Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Wiggins’

Blogtable: Most entertaining team to watch in 2015-16?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Top international newcomer? | Most entertaining team? | Too many preseason games?

VIDEOWho are the must-watch teams on League Pass in 2015-16?

> The ________ will be the most entertaining team to watch this season, and here’s why.

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Warriors. They already were, and they brought the band back together. Steph Curry spent the summer trying to become even more efficient, and dropped 40 on New Orleans in the opener. The second and third years in a new offense are when a truly smart and skilled team blossoms. Which means trouble for the other 29 teams.

Steve Aschburner, For the second straight season, the NBA’s most entertaining team probably will be its best team — the Golden State Warriors. A club like the Clippers might pack more personality and purists might find entertainment value in the care and nurturing of a young, developing crew such as Milwaukee or Orlando. Personally, I still get my kicks watching 40 percent of the Memphis Grizzlies – that is, big men Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol playing old-millennium ball in a 3-crazed NBA. But night in, night out, for pace and production and their undersized leader out top (Steph Curry), Golden State is sports’ DWTS.

Fran Blinebury, The defending-champion Golden State Warriors. Have we forgotten so quickly, the ball movement, the shot-making the versatility, the sheer beauty of the Warriors that practically begged for a musical score in the background?  Play it again, Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green and the rest.

Scott Howard-Cooper, The Warriors. I considered the Thunder because it’s Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook, Serge Ibaka joined by the uncertainty of a new coach, and that wonder of how Billy Donovan will work out adds to the good theater. But c’mon. Golden State is a fun watch anyway, and now the defending champs have the entire league chasing them … while hearing about how the title was luck … and firing back at doubters … with a coach who routinely dishes snark. That’s entrainment.

Shaun Powell, The Thunder. So much at play here, with Kevin Durant returning and seeking to restore his MVP glow, and how Russell Westbrook tries to top what he did the last three months of last season, and what Billy Donovan has in store for a system. Oh, and there’s also the backdrop of KD’s pending free agency. To me, entertainment means points and wins and showdown games against top competition, and OKC will hit that trifecta.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe Warriors are the easy answer, and the Thunder are a distant second. But in the Eastern Conference, the Washington Wizards could be Warriors Light. John Wall can’t shoot anything like Stephen Curry, but he’s one of the league’s best passers who will thrive with more space to operate. If Bradley Beal and Otto Porter can build on their postseason performances, this can be a pretty potent offense led by one of the league’s five best point guards.

Sekou Smith, The Clippers have all the ingredients you need to be the No. 1 reality TV show in basketball, both on and off the court. They’ll be the most interesting team to watch, as coach Doc Rivers tries to tinker with the chemistry of a championship-caliber group that has added three ridiculously strong personalities in Paul Pierce, Josh Smith and Lance Stephenson. This is still Chris Paul‘s team, but he might have to share the leadership load with others in ways that he has not been accustomed to recently. They’ll put on a show when they are at their high-flying best.

Ian Thomsen, The Clippers are going to be the edgiest and therefore most entertaining team. Their impatience will be their strength: Chris Paul and Blake Griffin are fed up with hearing about what they haven’t done, while DeAndre Jordan, Lance Stephenson and Josh Smith all want to be taken seriously. They are going to play with more attitude than any rival contender.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogHere’s the thing: Whichever team is the correct answer to this question is a team we aren’t talking about right now. Last season the Atlanta Hawks quickly evolved into a sweet passing tribute to Jogo Bonito, which transformed them into darlings of the basketball nerd set. And then there are the young teams that play entirely on spirit and fire with a style that may be unsustainable, but no less watchable. So I’ll take a guess and say a team that might be worth tuning in for, if healthy, will be the Minnesota Timberwolves. Between Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine performing nightly high-wire acts, Ricky Rubio splashing the ball around with abandon, and Kevin Garnett and Karl-Anthony Towns in the post, what’s not to like?

One Team, One Stat: No D in Minny

VIDEO: Schuhmann’s Advanced Stats: Minnesota Timberwolves’s John Schuhmann gets you ready for the 2015-16 season with a key stat for each team in the league and shows you why it matters. Today, we look at the Minnesota Timberwolves, who earned the No. 1 pick by playing the league’s worst defense.

