Posts Tagged ‘Board of Governors’

Morning shootaround — Oct. 24

VIDEO: Top plays from Friday’s preseason action


‘Big Thaw’ behind Popovich/Team USA pick | Rose Bullish on Hoiberg offense | Barnes calls out media ‘half truth’ | Holdout over, Thompson happy, healthy, wealthy

No. 1: ‘Big Thaw’ behind Popovich/Team USA pick — Just because Gregg Popovich was an obvious choice to take over as the next head coach of Team USA doesn’t mean he was an easy choice. Popovich’s NBA resume, built on his belief in international players and basketball as a universal language, and his global inclinations dating back to the Air Force Academy made him the logical successor to Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski, as our own Fran Blinebury explained. But there was a back story to Friday’s announcement involving the San Antonio coach and Jerry Colangelo, chairman of USA Basketball, that played out over a decade before the tumblers all fell into place. Adrian Wojnarowksi of Yahoo! Sports pulled back the curtain:

Just over a year ago in Chicago, Gregg Popovich raised the question with commissioner Adam Silver at the annual NBA coaches meeting: How did the USA Basketball national coaching job turn into a lifetime appointment for a college coach?

“Isn’t an NBA coach good enough to coach NBA players?” is one of the queries to Silver that peers in the room remembered Pop asking of the commissioner.

Pop offered several candidates, including Doc Rivers, as deserving of a chance to coach the Olympic team. All around Pop, NBA head coaches nodded with agreement. Popovich never offered his own name, though.

Popovich had once wanted the job, but would never campaign now – and truthfully never thought it possible as long as Jerry Colangelo was running USA Basketball.

Popovich and Colangelo had a decade-long cold war that started to thaw with a telephone call in March, league sources told Yahoo Sports on Friday. Colangelo finally reached out to Popovich to measure his interest in replacing Krzyzewski as the national coach in 2017. There would be no process, no competition. Pop had earned the right, but the question he and Colangelo had to answer, as one source with knowledge of the process said, “Could they work together?”

As those around Colangelo and Popovich understood, these two men had never had the opportunity to get to know each other, and maybe that was worth exploring before fully abandoning the idea of Popovich for the job. Popovich’s relationship with Adam Silver is much stronger than his with Stern, much more trust exists there. That helped, too.

Truth be told, how could Silver and Colangelo explain passing on Popovich again? They couldn’t – and Popovich needed to come to the conversations also with an open mind.


No. 2: Rose bullish on Hoiberg offense — There’s no pinning down Chicago’s Derrick Rose when it comes to his injuries. Sometimes when folks, even his own team, expect him to return in a timely fashion, his rehab and recovery require more time, occasionally a lot more time. And then, when he is said to still have double vision as a result of a left orbital fracture suffered in the Bulls’ first practice of training camp, he manages to play anyway. Rose got on the court for 11 minutes against Dallas in Chicago’s preseason finale, darted to the rim for three layups and was effusive about the pace and potential of the team’s offense as coached by newcomer Fred Hoiberg. Sam Smith of chronicled the results from Lincoln, Neb.:

And it looks very promising for Rose to open the season where the Bulls expected him to be, at point guard leading a dynamic attack.

“I don’t want to say,” Rose said with a smile about the opener against Cleveland Tuesday. “I don’t want to jinx myself, but it’s improving every day. It looks like it’s a go for me.”
Beep, beep; get ready for the road runners.

“I felt good,” Rose said. “I just wanted to come out, get a feel for the offense. I loved the way coach designed everything, the way the offense is run. They’ve got me running down hill every time I catch the ball and I’m catching the ball with a live dribble.

“He asked me to play yesterday,” said Rose of Hoiberg. “For him to ask me it must mean he loved the way I was playing in practice. With this offense it’s a lot of openings and gaps. With the way we shoot the ball and the freedom we have to shoot the ball, it’s like you can’t help off anyone; if someone has it going we’re to keep feeding them. We’re going to play off matchups. We’ve got to do that a little bit more and get people the ball a little more, like when Jimmy [Butler] had a couple of post ups when he had [J.J.] Barea on him a couple of times and we missed him. That’s all about reading the game and reading who is out there, giving the ball to the right person.

“There are a lot more (driving) lanes,” enthused Rose. “It’s so many opportunities to drive or so many opportunities to shoot my mid range even in transition; it’s open. I’ve just got to get used to playing this way. I know that might sound crazy, but playing in a (deliberate) system for three or four years kind of got me out of my rhythm.”


