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Posts Tagged ‘Bob Myers’

Morning shootaround — Sept. 23

NEWS OF THE MORNING

League, teams hoping to create social change | D’Antoni needs buy-in from Rockets | Lue’s hesitation was worth more than $25 million | Road back-to-backs most dangerous

No. 1: League, teams hoping to create social change — In the wake of more deaths of black men at the hands of police and protests in Charlotte, the NBA and the Player’s Association sent out a joint letter to players about plans to take action and promote social change. Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan released a statement calling for peace in the city. And talking with the media on Thursday, Golden State Warriors GM Bob Myers said that his team will put together a panel to discuss the issue. Connor Letourneau of the San Francisco Chronicle has the story…

As police-involved fatal shootings of black men continue to rock the nation and spark protests in cities and on playing fields, Myers recognizes that Golden State has a unique platform to create positive change.

But before players and coaches can be part of the solution, they must understand the issues. Myers and head coach Steve Kerr recently brainstormed ways to raise awareness of social injustices. Among the ideas is a panel of civic leaders, a list of names for which already has begun.

“We need to practice to play basketball,” Myers said. “But if one day, Steve walked in and said to (our players), ‘We’re not practicing today. We’re actually gonna go meet with these four people.’ That’s much more important and the players, we feel, will carry that with them.”

“What’s happening out in society, that’s not good,” Myers said. “It’s much more important than dribbling the basketball and making shots. What we’re going to try to do as an organization is take some opportunities to try to have these conversations.”

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No. 2: D’Antoni needs buy-in from Rockets — After a successful, five-year run in Phoenix, Mike D’Antoni had less-than-mediocre results in New York (where he went 121-167) and L.A. (67-87). Now D’Antoni is in Houston and as it does in every other NBA gym at this time of year, optimism abounds. The key for the Rockets, according to D’Antoni, is getting the players to buy in and believe in the system. Bleacher Report‘s Maurice Bobb spoke to the coach and Rockets GM Daryl Morey about their hopes for the season …

D’Antoni says he doesn’t think too much about his time in L.A. and New York, but he’s certainly aware of the main issues that plagued those locker rooms.

“I could never get the guys from the beginning to buy into the way we want to play,” D’Antoni told Bleacher Report. “We never got everybody going into the same direction. That was my fault. It happened. That’s in the past. This is a new team. Guys want to play the way we all want to play.”

Rockets general manager Daryl Morey is betting that a change of scenery is all D’Antoni needs to flourish again. To Morey, a career .650 winning percentage over five years in Phoenix speaks louder than the well-publicized flameouts in the NBA’s biggest markets.

“The players are improved under him, the teams have improved,” Morey told B/R. “After he’s left, the teams have done worse. We also have had a lot of success playing an uptempo, spread-floor style. Our players fit that, and having his level of experience and knowledge added to our personnel, which is already set up for his style of play, was a huge factor in us hiring him.”

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No. 3: Lue’s hesitation was worth more than $25 million — When the Cavs fired David Blatt with a 30-11 record in January, they didn’t want to just make Tyronn Lue an interim coach. They offered him a three-year contract. But Lue never signed it, and it wasn’t necessarily because he thought he could get more money if he won a championship. As Joe Vardon writes for Cleveland.com, Lue wanted to make sure the job was right for him. And his hesitation resulted in a much more lucrative deal after the Cavs won their first title…

Lue, 39, knew what he was getting into when he took over for David Blatt last January. He knew Blatt was fired (Lue was Blatt’s chief assistant) despite a 30-11 record and a trip to the 2015 Finals.

He knew of the heightened scrutiny and brighter lights that come with coaching a team led by James, whose every word is dissected by media and fans and who can set off a firestorm with a simple Tweet.

That’s why Lue, born in little Mexico, Missouri, never signed a three-year, $9.5 million contract he had verbally agreed to with the Cavs when they promoted him to take Blatt’s job.

It wasn’t so much that Lue was betting on himself, although the gamble paid off handsomely. He steered Cleveland to the largest comeback in Finals history to win the franchise’s first title, and thus earned an annual raise of more than $4 million.

Lue held off, he said, because “I wanted to make sure it was the “right fit.”

“Was I right for this job?” Lue said, rhetorically. “I hate being on TV, hate dealing with media on TV. All that stuff, I don’t like that. Being with LeBron, who draws all kinds of attention, I knew I was going to see myself on TV. I hate that. I like to fly under radar. I wanted to make sure the fit was right.”