The stat


The context

20151013_min_basicsShooting is the most important part of a good offense, and defending shots is the most important part of a good defense. The Wolves were the worst team at defending shots since the 3-point line was moved back (after three seasons at a uniform 22 feet) in 1997.

The Wolves’ defense ranked in the top 10 in opponent turnover rate and opponent free throw rate. But their success in those areas was trumped by how bad they were at keeping their opponents from missing shots…

… inside and on the perimeter. The Wolves ranked last in field goal percentage defense at the basket and 28th in 3-point defense.

To make things worse, Minnesota ranked last in defensive rebounding percentage. So when their opponents did miss shots, they allowed too many second chances.

Injuries, in particular to Ricky Rubio and Nikola Pekovic, were a factor. The Wolves allowed just 100.7 points per 100 possessions in 382 minutes with Rubio and Pekovic on the floor together. Kevin Garnett might have made an impact on defense when he was acquired in February, but played just five games after that.

This year’s Wolves are going to be fun to watch. Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins are special talents who are just just 19 and 20 years old, respectively. Both could be great defenders some day, too.

But the Wolves are probably going to struggle defensively again this season. In fact, through three preseason games, Wolves opponents have an effective field goal percentage of 57.9 percent.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Report: Bennett, Wolves agree to buyout

From staff reports

Roughly one year ago, the Minnesota Timberwolves picked up Anthony Bennett from the Cleveland Cavaliers as part of a mega-trade that netted them eventual Kia Rookie of the Year winner Andrew Wiggins for All-Star Kevin Love.

After a rough rookie season in Cleveland (4.2 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 35.6 FG pct in 52 games.), Bennett performed only slightly better in his sophomore NBA campaign (5.2 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 42.1 pct in 57 games). In short, Bennett’s days with the Timberwolves were not a success and, as was first reported yesterday by Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski, the team was looking to buy him out of his deal.

Well, that has come to pass, as Yahoo Sports Shams Charania reports via Twitter that the team and Bennett have reached an agreement on a buyout (and that the Portland Trail Blazers are an expected suitor for him):

Here’s more from Wojnarowski and Charania:

Anthony Bennett, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2013 NBA draft, has reached agreement on a contract buyout with the Minnesota Timberwolves, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Bennett has to clear waivers in the next 48 hours to become an unrestricted free agent. Four teams have the salary cap space or the trade exception necessary to absorb Bennett’s $5.8 million contract: the Cleveland Cavaliers, Philadelphia 76ers, Portland Trail Blazers and Utah Jazz.

Utah would need to waive a partially guaranteed contract to clear an additional $600,000 needed to claim Bennett. The Jazz have $5.2 million in salary cap space now.

His representatives are hopeful that no team claims him on waivers and that he will have the opportunity to pick his next destination as a free agent. Philadelphia and Portland plan to look carefully at the possibility of claiming Bennett, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Bennett played his best basketball as a pro for two Blazers coaches – Jay Triano and David Vanterpool – this summer on the Canadian national team, and undoubtedly Blazers general manager Neil Olshey will lean on his staff for intel on Bennett. Portland is still $13 million below the minimum salary threshold, which could factor into a possible decision to claim Bennett.


Morning shootaround — Sept. 13



Bryant ready to go ‘full bore’ | Love pencils return for mid-October | Seventies’ Celtics squeezed in acclaim | Tellem tells ’em in Detroit

No. 1: Bryant ready to go ‘full bore’ — While the Lakers still sort out whether they’re ready for World Peace (as in Metta, their former sturdy forward) at training camp, they fully expect to have back a player not known for his peace-making domestically or abroad: Kobe Bryant. The ultra-competitive Bryant – according to general manager Mitch Kupchak, in comments to USA Today – will be ready to go when camp opens in two weeks, with the L.A. team’s brass expecting to monitor how hard Bryant pushes himself or anyone else. Here’s an excerpt from the piece:

With so many young players on the Lakers roster who mean so much to their uncertain future, a veteran like World Peace could help in ways beyond the box score. A healthy-again Kobe Bryant will certainly lead the charge, as the future Hall of Famer is about to embark on his 20th – and likely last – season with the Lakers.
But as Kupchak noted, Bryant isn’t among the 10-plus players who have been working out this week at the team’s facility. After Bryant played a combined 41 games the past two seasons because of injuries – his last being the torn right rotator cuff that required surgery in January – the Lakers plan to bring him along slowly when the team holds training camp in Honolulu next month.