No. 3: Barnes calls out media ‘half truth’Matt Barnes is one of the NBA’s reigning bad boys, in a league in which villains and heels are hard to find compared to 20 or 30 years ago. His dust-up with New York Knicks coach Derek Fisher out in Los Angeles – the result of Barnes’ angry reaction when Fisher visited socially Barnes’ estranged wife – generated unsavory headlines. And Barnes didn’t mince words this week when he talked with our own Shaun Powell about his departure from the L.A. Clippers, among other things. But Barnes had a right to take umbrage with a Web site,, that spun his quotes second-hand and then spit them out in a headline more spiteful and controversial than what the veteran NBA forward actually said. So Barnes cut out the media middle men and made his case, in all its raw emotion, directly through Instagram:

matt_barnes9 I guess I shouldn’t be surprised anymore when my interviews or events in my life are taken & twisted up to make me look like an [expletive]!

So this recent article about me “hating Doc Rivers” is no different… I did say “Doc & I never saw eye to eye”,which was the truth & I also said “he couldn’t wait to get me outta there” which was the truth.. But I also said theres “No Hard Feelings” this is a BUSINESS & Doc did wat he felt was necessary to better his team! Not one time did I say “I hate Doc or the Clippers organization”..It’s actually the opposite!! I have nothing but gratitude & appreciation for the franchise that I had a “small part” in help turning around! I did say “I can’t wait to play the Clippers & Doc Rivers” because I am a competitor & even tho I love my former clip teammates, when that ball goes up Nov 9th for that next 48mins we are enemies!!

It’s just funny how EVERYTHING that comes out about me is half the truth or $h!t none of the truth..! The few people in the media that try & paint this negative picture of me you are doing a good job, “hats off to you” but my friends family & teammates know me & the truth & I guess that’ll have to do! “Just like I drove 95miles from Santa Barbra to LA” lol smh


No. 4: Holdout over, Thompson happy, healthy, wealthyTristan Thompson isn’t sure how fans around the NBA or even just in Cleveland will respond when they see him for the first time since his contract holdout ended Thursday. But if there are enough bankers, financial planners and professional negotiators in the stands, the Cavaliers’ backup power forward ought to hear plenty of cheering. Thompson and his agents Rich Paul and Mark Termini gambled and won big, scoring a fully guaranteed, five-year contract worth $82 million, because a) Thompson performed so well in the Cavs’ playoffs crisis, stepping into the void opened by Kevin Love‘s shoulder, and b) the restricted free agent and his reps didn’t blink when the league’s artificial deadline for reaching a new deal passed on Oct. 1. Here is some info from Chris Haynes of on how Thompson made a three-week holdout work for him:

His patience paid off, and it wasn’t just tested over the summer. It started about a year ago when his agents Rich Paul and Mark Termini turned down a four-year, $50 million extension in October of 2014, NEOMG was told. It is believed that the figure Paul would have settled for at the time was north of that $50 million sum.

An extra year of duty in a backup capacity (behind Kevin Love) while averaging the lowest statistics since his rookie year somehow translated to Thompson locking up $32 million more.

Last year the Phoenix Suns gave the Morris twins, Markieff and Marcus, a four-year $52 million extension to split between the two. Markieff, the better player, collected $32 million. Thompson picked up Markieff’s entire salary in the span of 12 months.

The news of Thompson’s deal prompted Sacramento Kings star DeMarcus Cousins to Tweet out: “How much?”

You think Thompson has any reservations to the sequence of events that led to his massive contract?
“If you asked if I would do it again, I’ll tell you I would do it again in a heartbeat,” Thompson told NEOMG. “Business is business and I believed in my guys Rich and Mark and myself and that’s what I did.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Cleveland coach David Blatt apparently doesn’t doubt for a second that LeBron James will be healthy and available for the team’s season opener Tuesday in Chicago. But James hasn’t practiced for a week since receiving an anti-inflammatory injection in his lower back, his second in 10 months. … Ten weeks after beginning his own fight with cancer, Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell has been given a clean bill of health. He talked about that battle with reporters and disclosed that he had spoken with Timberwolves coach Flip Saunders, whose own treatment for Hodgkins lymphoma has been more difficult. … NBA commissioner Adam Silver talked after the Board of Governors meetings about the potential, at least, of a peaceful path to the owners’ next labor contract with the players and how shared business concepts might contribute to that. … When Doc Rivers calls Paul Pierce slow, he means it as a compliment. … Miami’s Gerald Green cost himself $25,000 in a matter of seconds with some unwelcome firearm pantomimes. … Meanwhile, Memphis’ Jeff Green committed the faux pas of third-person self-referencing. …

Ads on game uniforms a crucial topic on Board of Governors’ agenda

NEW YORK – The city that’s home to some of the priciest rental properties in the world has been the site this week for some NBA discussions on square-footage rates that dwarf even the most tony Park Avenue addresses.

