Posts Tagged ‘Bradley Beal’

Blogtable: Most entertaining team to watch in 2015-16?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Top international newcomer? | Most entertaining team? | Too many preseason games?



VIDEOWho are the must-watch teams on League Pass in 2015-16?

> The ________ will be the most entertaining team to watch this season, and here’s why.

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Warriors. They already were, and they brought the band back together. Steph Curry spent the summer trying to become even more efficient, and dropped 40 on New Orleans in the opener. The second and third years in a new offense are when a truly smart and skilled team blossoms. Which means trouble for the other 29 teams.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: For the second straight season, the NBA’s most entertaining team probably will be its best team — the Golden State Warriors. A club like the Clippers might pack more personality and purists might find entertainment value in the care and nurturing of a young, developing crew such as Milwaukee or Orlando. Personally, I still get my kicks watching 40 percent of the Memphis Grizzlies – that is, big men Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol playing old-millennium ball in a 3-crazed NBA. But night in, night out, for pace and production and their undersized leader out top (Steph Curry), Golden State is sports’ DWTS.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: The defending-champion Golden State Warriors. Have we forgotten so quickly, the ball movement, the shot-making the versatility, the sheer beauty of the Warriors that practically begged for a musical score in the background?  Play it again, Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green and the rest.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The Warriors. I considered the Thunder because it’s Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook, Serge Ibaka joined by the uncertainty of a new coach, and that wonder of how Billy Donovan will work out adds to the good theater. But c’mon. Golden State is a fun watch anyway, and now the defending champs have the entire league chasing them … while hearing about how the title was luck … and firing back at doubters … with a coach who routinely dishes snark. That’s entrainment.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The Thunder. So much at play here, with Kevin Durant returning and seeking to restore his MVP glow, and how Russell Westbrook tries to top what he did the last three months of last season, and what Billy Donovan has in store for a system. Oh, and there’s also the backdrop of KD’s pending free agency. To me, entertainment means points and wins and showdown games against top competition, and OKC will hit that trifecta.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe Warriors are the easy answer, and the Thunder are a distant second. But in the Eastern Conference, the Washington Wizards could be Warriors Light. John Wall can’t shoot anything like Stephen Curry, but he’s one of the league’s best passers who will thrive with more space to operate. If Bradley Beal and Otto Porter can build on their postseason performances, this can be a pretty potent offense led by one of the league’s five best point guards.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The Clippers have all the ingredients you need to be the No. 1 reality TV show in basketball, both on and off the court. They’ll be the most interesting team to watch, as coach Doc Rivers tries to tinker with the chemistry of a championship-caliber group that has added three ridiculously strong personalities in Paul Pierce, Josh Smith and Lance Stephenson. This is still Chris Paul‘s team, but he might have to share the leadership load with others in ways that he has not been accustomed to recently. They’ll put on a show when they are at their high-flying best.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The Clippers are going to be the edgiest and therefore most entertaining team. Their impatience will be their strength: Chris Paul and Blake Griffin are fed up with hearing about what they haven’t done, while DeAndre Jordan, Lance Stephenson and Josh Smith all want to be taken seriously. They are going to play with more attitude than any rival contender.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogHere’s the thing: Whichever team is the correct answer to this question is a team we aren’t talking about right now. Last season the Atlanta Hawks quickly evolved into a sweet passing tribute to Jogo Bonito, which transformed them into darlings of the basketball nerd set. And then there are the young teams that play entirely on spirit and fire with a style that may be unsustainable, but no less watchable. So I’ll take a guess and say a team that might be worth tuning in for, if healthy, will be the Minnesota Timberwolves. Between Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine performing nightly high-wire acts, Ricky Rubio splashing the ball around with abandon, and Kevin Garnett and Karl-Anthony Towns in the post, what’s not to like?

New offense energizes Wizards


VIDEO: Bradley Beal’s evolution is crucial to the Wizards’ season

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Bradley Beal insists it’s the best the Washington Wizards have looked during his time with the team.

So what if he’s talking about the often flimsy sample size that is NBA preseason.

When you basically pass on free agency (until next summer’s Kevin Durant free-for-all), install a new offensive system and ask everyone to buy into new and tweaked roles heading into what is sure to be a pivotal season, a seamless transition to a decidedly different way of operating offensively should ease whatever tensions might have lingered.

A comfort zone for Beal and All-Star point guard John Wall has to be the top priority for a Wizards team few people mention a contender in the Eastern Conference this season. LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers are at the top of everyone’s list, followed in some order by the Atlanta Hawks, Chicago Bulls, Miami Heat … and then the Wizards.