“My understanding is that he’ll be ready for camp,” said Kupchak, whose team has exhibition games scheduled at the University of Hawaii against the Utah Jazz on Oct. 4 and Oct. 6. “Knowing Kobe, he will try to participate in every practice in camp. But myself and (head coach) Byron (Scott) are going to have something to say about that. So I’m sure there will be a practice or two or three where we won’t let him practice, but I do expect him to be full bore at camp.”

As for World Peace, Kupchak talked about that potential comeback elsewhere in the story:

The 35-year-old World Peace last played in the NBA two seasons ago, when he logged 29 games for his hometown New York Knicks before playing in China and Italy thereafter. World Peace, who was a key part of the Lakers’ title team in 2010 and played four seasons for the Lakers in all, has been working out at the Lakers’ practice facility during the offseason and capturing Kupchak’s attention in the process.

“I love the guy,” Kupchak said. “I really do. Last year, he was in Europe, he was in China. (Then) he coached his daughter’s middle school or high school team to a championship. He was here to work out when he got back from Europe playing, and then he’d come in through the summer. He’s been coming in on a regular basis. I do know that he wants to play, and that’s where we are.

“We’ve got a couple more weeks (until training camp). Our roster’s not complete. And we’ll just take it from there. Nothing’s imminent in terms of a signing anytime soon, but it’s hard not to watch a guy when he’s in your gym every day going up and down the court, working with young guys, playing hard.”


No. 2: Love pencils return for mid-October — It wasn’t accompanied by any doom-and-gloom duh-Duh-DUH! sound clip and was, in fact, offered up rather matter-of-factly. But Cleveland forward Kevin Love did say he might be anywhere from four to six months away from returning to court action for the Cavaliers in his rehab from left shoulder surgery. That’s the definition of “month, month and a half,” which is the time frame Love offered up during his Friday night appearance on NBC’s Late Night With Seth Meyers show. While others can debate whether this is a big deal, a small deal or no deal at all – as fellow Cavs big man Tristan Thompson still seeks his payday or his plan for 2015-16 – here is the pertinent quote from’s transcription of Love’s guest spot:

“I feel great. I actually spent three weeks in Park City, Utah at the Olympic training facility there, rehabbed my shoulder, got in great shape. I’m probably a month, month and a half away from returning. I don’t want to set an immediate timeline, but I feel really good.”


No. 3: Seventies’ Celtics squeezed in acclaim — With Jo Jo White finally entering the Naismith Hall of Fame Friday, with Tom Heinsohn getting enshrined again (as a coach this time, having already made it as a player) and with Dave Cowens and John Havlicek as their boosters and advocates, the Boston Celtics’ NBA championships of 1974 and 1976 got more than a little attention over the weekend. Some would say it’s overdue, relative to how the Bill Russell, Larry Bird and Big Three title teams are remembered both locally and nationally. That’s the angle Gary Washburn took in his Boston Globe piece, examining how a team possibly could be underrated when it boasted three Hall of Fame players while being coached by a fourth – and managed by a fifth, Red Auerbach:

The Celtics won two titles in three years in the mid-’70s, in the midst of Boston busing desegregation and another failed World Series attempt by the Red Sox.

For some reason, those Celtics title teams don’t receive the attention of their ’60s predecessors or ’80s successors, perhaps because they consisted of a trio of stars surrounded by a changing set of role players. Perhaps because the ’70s Celtics did not dominate as did the teams of the ’60s.

Perhaps immediate success following Bird’s arrival damaged the impact of the Celtics’ title teams of the 1970s.