How does $3 million to $5 million for 2.5 square inches sound?

The league’s Board of Governors reportedly was talking about the use of adverstisers’ logos on game jerseys at its annual October meeting. The topic dates back several years, with the NBA studying the economics of such a move as far back as 2012.

That’s when Kiki Vandeweghe – now the NBA’s executive vice-president of basketball operations, then working under president Rod Thorn – penned a piece for the Wall Street Journal noting that advertising is common internationally on soccer jerseys and, of course, on NASCAR cars and fire suits. The WNBA has featured ads and logos on uniform tops for years.

Details – sizes, prices, navigating conflicts with other corporate partnerships and more – were just starting to be explored when Vandeweghe wrote in his defense of the strategy:

It’s time Jerry West, the Hall of Famer widely regarded as the inspiration of the NBA’s logo, got some company on league jerseys. And it’s time for fans to recognize that, no matter how much they view their favorite teams as public trusts, those teams are businesses first.


Besides, the quality of the game on the court wouldn’t change one iota. Would the uniform look better without it? Slightly. But the NBA hasn’t grown to a global icon by ignoring revenue possibilities.

That last thought might figure into questions NBA commissioner Adam Silver is expected to field at the conclusion of the Board’s meetings Friday on daily fantasy Web sites. Silver recently spoke with about the league’s equity stake in FanDuel, with the commissioner saying he still sees such gaming sites as a legitimate and lucrative revenue stream and supports federal regulation of the industry.

The owners also were expected to hear reports from the financial and competition committees, along with reviewing the recent collective-bargaining agreement with the NBA’s referees.

NBA gives go-ahead to playoff changes; teams now seeded according to record

VIDEO: NBA announces playoff seeding changes

The NBA announced new rules for playoff seeding that includes ranking the top eight teams in each conference strictly in order of best record, essentially making winning a division title little more than a ceremonial distinction.

Previously, each division champion had been guaranteed no worse than No. 4 in its respective conference, regardless of record. Under the guidelines announced Tuesday following a unanimous vote by the Board of Governors and a 30-0 decision from the Competition Committee, winning a division will only matter in the postseason picture as a secondary tiebreaker that may rarely be required.

A division winner used to be awarded home-court advantage if it met a non-division winner with the same record in the playoffs, although the division winner would not have home-court advantage if it was facing an opponent with a better regular-season mark. Now, the outcome of the regular-season series is the first tiebreaker for seeding and home court. Being a division winner was the second tiebreaker.

The changes are effective immediately.


Moratorium: more talk, no change at Board of Governors session?

VIDEO: Commissioner Adam Silver on all things NBA

LAS VEGAS – Declaring a moratorium on talk about the NBA’s moratorium — that newly controversial period during which teams and free agents can negotiate and sorta, kinda, maybe commit (but not really) to each other — would be futile.

As hot as that topic is in the week following DeAndre Jordan‘s shock-the-world, or at least rock-the-NBA, change of heart about leaving the Los Angeles Clippers for the Dallas Mavericks, debate about the system is certain to rage for a while longer.

And even though the moratorium wasn’t a formal agenda item for the Board of Governors meeting here Tuesday, does anyone think it’s really possible to get Dallas owner Mark Cuban, Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and 28 of their closest rivals in one room without the topic at least being broached?

As aggravating, as convulsive, as Jordan’s Re-Decision might have been to Cuban, Mavericks fans and folks who focus on matters (squishy ones in these times) of honor and “word,” it’s important to understand the why’s and wherefore’s of the moratorium system. Our own David Aldridge laid it out in his Morning Tip this week, and NBA commissioner Adam Silver spoke to its pros and cons during an NBA TV interview from Summer League.

“I will say it’s an imperfect system, there’s no question about it,” Silver said. “The question is, ‘Is there a better system?’ And that’s something that the league office, and in discussion with our owners, we’re always looking to do things better. … [It] also is part of our collective bargaining agreement as well. So even if we say, ‘Yeah, here’s a better way of doing it,’ we can’t unilaterally change it. It has to be changed through a collective bargaining process.”