That dynamic backcourt is not only the key to the Wizards’ season, they’re also the selling point for the future, along with this new, player-friendly offense that coach Randy Wittman unveiled during the preseason. If the Wizards are serious about making noise this season in the Eastern Conference playoff chase and carrying that momentum into the summer of 2016, it all starts with this emphasis on the faster pace, which takes advantage of what Wall and Beal do best.

The Wizards had the highest offensive rating in the preseason (106.8 points per 100 possessions) and were fourth in pace (104.45 possessions per 48 minutes), a stark contrast from a team that finished 19th and 16th, respectively, in those categories last season.

We saw signs of the shift in the playoffs, when the Wizards threw a scare into the Hawks in the conference semifinals with their small-ball lineup. A summer of tinkering, training and a preseason of on-the-job training gives a team with basically the same core personnel (sans Paul Pierce, of course, who moved on to the Los Angeles Clippers) a chance to reinvent itself on the fly.

Otto Porter and Jared Dudley inherit the minutes and responsibilities Pierce handled last season, including the floor-stretching duties that opened things up for Beal and Wall in the postseason.


VIDEO: NBA.com’s John Schuhmann breaks down the Wizards’ new look on offense

Beal spoke of improved team camaraderie, better focus on the details and the always important good health that evaded him and the Wizards this time a year go. An improved and more efficient offensive system that the players “love,” according to Wall, paired with a top-10 defense that’s been a staple under Wittman, could serve as the wrinkle the Wizards need to move into the East’s upper echelon.

“Well, I think the Wizards obviously are a dangerous team, and they’ve proven that,” ABC/ESPN analyst Mark Jackson said, “and Randy Wittman has done an outstanding job coaching that team, leading that team, being strong in the face of tough times, holding on to the rope, which became contagious with the players where they bought in.

“I think it’s a different look for them because they certainly have post-up players that are skilled that they can take advantage of, at certain points of the game, but it really gives — adds versatility to that basketball team when you look at that dynamic backcourt in Wall and Beal, playing at a faster pace, creating an offense, stretching the floor is only going to make them tougher to defend, and I think ultimately a tough out in the Eastern Conference.”

If anyone knows about the importance of playing to the skills and abilities of a dynamic young backcourt duo, it’s Jackson. It’s what led to the rise of the Golden State Warriors during his tenure as he catered his system to Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson.

Wall and Beal are not Curry and Thompson, and there’s no one suggesting as much.

But they are talented in their own right and on a trajectory that could very well push the Wizards into the realm of teams capable of upsetting the projected East order before whatever free agent splash the team is planning for the summer.

Yes, we’re working on the fumes of the preseason, and that’s always a dangerous predicament.

But if you’re trying to both engineer a revolution and outperform expectations, as Beal and the Wizards are this season, you have to start somewhere.

Mission…

A photo posted by Bradley Beal (@bradbeal3) on

 

One Team, One Stat: Space in D.C.


VIDEO: Schuhmann’s Advanced Stats: Washington Wizards

NBA.com’s John Schuhmann gets you ready for the 2015-16 season with a key stat for each team in the league and shows you why it matters. Today, we look at the Washington Wizards, who changed their identity in the postseason.

The stat

20151024_was_3pa_incr

The context

20151024_was_basicsThe Wizards were a different team in the playoffs than they were in the regular season. After his team ranked 19th in offensive efficiency in the regular season, Wizards coach Randy Wittman broke out a floor-spacing lineup that made the offense more potent in the playoffs.

Back-up bigs Kris Humphries and Kevin Seraphin had their roles reduced, while starters Nene and Marcin Gortat played fewer minutes together.

Small forward Otto Porter, who was out of the rotation just three weeks before the playoffs began, averaged more than 33 minutes over postseason games. In fact, Porter and Paul Pierce played more minutes together in the playoffs (147) than Nene and Gortat did (139).

The Wizards were at their best, outscoring their opponents by 10.8 points per 100 possessions, with Porter on the floor. They were a plus-32 in 69 minutes with John Wall, Bradley Beal, Porter and Pierce on the floor with one of the two starting bigs.

20151024_was_jwbboppp

The smaller lineup wasn’t just about shooting more 3s. It also provided more space for Wall and Beal to attack the basket. Both of the Washington guards drove more often in the playoffs than they did in the regular season.

20151024_was_jwbb_drives

Other teams have seen a similar increase in the percentage of their shots that came from 3-point range. But of the last eight that saw a jump of at least six percentage points, only one really sustained it with a jump of at least that big from that regular season to the following one.

20151024_was_last10

But Wittman and Wizards president Ernie Grunfeld have seemingly embraced the idea of keeping the floor spaced for Wall and Beal. Pierce is gone, but the Wizards replaced him with Jared Dudley, another small-ball four. Porter is now the starting small forward, rookie Kelly Oubre Jr. is another wing who gives them some versatility, and Humphries has started shooting 3s.