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No. 4: Road back-to-backs most dangerous — ESPN‘s Tom Haberstroh has the numbers on the increased frequency of occasions where healthy players get a day off to rest, from 19 in 2012-13 to 146 last season. He also talks to professor Masaru Teramoto, who has done a study on injuries in the NBA…

In a study provided to ESPN.com that will be published publicly in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport later this month, Teramoto researched three seasons of NBA injury data, from 2012-13 through 2014-15, in an attempt to determine if certain aspects of the schedule — in particular, back-to-backs and travel — led to players getting injured in games.

What Teramoto found surprised him: Back-to-backs alone are not associated with greater instances of in-game injury, but back-to-backs that are played on the road are significant predictors of in-game injury, generating 3.5 times the injury rate as those played at home.

The problem? Two out of every three back-to-backs are on the road.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Paul Millsap has a knee issue that will keep him sidelined for the next few weeksThe Kings have questions at point guard … Grizzlies.com caught up with a few of the team’s key players to get an update on their recovery from last season’s injuriesDorell Wright is going to camp with the Clippers … and Jason Terry doesn’t think Klay Thompson is in James Harden‘s league.

Morning shootaround — Sept. 21

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Curry not himself during Finals | Kevin Love on being Westbrook’s college teammate | Giannis now cornerstone of Bucks

No. 1: Curry not himself during Finals – Anyone who saw Stephen Curry during the regular season, when he won his second straight MVP (and did so unanimously), and during the last month of the playoffs knew that he wasn’t 100 percent. That’s not to offer an excuse — remember, the Cavs didn’t have Kyrie Irving for all but one game during the 2015 Finals — but it was the sad reality for the Warriors and their franchise guard. Curry says he still hasn’t gotten over Game 7, and discussed that and more with Sam Amick of USA Today:

From here until the end of his Hall of Fame-bound career, the piece of film that likely will haunt him most is the NBA Finals Game 7 loss against the Cleveland Cavaliers. Say what you will about all of the factors that weren’t in their favor — Curry’s right knee injury that slowed him until the end, the Andrew Bogut absence in the last two games because of a knee injury, the Draymond Green suspension in Game 5 that led to a series-turning loss — the championship was theirs for the taking again.

The fact that Curry missed 13 of 19 shots, including 10 of 14 from three-point range, when it mattered most only made the offseason worse. He finished with 17 points, two assists and four turnovers in the finale.

“I still haven’t gotten over Game 7,” Curry told USA TODAY Sports during a break in the shoot. “That’s something that will stay with me pretty much forever, for good and bad reasons. Obviously you hated the feeling, but it’s also a motivator to come back even stronger and try not to have that feeling again.

“I’m at that point now where I can try to fuel any kind of terrible nightmares or thoughts about Game 7 into motivation for how I’m going to prepare myself for this year.”

And therein lies the saving grace for Curry and the new-look Warriors: they’ll be the cause of night terrors for the rest of the NBA soon enough.

If there were a cure for this kind of hoops hangover, the arrival of Kevin Durant should have been it. Less than two weeks after the Game 7 loss, not long after Curry and a band of other Warriors players, coaches and executives recruited the former Oklahoma City Thunder star in a Hamptons mansion, the Warriors got the word that the biggest fish in the free agency was coming their way. But Curry’s recovery was far too complicated for that to be the quick fix.

Those first few days were the roughest of them all, he admits, especially for someone who has always taken such pride in not letting his work life affect him at home. The Cavs had made history at Oracle Arena, becoming the first team in league history to recover from a 3-1 Finals deficit to win it all while winning two of the final three games on the road. LeBron James, who many believed had lost his unofficial title as the game’s best player to Curry before he re-seized that status, had celebrated in their halls as if he owned the place.

Even the smiles of Curry’s two young daughters, Riley and Ryan, and the support of his wife, Ayesha, couldn’t soothe that initial sting. Ditto for the golf outings with President Obama, the late-night talk-show appearances and the annual trip to China with Under Armour that were to come.

“Starting with that night (of Game 7), it kind of was like a surreal feeling at home, kind of like, ‘What just happened?’ because we were so confident we could get it done,” Curry said. “Human nature kind of took in, where I was a little down — kind of naturally. But I was able to kind of just get away, go on vacation with the family (in Hawaii), get in front of the next generation at a couple (basketball) camps, still be around the game but not be depressed at all and understand we’re playing for the Finals and hopefully get another chance at it next year.”