The moratorium next offseason already is on the books to last three days longer than this year’s, with actual signings delayed until July 12. While the CBA-governed structure might not change, it’s possible teams, agents and players will alter their tactics or at least their verbiage within it.

Among other topics that were expected to come up at the BOG:

  • A report from the Competition Committee that met Monday. Perhaps the most newsworthy discussion will focus on playoff seeding. Eliminating the claim on the top spots of division winners — something Silver has favored — is a possible outcome. Also, there has been talk about permitting the basketball to be advanced in late-game or late-period situations without requiring a timeout.
  • Reports from the league’s business committees are on the agenda. Also expected: discussion of the arena situations in Sacramento and Milwaukee. The Wisconsin legislature is scheduled to vote Wednesday on the latest public-funding plan to subsidize the Milwaukee Bucks’ $250 million private commitment, with the team urging a 2015 ground-breaking.

HGH testing, added in NBA/union joint effort, among topics at Board of Govs

NEW YORK – The agenda items at the NBA Board of Governors meeting Thursday and Friday pales, on the excitement scale, next to the start of the league’s 2015 playoffs this weekend. A lot of business-as-usual is on the table, including updates on the potential sale of the Atlanta Hawks and arena developments in Milwaukee, San Francisco and Sacramento.

But one topic sure to generate conversation when NBA commissioner Adam Silver meets with reporters Friday afternoon was the joint announcement by the league and the National Basketball Players Association that blood testing for human growth hormone (HGH) would be added to the anti-drug program starting with next season.

As far back as the 2011 lockout, during the protracted collective bargaining talks, the union and the owners agreed to a process for determining how HGH blood testing would be implemented. That process hit a snag, however – first former commissioner David Stern and then Silver explained that the NBPA’s search for an executive director to replace Billy Hunter precluded further progress on the matter.

With Michele Roberts‘ hiring as NBPA chief in July, however, the work resumed.

Under the plan announced Thursday, beginning with the start of 2015 NBA training camps, all NBA players will be subject to three random, unannounced HGH tests annually (two in-season, one off-season). Players also will be subject to reasonable-cause testing for HGH.

Any player who tests positive would be suspended for 20 games for his first violation and 45 games after his second. A third violation would result in the player being dismissed and disqualified from the NBA.

Among other BOG business, the owners will see a presentation on expansion efforts into youth basketball. Competition-related topics such as scheduling improvements, conference alignment and playoff qualification also was likely to be discussed. Silver has gone on record as wanting to eliminate as many “four in five nights” scheduling challenges as possible to ease players’ workloads, possibly reduce injuries and provide for better competition between more-rested participants.

After the annual spring meeting Friday, the NBA will conduct its tiebreaking process to determine teams’ orders heading toward the May 19 draft lottery.

Lottery reform now a perception game

VIDEO: Silver on draft lottery reform

Commissioner Adam Silver got it partly right in noting the perception problem with the lottery, about how losing teams feel pressure from fans “to somehow underperform” to get the best picks in June and accelerate the elevator ride back up. That is definitely an issue. (Not as much as a weak owner and front office that would make basketball decisions based on public opinion, but, yes, a problem.)

What no one seemed to hit on, though, as the Board of Governors voted down dramatic changes to the lottery Wednesday was how the proposal was exactly about perception. It was about soothing, not fixing.

The system isn’t flawed because of tanking. The system is flawed because the team with the worst record does not get the No. 1 pick, and rarely does the second-worst move into that coveted position. Since the change to the current format, the club with the best odds has drawn the winning combination of ping-pong balls three times in 21 lotteries: the 76ers in 1996 (Allen Iverson), the Cavaliers in 2003 (LeBron James) and the Magic in 2004 (Dwight Howard). The next-best odds has moved to the top of the draft once in the 2000s, the Clippers of 2009 (Blake Griffin).

The suggested solution that went before the Board of Governors? Decrease the chances even more.

The proposal got 17 of 30 votes from the Board of Governors, one representative from each franchise, at a meeting in New York, short of the 23 needed for approval. The plan goes back for further review and likely tweaks within the competition committee.

The obvious intent was to discourage tanking — no need to try for losses, the teams were being told, because there is not a good chance it will get you to the top of the order anyway. Which was known anyway. It’s right there in the history books.