“The thing that bothers me the most when they forget about those teams, it’s not bragging or anything. They start rating teams, they don’t tip their hat toward us,” Cowens said. “Knowing what we did, any of Bird’s teams, any of the Laker teams, any of the Bulls, if they had play against us [they would have a tough time], because we didn’t have too many chinks in the armor, we weren’t big but we knew how to move people around, we were a pretty smart team. When you only lose 14 games one year [in 1972-73], that was pretty good. I thought we showed the world we were a pretty good team.”

While Havlicek humbly discusses his personal accomplishments, which include being the franchise’s all-time scoring leader without the luxury of a 3-point shot, Cowens stands behind him for support, just like the old days.

“They just don’t talk about Havlicek enough,” Cowens said. “I’m going to tell you, I never played with a guy that was that thorough and that accomplished, that tough-minded. Just look at some of his numbers, it’s amazing.

“They go from Russell and right away go to Bird, they don’t even look at that guy as much as they should. He was the ultimate team guy.”


No. 4: Tellem tells ’em in Detroit — Talking up both civic and basketball impact, Arn Tellem, the Detroit Pistons’ new vice chairman, arrived in town and met with some media. The Detroit Free Press caught up with the former NBA super agent-turned-team executive as he preached both significant Pistons improvement and fan patience:

“I’m coming here to make a difference,” Tellem said of his move from Los Angeles, where he was a star with Wasserman Media Group, a sporting and entertainment marketing outfit. “If it was just limited to basketball, it would not be enough of a motivation to come and do it, but to have an involvement from an ownership level in basketball and the business and the community and see where we can make a difference and contribute to what’s going on here in Detroit and Michigan” is what convinced him.

Tellem, whose hiring by [owner Tom] Gores was announced in June, will be living in a condominium in Birmingham. He expects to acquire an ownership stake in the Pistons later this year, now that Gores has consolidated ownership of the team by recently acquiring his Platinum Equity Group’s 49% share.

“That was part of the plan when I came in,” Tellem said. “My hope is now that by the end of the year, we’re going to hopefully have a piece of the action. Tom’s desire is to have this team long-term for him and his family and to really accomplish a lot here — not only winning basketball games, but to make a difference in the community here.”
Tellem repeated earlier assertions by both him and Gores that the Pistons are committed to the Palace as their home; there’s no plan to join the Red Wings in the arena now being built by the Ilitch family for the hockey team in Midtown.

But that said, Tellem acknowledged that he’s here to explore a wide range of projects and partnerships that could include the Pistons playing some basketball games in Detroit, television contracts and sponsorships, and philanthropic activities in the community.

The Pistons have donated money in recent years to the so-called grand bargain that protected city-owned artworks and eased pension cuts as part of Detroit’s bankruptcy exit, and also helped the city buy public safety vehicles. Along with other one-off projects in the future, Tellem said “we’d like to come up with a couple of signature initiatives in the community that would be led by the Pistons.” He’ll be meeting with government, business and community leaders in the region, starting next month to “get input from the community to guide us” on what to do.

While the Pistons have not made it to the NBA playoffs since 2009, Tellem said ticket sales and sponsorships have been ticking upward the past few years.

“I think we’re going to take a big step up this year and we’re going to improve,” he said, but cautioned that a championship team the caliber of the old Bad Boys may take awhile.

“The NBA, among U.S. pro sports leagues, is the most difficult to suddenly rebuild with free agents and re-do a team,” he said, citing recent struggles of fabled big-market franchises as the New York Knicks and Los Angeles Lakers.