In a way, it’s apropos that the Warriors lost the what-if way. A year before, it was the Cavs who were left with questions regarding injuries: What if Kyrie Irving hadn’t broken his kneecap in Game 1, or if Kevin Love’s dislocated shoulder hadn’t ended his season in the first round against the Boston Celtics? This time, it was the Warriors’ turn to wonder what might have been.

Brandon Payne, Curry’s personal trainer who is based in his hometown of Charlotte but trains with him in the San Francisco Bay Area, had a front-row seat.

“The first day I saw him after (Game 7), we both just had a moment of, ‘Well that really sucked,’ ” Payne said. “But after that, we haven’t really talked about it. We just moved forward.

“It’s one of those things where we know it happened, right? We don’t have to (watch the tape). We know what happened, and we have a pretty good handle on why it happened. We’ll just focus on getting him ready for 82 games (next season).”

But not before Curry would rest in a way that spoke volumes about his health.

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Morning shootaround — Sept. 2

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Myers expecting ‘turbulence’ in 2016-17 | Report: Seraphin, Pacers agree to deal | Blazers to workout again in San Diego

No. 1: Warriors GM Myers expects ‘turbulence’ in 2016-17 — As the defending NBA champions, the Golden State Warriors were the team everyone wanted to beat last season. But, the Warriors followed up their title-winning season by racking up an NBA-record 73 wins. Golden State, of course, made the biggest move of the offseason in adding Kevin Durant and will once again be a top target for a win on just about every team’s list. In an interview with KNBR’s Murph & Mac on Wednesday, GM Bob Myers expects his squad to face plenty of challenges in 2016-17:

“I think a lot of people think we signed Durant and everything is great, which in reality, that is a really good thing. But we have a lot of new parts. This is not a team like last year’s team, where we could just hit training camp in stride. As much as we like our roster, it’s gonna take some time to evolve with guys like Durant, David West, [Zaza] Pachulia. We lost six guys. So even though we’re happy with the offseason, I do think we’re gonna have some turbulence. Because the other thing is, I think the scrutiny on the team is gonna be so high that any loss, anything that happens in a negative way, is gonna be exaggerated, right? It’s just gonna be, ‘I can’t believe they lost a home game,’ or ‘I can’t believe they lost two in a row, they never did that last year.’ I mean, last year I think we started out 24-0 or something crazy. So if we start out, whatever we start out, it’s not gonna be that, I imagine. So people might write or say, ‘Oh, they’re not as good as last year. […]

“It takes time to develop chemistry. And that doesn’t happen in one day or one week or one month. It’s exciting. I think it’s gonna be a great process to watch unfold. But I do think because of the expectation level, probably the highest expectation you can ever put certainly on a Warriors team — even though I think a lot of people thought we would win the championship last year, I think people now are even having higher expectations. When you have that level of expectation, that’s where you want to be as an organization, but it also magnifies any adversity or any stretch of losing. So it’s good, it’s fine, but you have to be aware of it, and not be shocked when it comes.”

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Blogtable: Do Warriors have a short window to contend?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on Team USA in 2020? | Do Warriors have a short window to contend? |
Who benefits more from change in scenery: Al Horford or Dwight Howard?


> David Robinson says the Golden State Warriors “have a short window” to win titles. Agree? Disagree?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comThose comments were odd, coming from a guy whose favorite franchise has kept its championship window open for the better part of two decades. Maybe Robinson’s point was that San Antonio is one of those exceptions that proves the rule (though I’ve never quite understood that aphorism). Yes, it’s rare that a team could back up a Hall of Fame player such as Robinson with an even greater one in Tim Duncan — but hasn’t Golden State essentially done that with Kevin Durant coming aboard to help Stephen Curry? To me, setting aside career-altering injuries, it comes down to how you define “team” vs. “franchise.” Teams do have compact life cycles, and pieces come and go more swiftly than ever in this era of shorter contracts.