In the preseason, Washington shot 28.9 percent of its shots from 3-point range, a higher rate than it did in last year’s playoffs. Pierce will be missed, but the Wizards could be one of the most improved offensive teams in the league. And if they can maintain a top-10 ranking on defense, they’ll have a shot at a 50-win season.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Blogtable: First-time All-Stars in 2015-16?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: One thing to watch early on? | Predicting Golden State’s season | First-time All-Stars



VIDEOCan Bradley Beal take that All-Star leap?

> Give me two players — one from the East and one from the West — who will be first-time All-Stars this season.

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: East: Bradley Beal. West: Andrew Wiggins.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: East: Giannis Antetokounmpo. It’s unclear which player Milwaukee is going to rally behind as a leader – Khris Middleton might lead the Bucks in scoring and Jabari Parker in time might have the game and personality to be their alpha dog – but “The Greek Freak” still packs outrageous potential in so many areas. If he takes a good-sized stride in development this season, and the Bucks stay at or above .500, I think the coaches will honor him. West: DeAndre Jordan. Jordan’s selection might be tougher in a league that goes with “Frontcourt” All-Stars rather than true centers. But I think he’ll have gaudy enough rebounding and blocked shot numbers on a Clippers team with a dazzling record by February.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: East: I’m thinking that Bradley Beal will finally catch a break avoiding injuries and build on his last two years of big-time performances in the playoffs to join backcourt partner John Wall as an All-Star. West: Kawhi Leonard. After MVP of the Finals (2014) and Kia Defensive Player of the Year (2015), it’s just a matter of him staying healthy. LaMarcus Aldridge will get the headlines, but Leonard is the all-around cream of the Spurs crop.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: East: Andre Drummond. The Pistons could push into the playoff picture and Drummond could be somewhere around 15 rebounds a game while near the top of the league in shooting and blocks. West: Kawhi Leonard, as part of a season that also includes making second- or third-team All-NBA at the end of the season. But it’s also impossible to disagree with Mike Conley, DeAndre Jordan or Gordon Hayward. No argument here for nominating any of those four, although Leonard, Conley and Jordan begin the season with an edge because Hayward will need to be especially worthy if the Jazz are headed toward the lottery.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: East: Bradley Beal. Beal had a strong postseason, has vowed to change some of his long 2-pointers into threes, and should have additional space to operate with the Wizards playing more small ball. West: Kawhi Leonard: Leonard is simply the league’s best player who hasn’t been an All-Star yet, and his offensive role should continue to grow. Dark horse picks: Nicolas Batum, Mike Conley, Andre Drummond, Reggie Jackson, DeAndre Jordan and Isaiah Thomas.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: East: Bradley Beal. He showed signs last season that he’s ready to take that step. He’ll join John Wall in Toronto for All-Star Weekend this season, in uniform on Sunday instead of street clothes. West: DeAndre Jordan. Both Kawhi Leonard and Draymond Green will battle it out in the Western Conference to join the All-Star crew. They both appear ready to take that step, but it’s a crowded field at small forward (and really at basically every position). But I’m picking Jordan to smash his way into the mix at center.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: East: Giannis Antetokounmpo. West: Gordon Hayward. The Jazz and Bucks are rising, and Hayward and Antetokounmpo are going to celebrate breakout All-Star years.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: East: how about Jahlil Okafor. He’s going to have the chance to rack up points and boards with the Sixers, and if a Rookie is putting up 18 and 10 or something like that, it would be neat to see the coaches give him a gift. West: Kawhi Leonard. The more I think about the Spurs adding LaMarcus Aldridge, the more I think it benefits Leonard. He has been mostly overlooked in the Spurs constellation of stars, but if maintains the aggressive defense he played most of last season’s second half, and gets more open looks as a result of Aldridge, Leonard could be the key to the Spurs’ success. And get an All-Star nod along the way.

Morning shootaround — Oct. 6


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 5

NEWS OF THE MORNING

George gets ‘clarification’ on role | Bucks’ Parker to miss preseason opener | Beal seeks to tweak his game | Bulls’ Gasol ages like a fine wine

No. 1: George gets ‘clarification’ on power forward role — Indiana Pacers small forward Paul George wasn’t a fan of moving to the power forward spot when the idea was first breached. He wasn’t a fan of it after scoring 18 points in the Pacers’ first preseason game (a loss to the New Orleans Pelicans). Yet after a talk with the team’s brass, it seems George has reversed field on his feeling on the switch and is more open to it, writes Candace Buckner of the Indianapolis Star:

Paul George drew national attention by making comments about his new role as the Indiana Pacers starting power forward after the first exhibition game. George matched up against New Orleans Pelicans All-Star Anthony Davis – either a welcomed introductory challenge or a complete nightmare depending on your view – and later opined: “I don’t know if I’m cut out for a 4 spot. I don’t know if this is my position.”

