick in last month’s Draft). Many already are predicting huge things for James and the Cavs.

It’s safe to say there will be no shortage of other intriguing storylines for the upcoming season, too, what with seismic changes in the Central Division alone, not to mention the retooling of all of the contenders chasing the reigning champion San Antonio Spurs.

Whether the road to the NBA championship runs through Cleveland, San Antonio, Chicago, Oklahoma City, Los Angeles (Clippers)  or somewhere else, we’ll find out all the regular-season steps on Wednesday night.

Horry’s HOF scale … does it exist?


VIDEO: Robert Horry, a seven-time NBA champion, earned his nickname “Big Shot Bob” the old-fashioned way!

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Whenever his name is mentioned, the words “NBA legend” usually accompany Robert Horry.

How else should one refer to a man who in 16 NBA seasons collected seven championship rings, played alongside some of the game’s all-time greats, earned the nickname “Big Shot Bob” for his clutch shooting heroics on the biggest stage and has become a cult figure with his own measurement for big shots (All Ball’s famed Horry Scale)?

Horry piled up championship experiences during his playing days that many of his more celebrated contemporaries would trade All-Star nods for. And perhaps even some of that cash they made. What would you want more, the adulation, fortune and fame — all of which inevitably fades over time — or the timeless prestige of seven, count ’em seven, championship rings?

I’d have to think long and hard about that one, really!

The purists have every right to laugh off the Horry belongs in the Hall of Fame argument. He never averaged more than 12 points per game during any season in his career, and he didn’t reach double digits once during his final 12 seasons in the league. Horry only started in 480 of a possible 1,107 games he played in during the regular seasons of his 16 years.

Still, few players were feared the way Horry was with the ball in his hands late and the game on the line. And therein lies the dilemma for a specialist, a role player extraordinaire like Horry. There is no metric available that would bolster his case for entry into the Hall of Fame, his individual numbers (a ho-hum 7,715 career points and nary an All-Star bid) just do not stack up to the Hall of Fame water line. And yet you feel like there has to be some sort of recognition for someone who has accomplished the things Horry did during his career.

He was eligible for consideration with the 2014 class and didn’t make the cut. Horry will join a deep pool of carryover candidates for the 2015 class, headlined by newcomer Dikembe Mutombo, and a star-studded group that includes the likes of Kevin Johnson, Tim Hardaway, Spencer Haywood, Chris Webber and Penny Hardaway. They all have stronger individual cases than Horry but possess none of the championship hardware he brings to the party.

Horry reminds me of the NFL specialists who have struggled for years to gain entry to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. It took Ray Guy, arguably the greatest punter in football history, forever to crash through that glass ceiling.

Complicating matters for Horry and others is the fact that the recognition in the Naismith Hall of Fame isn’t just about what a player has done during his professional career. It’s a culmination of an entire life in the game, from high school to college and all the way up to the very top of the heap.

Horry played a significant part in Hall of Famers and future Hall of Famers like Hakeem Olajuwon, Shaquille O’Neal, Tim Duncan and Kobe Bryant gobbling up the championship rings that highlight their respective credential lists. If you don’t believe it, ask Phil Jackson or Gregg Popovich, all-time great coaches who know the worth of a truly game-changing role player.

While I’m not ready to argue that Horry deserves to be immortalized in Springfield the way the best of the all-time best have been and always will be, and deservedly so. I do think there needs to be some sort of special recognition for a an elite specialists like Horry, a guy whose accomplishments, even in a supporting role, are unparalleled by anyone else during his era.

Can’t he get a plaque or commemorative brick or something to acknowledge his unique contribution to the game?

Ultimately, Horry might have to settle for the scale, the universal love he gets from all corners of the basketball galaxy and the knowledge deep down that there are plenty of men already in the Hall of Fame and on their way who would do anything for just one of his seven rings!

Back And Forth With Bones: Magic-Wizards

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — Back and Forth With Bones is an e-mail exchange between NBA.com’s John Schuhmann and NBA TV’s Brent Barry during a Monday night game. This week, they sat down (Schuhmann at home in New Jersey, Barry in the studio in Atlanta) to watch the 6-10 Orlando Magic visit the 8-9 Washington Wizards.

Pre-game

Schuhmann: Hey Bones, we got Magic-Wizards tonight.

The Wiz have won six of their last eight games with an improved offense (103.5 points per 100 possessions vs. 98.5 in their first nine games). For the season, they’ve been great on both ends of the floor with John Wall, Nene and Marcin Gortat on the floor with two of the Trevor Ariza/Bradley Beal/Martell Webster group, outscoring opponents by 14.3 points per 100 possessions. But all other lineups have been dreadful. So depth is an issue, especially with Beal out.