Replenishing with invaluable role players such as Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston will be the Warriors’ next big challenge, after caulking up the gaps opened this summer. Then again, Golden State figures to be a free-agent destination for a while, with the momentum of the short term and a sparkling new arena carrying them all forward. If Warriors GM Bob Myers & Co. can master the art of roster-and-talent transitioning, there’s no reason the Warriors’ ambitions can’t match the length of Curry’s career and beyond.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: I’m not sure which window “The Admiral” is looking through, but barring major injury to a key player, the Warriors are in the championship conversation for the next five years. In today’s NBA, that’s an eternity.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: If he considers five or six years a short window. But if Robinson is thinking two or three years, he is way off. It’s hard to dissect the semantics. It is not hard to see the Warriors being very good until the current core is in its 30s.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Well, what’s “short?” Two years? Four? Or less? It’s hard to put a cap on their title chances because of unknown factors that can work for or against them: Injuries, defections, etc. No team can rip off eight straight titles anymore as the Boston Celtics once did. Something similar to the Shaquille O’NealKobe Bryant Lakers would be considered reasonable if, again, the Warriors are fortunate enough to escape injury.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Disagree. When the season begins, Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant will be 28, while Draymond Green and Klay Thompson will be 26. So they’re basically the same ages as Chris Bosh (26), LeBron James (25) and Dwyane Wade (28) when they started their first season together in Miami. That group went to four straight Finals and could have gone to more if James didn’t leave and Bosh wasn’t dealing with a non-age-related health issue. At 34, Wade showed us that he can still come up big in the playoffs. So I see the Warriors’ having at least five more years (in addition to the two they’ve already had) as a championship contender, as long as GM Bob Myers and coach Steve Kerr keep those guys happy.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: David Robinson doesn’t need me or anyone else to remind him that championship windows are only open as long as the superstars on a roster stay healthy and together. So I’ll assume that “The Admiral” is speaking code when he says the Warriors’ window is short, as in at least three to five years with their current core group. The days of a dynasty the likes of which Robinson helped start along with Tim Duncan in San Antonio is no longer feasible, not with the way superstars are willing to change teams these days. In this new NBA world, five years of competing at the highest level is anything but short.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: It’s absolutely true in the sense that the Warriors have to play as if the window is short. If they don’t win the championship in the first year or two, then it may be hard to keep the team together amid the criticism that is sure to follow. Will changes in the salary cap rules of the next collective bargaining agreement make it difficult to carry huge contracts for their four stars and fill out the roster with qualified role players? These days no team can count on a long run: Look at Oklahoma City, which had only three years of young Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and James Harden before changes were made.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogWait, what exactly is a short window? Is that something like an overweight door? Anyway, who am I to disagree with “The Admiral?” I will say this, though: I don’t know how long the Warriors’ window will be open, but I do believe the pressure to win starts right this second. No adjustment period will be given, despite any common sense required. These guys will be expected to show what they can do right away.

Morning shootaround — April 26

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Injuries derail Clippers’ playoff path | Durant: Cuban ‘an idiot’ for Westbrook comments | How bad is Curry’s injury? | Lakers hope to find new coach quickly

No. 1: Injuries derail Clippers’ playoff hopes — A healthy roster is often what stands between success or failure during the regular season and the same is true — perhaps even moreso — come playoff time. The Los Angeles Clippers entered last night’s Game 4 in Portland with hopes of returning to L.A. with a 3-1 series edge and, of course, a fully healthy roster. By evening’s end, they had neither. Star point guard Chris Paul suffered a broken hand in the third quarter and star forward Blake Griffin left the game early due to an issue with his troublesome left quadriceps. Our Scott Howard-Cooper was on hand for the game and has more on the state of L.A. after its many losses:

Chris Paul knew.

The way he sat on the bench, the way he stared into some far-away place as emotions appeared to ricochet around his brain, a mix of disbelief and disgust on his face, he could tell even before the short walk to the visitor’s locker room that the season had just turned in a staggering way.

Paul was leaning back in the chair midway through the third quarter Monday night, his left arm draped over the top of the adjacent chair, a relaxed position while his mood was anything but. It’s like he couldn’t believe how everything had gone so wrong so fast. Then, when CP3 did stand up and walk to the locker room to confirm the bad news, he didn’t get more than a few steps before lashing out in frustration with his right leg, kicking what appeared to be a cushion on the floor in front of the Clippers bench.

There was not any attempt to hide the emotions because they would be impossible to bottle up, not from Paul as he left the court in uniform for what may have been the final time this season and not from teammates as they dressed afterward in near silence for the charter flight back to Los Angeles and the new series against the Trail Blazers. The Clippers had been rocked Monday night at Moda Center and there was no way to deny it.