Then, George said he would seek input from coach Frank Vogel and team president of basketball operations Larry Bird into how he performed at the position. By Monday afternoon, George had spoken to them and found more interpretation.

“Yeah, we talked about it,” George said after Monday’s practice. “Just going over what was the plan going forward.

“I mean, there was clarification on what we’re (doing) going forward,” George added later. “That’s what it was, just clarification.”

When asked if the “clarification” meant changes to his role, George said: “We’re going to still stick with it, see how it works.”

Then, when quizzed if he’s OK with that, George responded: “I’m a part of this team.”

Though George offered few specifics of this meeting, the “clarification” appears to be more like repetition.

“Nothing we haven’t said in the past,” Vogel responded when asked about the conversation with George. “We’re going to continue to evaluate and get his feedback and what he’s comfortable with and what he’s not comfortable with. We’re not going to put him in a position where he’s not comfortable with his role. We’re just not going to do that. But we’re going to play both small lineups and big lineups, and he understands that.”

However after one preseason game – in fact, a loss in which Davis produced 18 points and eight rebounds without playing through the second half – George felt the matchup did not go well.

“We took it way left field. It’s Game 1 of the preseason, and we’re playing against arguably one of the best, if not the best, power forwards in this league,” George said on Monday. “So it was an adjustment. And (Davis) kicked my (butt). He kicked my (butt) Game 1.”

George and the Pacers will get a more moderate test in Detroit (7:30 p.m., Tuesday) against Ersan Ilyasova (who was 12-of-14 for 34 points in a game against Indiana last season). Ilyasova might be 6-10, 235, 15 pounds heavier than George, but he relies more on a perimeter game. Players such as Ilyasova are the reason the Pacers remain committed to playing with a smaller lineup.

“You can’t make small reactions. It’s going to be a big picture thing, and we’re going to do what’s best to win basketball games,” Vogel said. “Winning is more important than style of play, but this style of play, I think, gives us, this group, the best chance to win basketball games.”


VIDEO: Paul George talks about the discussion he had with the team’s brass

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Morning shootaround — Sept. 26


VIDEO: Brent Barry reports from Clippers media day

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Jackson to be more involved with Knicks | Pierce talks title, retirement | Skiles wants Magic to get defensive | New vets bring leadership to Boston

No. 1: Jackson to be more involved with Knicks — Team president Phil Jackson and head coach Derek Fisher won just 17 games in their first full season in New York. Now, to get better, they think they need to get together … more often. Jackson said Friday that he will take a more active, day-to-day role with the Knicks this year. Newsday‘s Al Iannazzone has the story…

Phil Jackson won’t be sitting on the bench, but he will spend more time in the coach’s office and film room this season — at the request of coach Derek Fisher.

Jackson, the Knicks president who won an NBA-record 11 championships coaching the Bulls and Lakers, wanted to give Fisher his space last season. But after the first-time coach guided the Knicks to a franchise-worst 17-win season, Fisher asked Jackson for assistance.

Fisher said he wanted more “one-on-one” discussions with Jackson to see how to prepare himself and the team better, and welcomes counseling from “one of the great basketball minds we’ve ever seen.” Jackson promises to be more involved and hands-on for his hand-picked protege.

***

No. 2: Pierce talks title, retirement — Paul Pierce is home. Paul Pierce is with a championship contender. And Paul Pierce turns 38 years old in a couple of weeks. You can write the script from there, as Dan Woike of the Orange County Register writes…

Paul Pierce already has an idea of how this all might end.

The Inglewood native and NBA veteran signs a deal to play for his hometown team, helping the Clippers win their first NBA title. He rides in the parade through his streets, trophy in hand, leaving his career behind him.

That’s the hope.

“I don’t have much basketball left – whether it’ll be this year or another year. To come home and play in front of family and friends and possibly win a championship, it’s like a dream come true,” Pierce said at Friday’s media day. “If we win this year, win a championship, I’ll probably be done with basketball to be honest.

“It’ll be a dream to be home and carry that championship trophy down Manchester Boulevard.”

By the way, all is cool with DeAndre Jordan and Chris Paul. It always was, apparently. Melissa Rohlin of the L.A. Times has the story…

When a Clippers contingent went to DeAndre Jordan’s home in Houston in July to help convince the center to re-sign with the Clippers, rumors abounded that Jordan and Chris Paul had a powwow to clear up their strained relationship.