In basketball, he said, “free agency is very limited and most players stay with their team,” due to the way the NBA salary cap works.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Chicago’s Pau Gasol likes what he’s heard from new Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg about a higher-octane offense and put some in his own game, hitting six of his seven 3-pointers en route to 30 points against Poland. … Washington’s Bradley Beal might not have a contract extension done before this season, but that’s not a hand-wringer for Wizards fans. … Of the current NBA players whose fathers competed in the league, which ones’ pops had the most game? … Sixers coach Brett Brown talks Jahlil Okafor and Dario Saric. … One clueless security guard in the offseason isn’t really a problem, but it did make for another amusing Jeremy Lin anecdote. … We’ve suggested this before here at and now’s Kevin Pelton is on board too: Former NBA center Jack Sikma maybe oughta be among the game’s luminaries honored in Springfield, Mass. …

Morning Shootaround Sept. 12

VIDEO: New Orleans Pelicans point guard Jrue Holiday and his soccer star wife Lauren are a true two-sport super couple


Thompson will be absent from LeBron’s Miami workouts | Holiday, Pelicans taking cautious approach heading into camp| Stunned Canadians assess damage after upset

No. 1: Thompson will be absent from LeBron’s Miami workouts — Not all of the Cleveland Cavaliers will be taking their talents to South Beach for pre-training camp workouts organized by LeBron James. Restricted free agent power forward Tristan Thompson will not be attending the festivities, not without his future with the team solidified with a new contract. Chris Haynes of the Northeast Ohio Media Group has more:

With the 24-year-old in the midst of a lengthy contract stalemate with the club, he has elected not to appear.

The first day of the camp [was Friday].

James summoned his teammates to join him in South Florida to get a head start on the upcoming season. It will be a year in which the team is a betting favorite to win the NBA Finals.

NEOMG is told that Kyrie Irving, Kevin Love, Anderson Varejao, J.R. Smith, Iman Shumpert, Joe Harris, Mo Williams, James Jones, Richard Jefferson and Sasha Kaun are expected to be on the scene in Miami.

Irving, Love and Varejao will be limited as they recover from injuries that required surgery. Timofey Mozgov’s absence is due to being on the mend from a knee scope over the summer.

*** (more…)

Canada blows chance at Olympic berth

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Canadian Men’s National Team had won its previous seven games by an average of 26.3 points and by no less than 17. Statistically, it had been the best team at the FIBA Americas tournament by a wide margin.

But with an Olympic bid on the line in the semifinals on Friday, Canada blew it.

Thanks to a last-second foul call on a rebound, Venezuela came back from a seven-point deficit with 3:00 to go to upend Canada 79-78 and earn its first trip to the Olympics since 1992. Aaron Doornekamp committed the foul (which was reviewed to see if it occurred before the buzzer) and Gregory Vargas hit the first of two free throws with three tenths of a second left to put Venezuela up one. He missed the second on purpose and Canada had no chance to get a final shot off.


After a couple of big buckets from the Magic’s Andrew Nicholson and a jumper from the Celtics’ Kelly Olynyk, Canada led 75-68 with three minutes to go. But Venezuela guard Heissler Guillent hit two huge 3-pointers to make it a one-point game. Then Olynyk lost the ball at midcourt and fouled Guillent when trying to recover it.

After Guillent’s two free throws put Venezuela up one, Nicholson hit one of two to tie the game. Venezuela then isolated Guillent on Cory Joseph. He missed the three, but Venezuela got a second chance to win the game with the Doornekamp foul on the rebound.

Olynyk led all scorers with 34 points on 11-for-13 shooting, adding 13 rebounds. Brady Heslip (10 points) was the only other Canadian in double figures. Andrew Wiggins scored nine points on 4-for-11 shooting, while Anthony Bennett went scoreless in 16 minutes. Olynyk and Wiggins combined for 10 turnovers.

Venezuela was playing without Greivis Vasquez and had no NBA players on its roster. Canada had nine.

The Toronto Star‘s Doug Smith was in Mexico City

Forget for a minute the call that put Gregory Vargas on the line with three-tenths of a second left, because it was an uncharacteristic performance from Canada all night that has derailed their Olympic dreams for now.

There were 17 turnovers, many ghastly and unforced; there were a dozen loose balls that weren’t corralled, there were missed rebounds and a general malaise that was in stark contrast to the way Canada had played each night for more than a week.

Nerves? Perhaps.

“It seemed like we were a little bit unsure,” said Triano. “I think this is a great experience for our young kids, Kelly (Olynyk, masterful with 34 points) is one of our most veteran guys, he’s been here before . . . a lot of these other guys have not been in this climate.”