Paul was gone, the victim of a fractured right hand in as he tried to slow Gerald Henderson driving to the basket in the third quarter, an injury that could sideline him weeks, although the Clippers will wait for another evaluation Tuesday before putting a timeline on his return. And Blake Griffin may be gone, at least temporarily, with coach Doc Rivers saying Griffin is 50-50 for Game 5 in Los Angeles after re-injuring the quadriceps tendon in his left leg, the injury that cost him much of the regular season.

The chances of a long playoff run would have been reduced to a microscopic number without Paul, only now the Clippers have to come together in a big way just to get out of the first round while getting worked over by the likes of Mason Plumlee (21 rebounds and nine assists in Game 3, followed by 14 boards and 10 assists in Game 4), Al-Farouq Aminu (30 points and 10 rebounds in Game 4) and Ed Davis (12 rebounds in Game 4).

L.A. doesn’t just have the health issues, after all. L.A. has the health issues mixed with a pressing opponent issue, a resilient Trail Blazers team that spent the regular season upending expectations. The Blazers have now charged back into the series and they enter Game 5 with the momentum and a real opportunity to do more than scare the Clips.

 …

“We have to take a very collective approach,” guard J.J. Redick said. “Everybody has to do a little more. We’ve been in this situation before. We played for a lot of stretches without Blake this year. I’m not saying he’s going to be out, but he’s obviously feeling something in his quad. And three years ago we had to play for a long stretch without Chris. Last year in the playoffs, the first two games in Houston we had to play without Chris. So we’ve done this before. It’s just got to be a collective effort.”

Starting right away.

“There’s no shellshock,” Doc Rivers said. “What it is is they love their players, their teammates, and Chris is taking this very hard. He’s worked all year to get back to the playoffs and for this to happen to him, he’s an emotional guy and so I think our guys, it’s a neat family and it’s things you don’t ever see, like you guys will never see, but it was a nice thing in the locker room. Everybody, the whole team, is in the locker room and it’s nice in that way. But the reality is that you don’t have Chris Paul.”

And, according to ESPN.com’s J.A. Adande, the prognosis for Paul is looking grim. Adande reports that Paul is ‘done’ for the playoffs:

“He’s done.”

Two different people with the same two words on the same subject: Chris Paul.

It appears the broken bone in his right hand will keep Paul out for the rest of the playoffs. What does that mean? Well, if we’ve learned from this postseason, it’s that we don’t know what anything means. The terms are too subject to change.

Last year, the Clippers split two playoff road games that they played without Paul. But that was with Griffin playing at a superstar level. Now Griffin can’t even guarantee he’ll play at all in Game 5 in Los Angeles on Wednesday.

“I’m not sure,” Griffin said. “Tomorrow, I think we’ll take a better look and hopefully go from there.”

Asking Griffin to reproduce his 26 points, 14 rebounds and 13 assists from Game 1 of last year’s Rockets series is probably asking too much. Asking him to match his 19-12-6 line from Game 1 of this series with Portland could be a stretch. On Monday night, he tried to take off the way he used to, when he dunked on people with reckless abandon. He got fouled by Mason Plumlee, didn’t come anywhere close to throwing the ball through the hoop and soon found himself rubbing his quadriceps on the sideline and even heading back to the locker room to get checked out. He returned to the game, but his gait was noticeably affected.

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Morning shootaround — April 22


VIDEO: Highlights from Thursday’s games

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Curry didn’t decide to miss Game 3 alone | Rockets’ front office gets vocal on social media | Why Wizards are hiring Brooks | Kings interview Mitchell

No. 1: Warriors decided collectively to rest Curry for Game 3 — Reigning Kia MVP Stephen Curry has been itching to get back in the Golden State Warriors’ lineup ever since he tweaked his right ankle in Game 1 of the team’s first-round series. He hadn’t done so leading up to last night’s Game 3 in Houston and while he likely hoped to play then, he ultimately sat out on Thursday, too. Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that the decision to sit Curry was not made in a vacuum but rather in consultation with several Warriors officials:

Stephen Curry did not play Thursday night in Game 3, but only after prolonged conversation and contemplation among Warriors officials.

This time, Curry made his case to play. His much-scrutinized right ankle felt better than it did Monday night, when he cut short his pregame warm-up routine and essentially decided on his own he would not play in Game 2.

This time, Curry wanted to give it a shot. He went through Thursday morning’s shootaround, and afterward he spent several minutes talking to team trainers and team doctor Bill Maloney on the court at Toyota Center.