They’re a jump-shooting team. Only two teams (New York and Portland) have taken a lower percentage of shots from the paint. But they’re tied with the Heat for the league lead in corner 3-pointers. Wall has 32 assists on corner 3s (10 more than anybody else in the league) and Ariza and Webster are tied for second with 23 corner threes.

So that has to be a priority for Orlando’s defense, which ranks 26th in defending corner 3s and has been pretty bad over the last nine games after a strong start. I don’t know if Jameer Nelson is available (and the Magic offense has been pretty awful with him off the floor), but the Wall-Victor Oladipo matchup should be fun.

The Wizards have been a good defensive rebounding team with Gortat and Nene on the floor together, but pretty awful when one or both sits. So Nikola Vucevic could have some success if either gets in foul trouble.

Thoughts?

Barry: Yes, Randy Wittman is auditioning players to help take the load off of the starting group. But this game is interesting to me in that there is a lot of positivity regarding the Wizards recent play. Can they accept and continue what it is that has gotten them there?

With Beal out, I am stoked to see Martell Webster getting quality starter minutes, though 40-plus (in three of those) is too many. He’s just ready to get in there and mix it up, being a pro.

Watching John Wall balance out his game tonight will be key. Quality possessions against a team in Orlando that competes and shares the ball on offense are a must. The bigs must stay out of foul trouble for Washington.

Orlando is not a huge dribble-penetrate attack team other than Oladipo. It’s interesting that the Wiz have had this stretch with Beal (NBA minutes leader and their leading scorer) out.

Is Arron Afflalo an Eastern Conference All-Star? Hard to say he hasn’t played like one.

Schuhmann: Nah, the East All-Stars should just be six players each from Indiana and Miami.

Barry: Add four from the West to the East. Any player born east of the Mississippi can qualify for East team headed to NO!

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Back And Forth With Bones: Bulls-Jazz

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — Back and Forth With Bones is an email exchange between NBA.com’s John Schuhmann and NBA TV’s Brent Barry during a Monday night game. This week, they sat down (Schuhmann at home in New Jersey, Barry in the studio in Atlanta) to watch the 6-6 Chicago Bulls and the 1-14 Utah Jazz on NBA TV.

Pregame

Schuhmann: I think this game qualifies as the Saddest Matchup of the Season. The Bulls just lost Derrick Rose for the year and the Jazz are 1-14, having trailed three of their last four games by at least 28 points. But somebody has to win tonight!

Chicago has actually been much better defensively with Rose off the floor, and Kirk Hinrich and Jimmy Butler is a pretty strong defensive backcourt. But for the time being, they’re also without Butler. So Marquis Teague and Tony Snell will each have a chance to prove they belong in the rotation. Long-term, they should be OK defensively, and they’ve been pretty poor offensively thus far, but they won’t be able to get much better without Rose.

And obviously, this puts more pressure on Carlos Boozer, Luol Deng and Joakim Noah to play big minutes and stay healthy. Noah’s minutes (29.3) are down below where he was two years ago (30.4) after a big increase last season (36.8), but I wonder if they go back up now that Rose is out.

Utah had two of their better offensive games upon Trey Burke‘s arrival, but they’ve actually been at their best with Diante Garrett playing point. This guy is a plus-24 for a team that’s been outscored by 67 points since he arrived.

Chicago can get points on second chances. They rank third in offensive rebounding percentage and the Jazz rank 29th in defensive rebounding percentage. It’s strange that Utah is such a bad rebounding team with Derrick Favors and Enes Kanter (who’s out with a sprained ankle) up front. They’re actually worse with both of them on the floor than they are overall, but we talked a couple of weeks ago about how they extend out too much on their pick-and-roll coverage.

What are you looking for tonight?

Barry: So many things going wrong for both of these teams. Both are coming off very embarrassing performances and have a number of players in the role of proving they belong to be in the rotation, if not in the NBA.

The Kanter loss for the Jazz will greatly affect their ability to score points. Burke is trying to get his legs and conditioning back after just one start. And beginning his career with a team under these circumstances is very very tough.

I guess this game boils down to the identity of the teams. The Bulls have one and Utah has yet to establish one. I look for the Bulls to respond in a way that they have in the past without Rose. Even though the makeup of this team is different, they should be able to pull this game out with the experience of their roster.


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