Tanking was one of the most oversold storylines of last season, if not the most, without nearly the race to the bottom too many would suggest. The 15-67 Bucks had the worst record in the league, but after making moves in the offseason to get better, not set themselves up for June. The 19-63 76ers — OK, apart from them. The Jazz had the worst record in the West, but improved after the first month or so, when a 1-14 start provided the perfect opportunity to cash out early. The Lakers were second worst, though obviously not out of preference. The Kings could have kept the roster in place, but traded for Rudy Gay in a win-now move.

The league went from years of no proposals moving to a final vote, and rarely so much as a public suggestion from one of the teams about fixing the problem, to possibly ratifying a jolting set of rules. There was such a whiplash effect that it may have been one of the reasons the new idea failed to gain the necessary two-thirds approval. While the need to deal with the image problem of tanking was obvious, with Philadelphia the current poster child, the result would have been to further penalize the teams that earned the spot through more-conventional means.

“I think we all recognize that we need to find the right balance between creating the appropriate incentives on one hand for teams to, of course, win, and on the other hand allowing what is appropriate rebuilding and a draft to work as a draft should, in which the worst performing teams get the highest picks in the draft, and we’ve tinkered with the draft lottery several times over the years,” Silver said. “I don’t necessarily disagree with the way it works now.”

He added: “I’d say from a personal standpoint, what I’m most concerned about is the perception out there right now. Frankly the pressure on a lot of our teams, even from their very fans, to somehow underperform because it’s in some people’s view the most efficient and quickest way to get better, so I think that’s a corrosive perception out there. Whether it’s the case, I’m frankly not sure. I think sometimes perception becomes reality in this league. There seems to be a certain group-think among general managers in terms of what the best ways are to build teams, and so it was a fascinating discussion [surrounding the vote] and I think a very appropriate discussion for the board.”

There are no shortage of suggestions to remedy the lottery dilemma. The proposal that got voted down just wasn’t one of them.

BOG vote down Draft lottery reforms

VIDEO: Commissioner Silver discusses the owners’ vote

NEW YORK – Dealing with ultra-competitive people who’ve chased down success in both sports and business, vying in an industry with millions and these days even billions of dollars at stake in revenue and franchise valuations, it’s no wonder that every NBA rule on and off the court gets bent nearly to the point of breaking.

So dialing in the right mix of incentives, disincentives and weighted percentages in crafting or reforming a draft lottery is like dribbling through the Chicago Bulls defense – in a minefield of unintended consequences. Veer this way and … kaboom!

That, ultimately, was why a proposal from the league’s Competition Committee to modify the lottery failed to pass at the Board of Governors meeting that concluded Wednesday in midtown Manhattan. A 17-13 vote in favor of some significant changes still fell short of the 23 votes needed, based on the league’s by-laws. The issue goes back to the committee for further study.

“We’ve tinkered with the draft lottery several times,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said. “I don’t necessarily disagree with the way it works now. I’m concerned with the perception.”

Silver, in fact, considers it a “corrosive perception” held by some fans, media types and people within his own league that teams can win big by losing big.

The essence of a draft is to deliver the best young talent to the neediest team. Yet “neediest team” is a moving target: Sometimes it’s a good team whose star player has gone done for a season – or left for good as a free agent. Sometimes it’s a chronically mismanaged roster full of players who never quite panned out. And still other times it’s a crew in need of serious rebuild whose front office has determined that “tanking” in search of a high draft pick is the surest way out of Stinkville.

The Philadelphia 76ers are the current poster guys for that strategy, using lottery picks on injured Joel Embiid and Euro-stashed Dario Saric one year after adding hurt-and-redshirted Nerlens Noel and finishing 19-63. Other teams such as Milwaukee and Orlando lined up with them – the 15-67 Bucks actually undercut the field in 2013-14 – in pursuit of the same prize.

The sense that one or several of the league’s 30 teams would take the court intending to do anything but win is one that rankles Silver. But for every tweak in the lottery system allegedly keeping teams honest in one direction, there was potential for a different club to game the system in another.

“Whether it’s the case, I’m frankly not sure. Sometimes perception becomes reality,” Silver said. “I think there’s an unfair pressure on some of our teams to actually underperform. There’s a view in those markets that they’re better off performing poorly in order to win in the long-term.”