Only thing is, according to the players, there was no strain.

“I think that there was forced tension because of everything we all heard that we said about each other, which was not true at all,” Jordan said at Clippers’ media day on Friday. “It was just the outside, and we never asked each other about it.

“These guys are my brothers. I talk to them every day. Yeah, there’s times that we bump heads on the court, but five minutes later, we’re good because it’s constructive, it’s for the right reasons: We want to win. … There’s not any tension; we don’t not like each other. And all three of us [Jordan, Paul and Blake Griffin] are going to be here for a very long time. This is our team; this is our unit. There was no clearing of the air. We just had a sit-down to tell them I was going to be in a Clipper uniform this year.”

***

No. 3: Skiles wants Magic to get defensive — When Scott Skiles took over the Milwaukee Bucks in 2008, they went from last in defensive efficiency to fourth in his second season. Now, Skiles is hoping to lead similar improvement with the Orlando Magic, who ranked 25th defensively last season. The Orlando Sentinel‘s Josh Robbins was at Magic media day on Friday…

Skiles intends to imbue the Magic with a brand-new identity: defensive-minded and hard-nosed. On several occasions Friday, he said the Magic need to transform themselves into a team that ranks in the top five in field-goal percentage defense.

Last season, they finished 28th in the NBA in field-goal percentage defense, allowing opponents to make 46.3 percent of their shot attempts.

“There’s been a lot of talk, even before I came here, about turning into a good defensive team,” Skiles said. “It hasn’t happened, and we need to do it.”

The Magic know all about Skiles’ goals. He has spoken with all of the players since he was hired in late May, and he has told them that they need to make significant strides defensively if they’re going to climb out of the NBA cellar and approach a winning record.

***

No. 4: New vets bring leadership to Boston — After squeezing into the playoffs with a young team last season, the Boston Celtics are looking to another step forward. It was another summer where Danny Ainge wasn’t able to acquire a star, but the Celtics did add a couple of veteran big men to their rotation. NBA.com‘s Ian Thomsen was at media day in Boston and takes a look at how David Lee and Amir Johnson could make an impact…

Lee, the 32 year old power forward, should fit in beautifully. The Warriors were able to win the championship last season in no small part because Lee (along with Andre Iguodala and Andrew Bogut) was willing to accept a reduced role for the good of the team. As Lee pursues a new contract next summer, his view of the bigger picture promises to affirm his identity: He will help the Celtics intangibly by keeping the focus on team goals.

He fills many needs for the Celtics. Lee, a two-time All-Star, is a strong rebounder, a smart passer and a versatile scorer. After sitting for most of the season, he was able to identify his team’s needs and make an impact instantly when the Warriors went small midway through the NBA Finals, helping to launch their comeback from a 2-1 deficit against the Cavaliers. Because the Celtics lack a singular playmaker in this era of leading point guards, Lee’s ability to make quick decisions with the ball should be crucial.

Neither Lee nor free-agent Johnson (whose two-year contract is non-guaranteed for 2016-17) has a reputation for selfishness. Both will be expected to provide leadership by example for the young Celtics. Johnson, at 6-9 and 240 pounds, will be asked to play minutes at center, along with Tyler Zeller and Kelly Olynyk.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Bulls’ Mike Dunleavy is out 8-10 weeks after undergoing back surgery … The Wizards have offered Bradley Beal a less-than-max extensionThe Wolves still like Ricky RubioJared Sullinger lost weightAn oral history of the best in-game dunk we’ve ever seen … Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov is going to camp … and the Nuggets waived Kostas Papanikolaou.

ICYMI: The best buzzer-beating highlights from last season:


VIDEO: 2014-15 Top 10 Buzzer-beaters

Morning Shootaround — Sept. 21

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Warriors offer Barnes $64 million extension | Wall, Wizards get jump start on training camp | Video analyst provided boost for Spain at EuroBasket

No. 1: Report: Warriors offer Barnes $64 million extension — The Golden State Warriors don’t want Harrison Barnes in the free agent pool next summer. They’ve offered Barnes a $64 million extension, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports, to make sure another member of the core group of their championship roster remains in the fold. More from Yahoo!:

The $16 million annual offer wasn’t accepted, but appears to be a starting point in talks that could last until the Oct. 31 deadline for rookie extensions.

The Warriors are trying to prevent Barnes from reaching restricted free agency in July 2016, when a rising salary cap and scores of teams with financial flexibility will couple with Barnes’ burgeoning talent and potential to make him a significant target on the market.

As a member of the 2012 NBA draft class, Barnes is eligible for his rookie contract extension. Without an agreement by Oct. 31, Barnes would become a restricted free agent next summer. Golden State would be able to match any offer sheet for Barnes and re-sign him.