Head coach Steve Kerr and general manager Bob Myers joined a subsequent discussion, and a consensus emerged to give Curry at least two more days to recover.

Kerr said the ankle improved from Wednesday to Thursday. The decision was made by Kerr, Myers, Maloney and the training staff, with input from Curry.

“We made a collaborative decision,” Myers said. “Everyone had a voice, including Steph. The fact he hasn’t done much live work in practice, it’s hard to know what he can do in game situations.”

The decision means Curry will have seven full days between games. He injured the ankle Saturday in Game 1; now he hopes to return Sunday for Game 4.

Asked about his outlook for Curry on Sunday, Myers said, “I’m hopeful. Hopefully, he’ll have an opportunity to do a little more (the next two days) than he’s done.”

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Kerr: “Not worth risk” to play Curry

HOUSTON — Stephen Curry has won most of his battles on the basketball court over the past few seasons, but he lost the debate with the Warriors staff about playing in Friday night’s Game 3 against the Rockets. His sprained right ankle is improving, but not enough to get him back into the lineup.

“We talked to him after shootaround today and he felt pretty good,” said Warriors coach Steve Kerr. “He moved well. He wanted to play. But ultimately we didn’t feel comfortable after four straight days of inactivity throwing him into the middle of a playoff game not knowing how the ankle was going to respond.

“His thought was he would be OK. We just felt a lot more comfortable putting him through 3-on-3 tomorrow, probably a 5-on-5 on Saturday and really seeing if he’s OK or not.

“It wasn’t worth the risk if we put him out there tonight and he re-injured it. It’s too big of a risk. So we’ll see what happens the next couple of days and hopefully he’ll be ready to go for Game 4.”

It was a group consisting of team orthopedist Dr. William J. Maloney, the training staff, general manager Bob Myers, Kerr and Curry that arrived at the consensus despite evidence that the ankle had improved.

“We kind of teamed up on him,” Kerr said. “He wanted to play. But he’s also very practical and he understands the thinking and he understands that it’s better safe than sorry.

“It was a very easy decision. Weighing the pluses and minuses, a very easy decision.”

As for Game 4 on Sunday?

“We’re hoping,” Kerr said. “The biggest thing for him is to play 3-on-3 tomorrow at our practice and see how he feels after that. Again, without having done anything for four days, no conditioning, no rhythm, no actual live contact, it would have been irresponsible, I think, to put him out there.”

Report: Warriors ‘significant’ threat to sign Kevin Durant this summer

HANG TIME BIG CITY — The summer of 2016 has been looked forward to for a while by teams around the NBA. Not only will many teams around the league be flush with spending money thanks to a new television deal, but at least one marquee player will be a free agent: Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant.

While Durant, the 2014 NBA MVP, has stayed mum on his future plans, that hasn’t stopped media speculation. And a new report today from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo’s The Vertical suggests that if Durant does choose to leave Oklahoma City this summer, the leading contender to sign Durant could conceivably create something of a basketball monster.

Writes Wojnarowski

The Golden State Warriors’ plan of pursuit predates their 2015 championship run, a bold plot to declare the futility of resistance. It isn’t only that the NBA champions are determined to recruit Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant. The truth is that they’re the most intriguing destination to him. If Durant leaves the Thunder, the Warriors are the significant frontrunners to sign him, league sources told The Vertical.

The Warriors already have everything and yet they’re threatening to take more now. Steph Curry. Klay Thompson. Draymond Green. Committed ownership. Bob Myers, the executive of the year. Steve Kerr, a championship coach. Yes, Golden State has everything, including the ability to create the salary-cap space and a belief that Durant’s persona could fit seamlessly – even onto a potential two-time defending champion.

Make no mistake: Durant isn’t close to gone in Oklahoma City – no decision, no leaning, sources said – but the real threats on the summer market are beginning to reveal themselves. Durant is determined to win – to be an immediate championship contender at 27 years old – and that keeps bringing him back to the Warriors should he make the decision to leave Oklahoma City.

Outside of a Thunder championship closing down the process before July 1, there’s a strong expectation that Durant will hit the road, tour campuses and become a recruit again.

The big free agents, they’re forever living one of two things in the months leading into summer: searching for reasons to stay, or searching for reasons to leave. Durant has always been looking for reasons to stay. He adores the Oklahoma City community and holds a fondness for the franchise, but Durant is chasing championships, chasing a legacy.