Teams voted for or against the lottery reforms for other, more specific reasons. Some franchises in small-revenue markets feel they’re at a disadvantage in free agency (luring players) or trades (keeping acquired players long-term. They see the draft – and the rules of rookie contracts that can stretch as long as five seasons, at salaries lower than market value – as an equalizer. Teams in larger markets, with greater pressure from their fan bases to win, may view the draft as rewarding the league’s laggards or, worse, the intentionally bad.

According to Yahoo! Sports, the votes broke somewhat, but not entirely, along market-size lines. The 13 “no” votes reportedly were: Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Antonio, Washington and Utah.

The proposals floated this week called for broadening the lottery’s sweet spot and giving more teams a better shot at landing the top picks. In flattening the odds among the teams with the four worst records, the “neediest” team’s chance at the No. 1 pick would have been cut from 25 percent to 12. Also, it would be guaranteed no worse than the seventh pick, rather than fourth in the current system, if its lottery numbers proved unlucky.

“People want a change,” one Eastern Conference GM told, “but they weren’t happy with the proposal.”

Other topics addressed at the Board of Governors meeting included:

  • Reports on revenue sharing and the new TV and digital rights extensions with Turner Broadcasting and ABC/ESPN that will pay the NBA $24 billion over nine years beginning in 2016-17, approximately triple what the current deals generate.
  • Discussion about the league’s latest marketing campaign and the status of the Atlanta Hawks’ unsettled ownership situation.
  • Presentations on domestic violence, diversity and other workplace concerns.
  • The extension of Minnesota owner Glen Taylor’s term as Board of Governors chairman for one more year.
  • The establishment of the David J. Stern Sports Scholarship, a $30,000 package based on merit and need for a student in sports management. Included: an internship at the NBA office in New York as a junior and direct mentoring from Stern, who retired as NBA commissioner after 30 years in February. “He was honored, flattered,” Silver said. He’s looking forward to engaging directly with these young students.”

The TV money issue looms large over the next two years because, while the infusion of cash won’t occur until 2016-17, all parties know that it is coming. NBA players already have talked about getting back some of what they felt was sacrificed in the last round of collective-bargaining talks in 2011, when their share of league revenues fell from 57 to approximately 50 percent. Owners reportedly are questioning revenue-sharing arrangements agreed to at about that same time and fine-tuned since.

Silver said Wednesday that one-third of the league’s 30 teams still are not profitable, though he added after the news conference that the onus still is on the individual teams to manage well their business. Some in attendance raised the specter of labor strife again in 2017 when the current CBA can (and likely will) be re-opened, and the possibility of a lockout similar to or worse than 2011 in a squabble over the flood of dollars.

The commissioner wasn’t ready to go there.

“So many great things are happening in this league right now,” Silver said. “Putting money aside, I think the system elements are working in the new collective bargaining agreement. I can’t remember a time when we had so many competitive teams in the league, so much hope in markets throughout the league.

“As I’ve said to the players, from day one when I became commissioner, my focus is on growing the pie. And if we do our job growing the pie, the incremental differences in percentages will be rounding error compared to us both sharing in the success of the league.”

VIDEO: Silver breaks down the new media deals

Lottery reforms fail to gain support

NEW YORK – There’s still a 75 percent chance the worst team in the NBA won’t get to draft the best player available in the annual June Draft.

The status quo isn’t likely to erase “tanking” from the NBA vocabulary, however.

Nor might it placate those seeking even longer odds for the team, or teams, that head to the bottom of the standings as if it was a mini-tramp, hoping to propel themselves into contention faster by being bad rather than just mediocre.

But it will have to do for now, because changes in the draft lottery system that were expected by many insiders to be approved Wednesday fell short in a vote at the league’s Board of Governors meeting.

Reports by both Yahoo! Sports and cited a 17-13 vote in favor of the lottery reforms, but 23 votes were needed for them to pass. Much of the debate broke along small-revenue and big-revenue markets, though preliminary reports of the voting suggested that some franchises crossed market-size lines.

Among the changes considered, the team with the worst record would see its shot at the top pick cut approximately in half (12 percent), with other teams’ improving, and the worst team could have dropped all the way to seventh (rather than fourth under the current system).

Some small-market teams, who already feel at a disadvantage in free agency and in trading (and keeping) players, apparently are wary of changes in the draft system that might hurt their access to top young talent on rookie contracts. An Eastern Conference GM told that while changes might be welcome, a number of teams were “not happy” with the specifics voted on Wednesday.