The offer of $16 million per year annually – comparable to teammate Draymond Green‘s five-year, $82.5 million extension this summer – had been negotiated by Barnes’ former agent, Jeff Wechsler. After that initial offer, Wechsler countered with a figure north of $16 million annually before he and Barnes parted ways, league sources said. Jeff Schwartz of Excel Sports is representing Barnes now.

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Morning Shootaround — Sept. 7


VIDEO: Day Six Wrap: 2015 FIBA Americas Championship

NEWS OF THE MORNING

The reinvention of Anthony Bennett is real | Minute reductions for LeBron, Kyrie | White ready to take his place in Hall of Fame | Is Bradley Beal worth the max?

No. 1: The reinvention of Anthony Bennett is real — Anthony Bennett‘s summer has been one positive step after another, as the former No. 1 overall pick works to reinvent himself and prove that he’s not the “bust” some have labeled him. His work with Team Canada has only bolstered his cause. He’s been a bit of a revelation during the FIBA Americas tournament, playing a vital role on his national team, as Ryan Wolstat of the Toronto Sun writes:

Anthony Bennett didn’t have the loudest stat-line, but Canada’s resurgent star continues to be a key contributor for the squad.

Bennett quickly earned the confidence of head coach Jay Triano at training camp, was perhaps the best performer at the Pan Am Games in Toronto and was solid in Puerto Rico, before faring well here as well.

“I think Anthony Bennett’s summer has been absolutely fantastic for us,” Triano said after Canada defeated Panama on Sunday.

“He’s engaged in everything that we do on the floor, off the floor, rebounding. We’ve asked him to rebound, and he’s done it on a continuous basis. He runs the floor on a continuous basis. He provides help on the defensive end. He understands our defensive system.”

Confidence is important to Bennett and with Triano letting him just go out and play, he seems relaxed and is having fun. He looked relaxed before the game, throwing down a self-alley-oop reverse dunk in the layup line, and kept going from there.

“Coach was saying, ‘just line ’em up and knock ’em down,’ ” Bennett said.

“This is definitely a fun tournament to play in. A lot of competition, different teams, different styles so you’ve just got to adjust.”

Triano is pleased for the former No. 1 overall draft pick, who has had a tough first couple of NBA seasons.

“We told him earlier this summer if you do those things people are going to understand he’s got a lot of other offensive skills,” Triano said.

“His ability to pass the basketball, his ability to get teammates open. I’m really happy for him as an individual and we need him to continue to play that way.”

***

No. 2: Minute reductions for LeBron, Kyrie — The workload LeBron James and Kyrie Irving put in during their first season together in Cleveland won’t look the same this time around, and that’s not just because Kyrie might not be available until January due to injury. It’s time for a reduction in minutes for both of the Cavaliers’ stars, according to Terry Pluto of the Plain Dealer:

There was a report about Kyrie Irving not being ready to play until January.

No one knows for sure, as Irving is recovering from surgery to repair a fractured knee cap. But the Cavs do expect him to play well before January. Of course, that can change once they see him in training camp.

Even if Irving’s knee is in excellent shape, they plan to cut his minutes early in the season. He ranked No. 3 in average minutes per game last season. LeBron James was No. 5. I recently wrote about this.

That’s too much for both players during the regular season.

The Cavs signed veteran Mo Williams, who has started 511 games in the NBA. That includes 33 at point guard last season. He averaged 14 points and can take some of the scoring load off Irving in the backcourt.

The Cavs also have Matthew Dellavedova coming back. So they have Williams and Dellavedova to help out at point guard, allowing Irving to miss some games. He also can play fewer minutes.

The re-signing of J.R. Smith should help the Cavs cut the minutes for James during the regular season. The 6-foot-6 Smith can play both shooting guard and small forward.

***

No. 3: White ready to take his place in the Hall of Fame — Jo Jo White has had Hall of Fame credentials for years, but only now is the former Boston Celtics great taking his rightful place alongside other Celtics greats in Springfield. Even though the honor seems long overdue, White is appreciative that his time has finally come. Gary Washburn of the Boston Globe explains:

In playing in seven All-Star Games, being named MVP of the 1976 NBA Finals, and with a franchise-record 488 consecutive games played for the Celtics, White possessed Hall of Fame credentials. But it appears the Naismith committee has been slow to embrace some players from the 1970s who were perhaps overshadowed by the likes of Julius Erving, George Gervin, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Although White’s accomplishments in the game have always been greatly appreciated in Boston, it has taken years for others to recognize his career as more than just above average.

“I’m just excited and I loved playing sports,” White said. “To touch the athletes you’ve played with, coaches that you had to deal with, and you find you’re getting very, very close to the team that you’re working with. What I’ve went through as a player, I’m just excited.