Morning shootaround — Jan. 24


VIDEO: The Fast Break — Jan. 23

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Cavs lose in Lue debut | Stan Van Gundy rips Blatt firing | Kerr, Myers find support in pain | Scola the Explorer

No. 1: Cavs lose in Lue debut Just hours after replacing David Blatt as coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers, Tyronn Lue made his head coaching debut at home in a nationally televised game against the Chicago Bulls. And while Lue talked about wanting to make the experience more fun for his players, as Chris Haynes writes for Cleveland.com, that turned out to be easier to talk about than actually make happen, as the Bulls won 96-83…

The Cavaliers showed energy, but lacked any efficiency — showing no shooting touch on the floor or at the foul line. They missed beyond the arc — making just four of 24 attempts — and at the foul line, where they were 9-of-22. By game’s end, they left the floor to boos from the home crowd.

During Lue’s pregame presser, he said one of the problems was that his team needed to start having more fun post David Blatt.

“I don’t think they’re enjoying it,” Lue said. “That was a part of our speech today. The game will pass you by. No matter how great LeBron is, Kyrie, Kevin, the game will pass you by. … I want them to just enjoy the moment now.”

To help cater to a new pleasurable basketball experience, before the game the Cavaliers did something they haven’t done since mid-November: they participated in the starting lineup introductions. Before, the players would just stand in a huddle as the public address announcer announced each starter.

That was the full degree of Cleveland’s (30-12) fun.

Initially into the contest, it looked as if the Cavaliers were energized and full of life by jumping out to a 7-2 lead. But that vigor slowly evaporated and old habits of isolation ball crept back in. They went scoreless in the final 6:26 of the opening quarter, missing their last 16 shots.

Ball movement could have been better, but for the most part Cleveland just couldn’t hit a shot. It was brutal to watch as they shot a horrific 37 percent from the field for the night.

When the buzzer sounded for halftime and the Cavaliers were down five, a frustrated LeBron James slammed the ball to the floor as he headed to the locker room. He had missed all three of his first half free throws. By game’s end, the Cavaliers were 9-of-22 from the charity stripe — and that required an 8-for-11 stretch to finish the game. Chicago capitalized on those missed opportunities, expanding its lead to 17 with 42 seconds remaining in the third.

An exasperated sellout crowd booed the home team, which trimmed the deficit to nine on a James layup plus free throw with 2:55 left in the game. A pair of free throws by Smith chipped it to eight seconds later.

But the Bulls found Taj Gibson for a difficult layup with a foul on James, pretty much ending any suspense. There was no overcoming that margin on this cold shooting night.

James was an assist shy of claiming his his first triple-double of the season. He finished with 26 points and 13 rebounds, but was 11-for-27 shooting. Smith put in 18 points on 17 shots. Love was the only player to make half his shots, finishing with 14 points and five boards and Kyrie Irving registered 11 points on 16 shot attempts.

Lue informed the media at morning shootaround that he would go with a 10-man rotation in order to develop an identity with the second unit. Veteran James Jones, who was out of the rotation under Blatt, was the first to sub in. Mo Williams, who hadn’t played in 10 of his last 13 games, soon after entered. The surprising aspect is that Lue used 10 players in the first quarter, showing how serious he is about improving his bench.

The results didn’t prove beneficial. Chicago’s bench outscored Cleveland’s 22-8.

With the franchise invested in Lue for the long haul, his objective is still to win games, but he also wants to restore his team’s passion.

“I’m not really worried about, right now this early, about the games, I really just worried about the spirit is more important than anything,” he said. “Getting our spirit right, getting our spirit together and I think everything else will take care of itself because we got a lot of great players.”

***

(more…)

Morning shootaround — December 11



VIDEO: All the highlights from Thursday’s four games

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Thompson says ankle is 70 percent
Don’t count the Splash Brothers out from making a full appearance tonight when the streaking Warriors play the Celtics in Boston. Klay Thompson tells Ethan Sherwood Strauss of ESPN.com that the sprained ankle suffered in Tuesday’s win over the Pacers is at “70 percent” and he’ll be a game-time decision:

“It’s not feeling great, but it’s not feeling bad,” Thompson said after Thursday’s practice at Emerson College in Boston. “It’s like somewhere in between. It’s like 60 percent — nah, 70.”