Defined In Times Of NBA Tumult, Stern Stepping Down In Tranquility


NEW YORK – The news of the day surprised few, if they had been following along: Starting in June, the NBA Finals will revert to the 2-2-1-1-1 schedule format currently used in all earlier playoff rounds and for The Finals prior to 1985.

In a nutshell, the reasons for 2-3-2 –- commercial air travel by the teams and catering to newspapers’ travel budgets — no longer are issues for the league, allowing competitive considerations about proper home-court advantage to carry the day. At the Board of Governors meeting that wrapped up in New York Wednesday afternoon, the unanimous recommendation of the competition committee from September was unanimously approved by the NBA’s owners/team reps.

The backstory of it all, though, was more compelling –- this was commissioner David Stern‘s last scheduled Board of Governors session, his last post-BOG news conference. Aside from the closed-door, collective bargaining bloodlettings in which Stern most famously rolled up his sleeves, earned his paychecks and made his bones, these meetings of the 30 team owners ranked a close second in crafting Stern’s reputation across 30 years as NBA commissioner and consummate cat herder. (His bi-annual pressers at The Finals and All-Star weekend placed third, offering glimpses of his many moods and styles to the fans.)

But for his finale, it seemed rather tranquil. For a man whose vision and will shaped the NBA over the past three decades like no others, and whose professional highlight/lowlight reel necessarily would be crammed with lockout moments, talk of “enormous consequences,” subtle verbal jabs and occasional fits of pique, the low-profile business that wrapped Wednesday was awfully tame.

“It is, right?” Stern said as he stepped from the platform, playing along momentarily with the “lightning rod” reputation one wag laid on him during questions and answers. Even Stern knows his best (and worst, equally memorable) moments have come during times of the NBA’s greatest turmoil. But this simply isn’t one of those times.

Business is good. Labor peace prevails at least until 2017. San Antonio’s Peter Holt will continue as BOG chairman. Reports at the BOG from revenue-sharing and collective-bargaining committees were encouraging, as Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver described them. Arena development or renovations are said to be on track in Sacramento, Minnesota, Milwaukee and New York’s Madison Square Garden. And two dozen or more franchises are on track to be profitable by the end of 2014-15, Stern said, assuming they want to be.

“There are some teams who will not be profitable, in many cases because they choose not to by virtue of their payments to either players or coaches or general managers,” he said. “We’re getting to a point that with revenue sharing, teams that are improving their performance will break even or make money, except for those that are ‑‑ I haven’t looked at the Nets’ balance sheet, but my guess is that they’re going to not necessarily be profitable.  But that also involves large payments to build a building as well as large salary, as well as large [luxury] tax payments. But that’s OK.”

The meetings Tuesday and Wednesday might have been as much about Stern’s fast-approaching retirement as the Finals format or other league matters. He’ will step down Feb. 1, 2014, after precisely 30 years, the longest run of any commissioner in the four major U.S. pro sports. Pressed only a little, Stern shared some of what went on.

“Oh, there was a very warm reception last night at dinner at which some speechifying was accomplished,” he said, “and a series of totally embarrassing photos of me over the last 36 years, and a very heartwarming video that was voiced in part by … Bill Russell, Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan, Larry Bird, Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant, and LeBron James. It was pretty neat.

“It was a little bit over the top. There used to be a joke that said ‘My father would have enjoyed it, my mom would have believed it.’ It fell into that category. But it was very nice.

“I got the opportunity to thank my colleagues at the NBA for their incredible work and saying how pleased I was that the league was in such good hands under those colleagues and Adam’s stewardship.”

Silver will take over as commissioner on Feb. 1, a move that has been ratified and contractually set for the past year. No formal baton hand-off has been scheduled, but All-Star Weekend Feb. 14-16 in New Orleans will be two weeks too late.

At the close midday Wednesday, Stern said, a resolution was read into the meeting’s minutes. “[It] was also very warm and thanking me for my job done in the success of the league,” Stern said. “That provided the basis for me to quickly bang the gavel down on the meeting, and my last words were ‘Lunch is served.’ ”

The kudos and plaudits will come rolling in over the final three months or so of Stern’s tenure. He has another victory lap or three in him, beginning with Miami’s championship ring presentation on opening night Tuesday, followed by a trip to Sacramento and the franchise that was saved for that city on his watch.

“The game is in good shape. We came off a great season,” Stern said. “Our teams are going to have record season-ticket sales, renewals are strong, sponsorships are up, gate is going to be up. Everything coming off a very strong base is going to be up this season.  Seems like a really good time to do something else.”