“I’m still rejoicing from where I’ve gone to where I am to what I had to go through to get where I am. I’ve gone through it.”

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No. 4: Is Bradley Beal worth the max? — The Washington Wizards will have to figure out an answer to that question soon enough. A maxed out backcourt tandem of All-Star point guard John Wall and the sweet-shooting Beal could be on the horizon for a team with grand designs of climbing the ladder in the Eastern Conference in the coming seasons. Moke Hamilton of Basketball Insiders ponders the question a full summer ahead of time:

In all likelihood, Beal, whom the Wizards can make a restricted free agent next summer, will command a maximum offer sheet from some team at that time. Quite a few teams will have truckloads of cap space and can have a Brinks truck arrive at the residence of Beal at 12:01 a.m. on July 1, 2016. Until that time, though, since the Wizards will have the right of first refusal, it makes sense for them to wait—just like the Warriors did with Green, just like the Chicago Bulls did with Jimmy Butler and just like the San Antonio Spurs did with Kawhi Leonard.

Make no mistake about it, though, Beal is a maximum player in today’s NBA. That is true despite the fact that he has never played as many as 75 games in any one of his three seasons. It is also true despite the defensive ineptitude that he has shown on a fairly consistent basis over the course of his young career. And yes, it is true despite the fact that he has not consistently shown that he can impact the game on multiple fronts. Above all, he is regarded as a strong offensive player and a deadly three-point shooter (his career three-point conversation rate is about 42 percent). His ability to create his own shot has improved tremendously, and, still at just 22 years old, he is nowhere near his physical prime. As he ages and matures, he will only get better.

Indeed, in today’s NBA, contract impasses are nothing extraordinary. But as it relates to Beal, with his upside, his production thus far and the influx of money that the NBA will see over the next few years, even a blind man can see that this movie ends the same way as the ones we have just witnessed.

In Washington, D.C. or elsewhere, Beal is a maximum player. Drawing that conclusion is the easy part. The difficult part, for the Wizards, is determining whether or not he will fulfill the lofty expectations that such a contract would yield and whether they want to be the team to roll the dice on him.

But best believe, in today’s NBA, someone will.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Jahlil Okafor is ready to tote the load for the Philadelphia 76ers … The players had a huge hand in the look and design of the Hawks’ new uniformsKyle Lowry chats about his summer slim downDwyane Wade was in attendance for one of the craziest games on college football’s kickoff weekend

ICYMI: The Sixers have good reason to be excited about Nerlens Noel:


VIDEO: Nerlens Noel’s Top 10 Plays from his All-Rookie first team season

Morning shootaround — Sept. 4


VIDEO: Day Four Wrap: 2015 FIBA Americas Championship

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Morris ready to leave Phoenix | Beal, Wizards still not close on extension | Heat could have hard time keeping Whiteside | Prokhorov to buy rest of Nets, Barclays

No. 1: Morris ready to leave Phoenix — It’s been a few weeks since Markieff Morris said that he wouldn’t be in Phoenix much longer, possibly traded by the start of training camp. The Suns have stood pat since then, but Morris hasn’t backed down. On Thursday night, he reiterated his stance on twitter…

Morris’ contract extension (four years, $32 million) kicks in this season. The Suns traded his brother Marcus to Detroit in July, when they were looking to clear cap space for free agents. They added Tyson Chandler, but struck out on LaMarcus Aldridge.

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No. 2: Beal, Wizards still not close on extensionAnthony Davis and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, the No. 1 and No. 2 picks of the 2012 Draft, have signed contract extensions that have them under contract through the 2020-21 and ’19-20 seasons, respectively. There are still almost two months for ’12 draftees to sign extensions, but one might not get done for No. 3 pick Bradley Beal if he’s looking for the max (about $120 million over five years), because the Wizards will want to maintain flexibility for next summer, when a certain D.C. native will be a free agent. J. Michael of CSN has the latest on where Beal and the Wizards stand…

While talks remain open, CSNmidatlantic.com was told, there hasn’t been any movement. Beal, who believes he’s worth a max deal, just returned from Taiwan and president Ernie Grunfeld had been on vacation.

The lack of reaching a compromise isn’t an indication of any greater problems, but the Wizards aren’t in a position in which they must commit to a four-year deal fully guaranteed right now with so many moving parts ahead in free agency in the summer of 2016.

If a move is going to be made, it appears it would have to come from Beal to make a deal happen.