Thompson, who finished with a season-high 39 points against the Pacers, was walking under his own power with a bit of a limp after the game, though the team said X-rays were negative. He has been rehabbing the injury since.

“He’s obviously out there getting some shots up, shooting around, but it’ll likely be a game-time decision [against Boston],” Warriors interim head coach Luke Walton said. “If there’s any concern at all that his ankle’s hurt, then we’re not going to play him.”

When asked for his prognosis, Thompson said: “I’m optimistic about life and Friday. And, yeah I’m optimistic. I think if I have a good shootaround [on Friday], I’ll play.”

***

No. 2: Irving, Shumpert could be ready
With LeBron James’ minutes back up and Cleveland working extra hard to hold onto that top spot in the Eastern Conference standings, the Cavaliers could definitely use a boost to their lineup. That help could come very soon as Kyrie Irving and Iman Shumpert might both be ready to play on the two-game road trip to Orlando and Boston. That’s the word from Chris Fedor of cleveland.com:

“There’s a chance that one or two or both will play on the trip, but there’s also a chance they don’t,” head coach David Blatt said Thursday. “We’ll see how they’re feeling.”

Both Irving and Shumpert went through a full practice on Thursday, the final workout before the team left for Orlando, and both made the trip.

“It’s a day-to-day thing with both of them,” Blatt said. “We kind of like to let them get through the practice then the next morning gauge how they’re feeling. And then just go from there.”

***

No. 3: Warriors still chasing Spurs
The defending champs might be the ones with the rings, the perfect record and the No. 1 ranking in the standings. But Warriors general manager Bob Myers says his club is still looking up to the Spurs as the gold standard in the NBA. Myers expressed his admiration for what coach Gregg Popovich and the Spurs have built to Sam Amick of USA Today:

“They are a model franchise,” Myers told USA TODAY Sports on Thursday. “We are all trying to emulate them.”

Yet this is not a classic case of one rival spewing politically correct platitudes about another. Myers, who made a seamless transition from NBA agent to executive after being hired as Golden State’s assistant general manager in April of 2011, keeps a poignant quote from Spurs coach Gregg Popovich saved on his cell phone as a reminder of how great sports organizations should be built. From Warriors owner Joe Lacob to Myers on down, the Warriors have been taking plays out of the Spurs’ proverbial playbook for years now.

“A synergy has to form between the owner, whoever his president is, whoever the GM is, whoever the coach is,” Popovich said in that quote from March of 2014 that Myers kept as a blueprint of sorts. “There’s got to be a synergy where there’s a trust. There (are) no walls. There is no territory. Everything is discussed. Everything is fair game. Criticism is welcome, and when you have that, then you have a hell of an organization. That free flow through all those people is what really makes it work. And that includes everything from draft to Os and Xs. Nothing should be left to one area – only to the president, only to the GM, only to the coach – or the culture just doesn’t form. At least that’s what’s worked for us.”

***

No. 4: Gibson says Griffin meant no harm
It is no surprise that Blake Griffin didn’t think he deserved a flagrant foul for taking a swipe that caught Taj Gibson in the head on Thursday night. But count the victim Gibson as just as shocked that Griffin was penalized and ejected, according to Dan Woike of the Orange County Register:

“Man, I’m old school. It’s basketball,” Gibson said before saying he was surprised Griffin got tossed. “You’re going to get hit. First thing as soon as it happened, he reached down to make sure I was OK. I’ve known Blake for a long time – great guy. Even after he got ejected, he was making sure I was OK. It’s no big thing. It’s basketball. But that’s how our league is now so you have to respect the referee.”

Griffin, who was ejected in the Clippers’ last nationally televised Thursday game against Phoenix, said he got caught in the air after Gibson pump-faked.

“I thought he was going up so I tried to swipe across the ball. Obviously I missed,” Griffin said. “ … I wasn’t trying to hit him in the face. There wasn’t intent to hurt or intent to really hit him. I was trying to get the ball and he pump-faked me.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The NBA says it is “premature” to talk about Luke Walton coaching the West team in the 2016 All-Star Game…Mask?  Derrick Rose didn’t need a stinking’ mask in the second half against the Clippers..Mark Cuban wants refs to make more defensive 3 seconds calls…Sixers deny talk of sale…Mark Jackson says it’s too early to talk about Kristaps Porzingis as an All-Star…Jordan Clarkson is looking at getting a big raise from the Lakers next summer.


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