Stern has been Silver’s biggest booster to the owners and in the media, assuring them of a smooth transition. Silver orchestrated a little payback Wednesday, commissioning a David J. Stern bobblehead to give to the owners and team reps. Cleveland’s Dan Gilbert later did an interview in which he joked that the Stern doll only shakes its head side-to-side, rather than nodding yes.

Stern told that story on himself, as relaxed and tranquil as he’s ever been in his job.

“Believe it or not, even including my interaction with the media and the burns I [have] from being a lightning rod, it’s been a great run,” the commissioner said, “and I’m grateful to the owners for giving me the opportunity.”

From 2-3-2 to 2-2-1-1-1

Rod Thorn, NBA President, Basketball Operations, recalled Wednesday a Finals turnaround in which the Celtics and the Lakers played on a Friday, flew from Los Angeles to Boston on Saturday, then played a matinee game at Boston Garden. With that in mind, the NBA will schedule an extra day off between Games 6 and 7 in June, if the 2014 Finals go that long.

No determination has been made yet on turnaround time for subsequent championship series, Stern and Silver said, or for the travel gaps between other games in the series. A Finals that goes seven games will require four airline flights between Game 2 and the finale, rather than the current two, but teams these days fly exclusively on charter flights.

Also, the competition committee felt that facing three consecutive road games (Games 3-5) was unfair to the team that earned home-court advantage, as was spending a full week on the road at that point in the postseason. Silver was said to have urged the owners to approve the change, citing basketball reasons over the business reasons that triggered the 2-3-2 approach. They approved it without dissent.

Interestingly, the teams with Games 1, 2, 6 and 7 at home (if needed) won 21 of the 29 Finals (.724) played under 2-3-2, compared to a 26-12 mark (.684) for the 38 NBA/BAA championships through 1984.

“I think there is a sense that it skews the competition, but it’s not backed up by the data,” Silver said. “The likelihood of a team winning in a 2‑3‑2 format of the favored team is the same as in the 2‑2‑1‑1‑1 format.  But there certainly was a perception … that it was unfair to the team that had the better record that it was then playing the pivotal Game 5 on the road.”

Owners’ Meeting Vote Might See Stern Take 2-3-2 Finals Format Into Retirement


When NBA commissioner David Stern packs up his office at the end of his 30-year term Feb. 1, the cardboard box he totes out of Manhattan’s Olympic Tower might have something besides the expected papers, photos and mementos. It might include the 2-3-2 Finals format he helped usher in so long ago.

In the last scheduled Board of Governors meeting of Stern’s tenure, the competition committee’s unanimous recommendation to switch back to a 2-2-1-1-1 home/road schedule of games will be voted on Wednesday in New York. If approved, the switch likely would be made beginning with the 2014 Finals in June, has learned.

A desire to align the NBA’s championship series with the format of its other postseason rounds (all 2-2-1-1-1), and questions about the 2-3-2’s effect on home-court advantage have been driving discussion of the change. Stern – who took over as commissioner on Feb. 1, 1984 – presided over the Finals-only switch that began in 1985. But air travel snags and fatigues prevalent when teams flew commercially have been alleviated by luxury charter flights.

Both Stern and his presumptive replacement, deputy commissioner Adam Silver, in recent months have expressed interest in the old format. The dynamic of the team with alleged home-court advantage losing one of the Finals’ first two games and then potentially not getting another home game has been cited as one issue. Others see the inordinate amount of pressure on the team hosting Games 3, 4 and 5 – better not lose! – as an alternative bit of unfairness.

For the record, the teams with Games 1, 2, 6 and 7 at home (if needed) have won 21 of the 29 Finals (.724), compared to a 26-12 mark (.684) for the 38 NBA/BAA championships through 1984.

Among other business at the BOG meetings Tuesday and Wednesday, representatives from Sacramento, Minnesota and Milwaukee were scheduled to brief their fellow owners and officials on arena developments in their markets.

The Kings are in the midst building a new facility, part of their push to stay in town rather than be relocated to Seattle. The Timberwolves have an agreement with Minneapolis for a $100 million renovation of Target Center. And the Bucks are seeking a deal with city and county authorities on the financing of a replacement for the BMO Harris Bradley Center.

The Milwaukee Journal reported Tuesday that team owner Herb Kohl, the retired U.S. senator who has delegated Bucks VP Ron Walter to handle recent BOG business, will attend and discuss the report.