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No. 3: Heat could have hard time keeping WhitesideThe Miami Heat have changed the terms of Hassan Whiteside‘s contract, which now gives him a fully guaranteed $981,348 salary for 2014-15, rather than partial guarantees until Dec. 1. If Whiteside continues to play as well as he did at times last season, that 981K is a bargain. But a strong season for Whiteside could make it difficult for the Heat to retain him next summer, as the South Florida Sun Sentinel’s Ira Winderman explains…

The change of the 2015-16 terms does not ease the Heat’s tenuous status with Whiteside going forward.

With Whiteside to fall short of full Bird Rights due to only a two-year tenure with the team, the Heat still will have to create salary-cap space to re-sign him next summer. The only way for the Heat to go over the 2016-17 salary cap to re-sign Whiteside would be if he would sign for the average salary as part of his Early Bird Rights, a figure of less than $10 million, one expected to be far below his market value.

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No. 4: Prokhorov to buy rest of Nets, Barclays — Earlier this year, there were stories that Mikhail Prokhorov could be selling his share of the Brooklyn Nets. Now, Prokhorov is on the brink of going all-in on both the Nets and their arena, as the New York Post reports…

Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov is nearing a deal to buy all of the Barclays Center and the Brooklyn Nets from Bruce Ratner’s Forest City Enterprises, The Post has learned.

Prokhorov has been in talks to buy the 55 percent of the arena and 20 percent of the NBA team he does not already own. Under the deal being discussed, he would kick in little cash beyond forgiving the roughly $31 million Forest City owes him to cover team losses, according to two sources familiar with the situation.

Mitch Abramson of the New York Daily News says there’s still issues to be addressed before the deal is done

But, according to three high-ranking officials with both the Nets, Prokhorov and Forest City, the deal with Forest City Enterprise isn’t close to completion and won’t be done for perhaps another month.

“I don’t see this deal getting done probably for maybe the better part of three to four weeks,” one source told the Daily News. “There’s just a lot of issues that remain before we’re even close to being a done deal. It’s a complicated deal and it just takes time. But nothing is imminent.”

The source did say that both Prokhorov and Forest City are “motivated” to reach an agreement and the likelihood was still good the transaction happens.

But the deal won’t occur before a Sept. 8 deadline set by Prokhorov’s private investment firm, Onexim Group, for Forest City to pay back $6 million in debt, the sources all agreed.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: LeBron James is helping adults get their GEDsDante Exum had surgery to repair his torn ACL on Thursday … Free agent Landry Fields had hip surgeryKyle Lowry talks weight loss … and Rick Carlisle is a pilot.

ICYMI: Some ankle-breaking highlights from last season:


VIDEO: Top 60 crossovers of ’14-15

Morning shootaround — Aug. 5


VIDEO: Dante Exum’s best plays from 2014-15 season

Report: Exum may have torn ACL | Report: Wall to attend Team USA mini-camp | Teams face difficult extension decisions

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Report: Exum may have torn ACL — The Utah Jazz finished the 2014-15 season fairly strong, going 19-10 after the All-Star break (after a 19-34 start) and improved by 13 wins from the 2013-14 season. The team’s top rookie, guard Dante Exum, struggled in his debut campaign but showed some defensive prowess during Utah’s late-season surge. All that together means the Jazz have big hopes for Exum and the team in 2015-16 … and Tuesday’s news may deal a big blow to those hopes. Exum injured his left knee while playing for the Australian national team in a friendly game. Worst yet, writes Jody Genessy of the Deseret News, is word that Exum may have torn his ACL: 

The Australian point guard injured his left knee Tuesday while playing for the Boomers in an international friendly game against Slovenia.

Initial concern is that Exum might have torn the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, a source told the Deseret News.

Exum will return to Utah for further evaluation on his knee by the team’s doctors at the University of Utah Health Care, the Jazz announced shortly after the injury occurred on the other side of the world.

If the injury is an ACL tear, surgery would be required and Exum would possibly miss the entire 2015-16 season while rehabilitating his knee.

It isn’t known when Exum will arrive in Utah or how soon he will be evaluated.

Exum, who didn’t miss any of Utah’s 82 games as a rookie, was injured while driving into the lane against Slovenia in Australia’s final game of a European tour. The point guard planted awkwardly with his left foot and his knee buckled inward as he attempted to jump for a shot attempt, forcing him to flail backwards in pain.

Barring a trade or a late free-agency signing, third-year playmaker Trey Burke would fill in as the Jazz’s starter if Exum has to miss time. Utah also has two other young point guards under contract in Brazil’s Raul Neto and summer league standout Bryce Cotton.

Utah drafted Boston College point guard Olivier Hanlan, but it’s uncertain if he’s going to sign with the team or perhaps play elsewhere as a stash player.

Shooting guard Alec Burks and small forward Gordon Hayward are also adept at running the Jazz offense.

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