In the second semifinal, Argentina beat host Mexico to earn its fourth straight trip to the Olympics. Mexico led by five at the half, but the game was tied with less than six minutes to go in the fourth quarter when a 6-0 Argentina run gave them a lead they wouldn’t give up.

Luis Scola (18 points and 10 rebounds) and Andres Nocioni (10 and 13) both had double-doubles for Argentina as Manu Ginobili watched courtside. The Bucks’ Jorge Gutierrez had 17 points and four steals for Mexico, but fouled out with more than three minutes to go. After averaging 19 points through Mexico’s first eight games, Gustavo Ayon (eight points) had a quiet night, even though, like both Scola and Nocioni, he played all 40 minutes.

Canada and Mexico will have another chance to qualify for the Olympics in one of next year’s Olympic qualifying tournaments, but will most likely have to go through tougher competition out of Europe.


Canada plays for Olympic berth Friday

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — Friday a big day for Canada basketball.

Canada has produced two of the last three No. 1 picks in the Draft, as well as more than a dozen other NBA players, most under the age of 25. And now it can take a big step on the international stage.

The FIBA Americas semifinals take place in Mexico City on Friday, with two Olympic berths on the line. Saturday’s final is kind of an afterthought, because the Americas gets two bids to Rio, in addition to the two it’s already been awarded.


In the first game on Friday, Canada will play Venezuela for the fifth spot in next year’s field. Canada lost its first game in Mexico to Argentina, but has won the last seven by an average of 26 points (and by no less than 17). Statistically, coach Jay Triano‘s team has been, by far, the best team in the tournament.


Andrew Wiggins has led the way with 15.5 points per game. Wiggins, Nik Stauskas and Brady Heslip have combined to shoot 53-for-108 (49.1 percent) from 3-point range. Cory Joseph has run the show and Anthony Bennett has looked like a guy who might be able to contribute to the Wolves this season.

But it would all be for naught if the Canadians don’t beat Venezuela. The Venezuelans are without Greivis Vasquez, but have been the best defensive team in the tournament thus far.

Canada last played in the Olympics in 2000. It’s only Olympic medal (silver) came in 1936. With all its young talent, it could join the likes of France, Serbia and Spain as contenders for the No. 2 basketball country in the world behind the United States in the coming years. And Friday’s game against Venezuela would be a critical step in the process.

The second semifinal is a rematch Wednesday’s pool-play finale, in which Mexico used a huge fourth quarter to force another meeting for the Americas’ other Olympic berth. Argentina had been playing for the No. 1 seed and a matchup with Venezuela in the semis, but couldn’t hold onto what was a 13-point lead at the end of the third quarter.

Mexico is led by Gustavo Ayon, who has averaged 19.1 points and 11.6 boards. Luis Scola (22.4 ppg) and Andres Nocioni (17.0 ppg) have combined to average almost 40 points for Argentina.

The losers of Friday’s games will play for third place on Saturday, and will still have an opportunity to qualify for the Olympics. They’ll receive bids to next year’s qualifying tournaments, which will produce the final three bids to Rio.


Mitchell to serve as Wolves’ interim coach as Saunders battles cancer

VIDEO: Sam Mitchell talked about the Timberwolves’ prospects for the 2015-16 season during Summer League

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Sam Mitchell will serve as the Minnesota Timberwolves interim coach to start the 2015-16 season as Flip Saunders focuses on his battle with cancer.

The news was first reported by Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports on Thursday afternoon.

The Timberwolves held a Friday morning press conference to make a major announcement, where Mitchell was introduced as the interim coach.

Saunders has been undergoing chemotherapy after being diagnosed earlier this summer with what is considered to be a treatable form of Hodgkins Lymphoma. Mitchell earned NBA Coach of the Year honors in 2007 with the Toronto Raptors and coached the Raptors.

Morning Shootaround — Sept. 6

VIDEO: Day 1 Wrap: EuroBasket 2015


Colangelo looks ahead to 2016 | Nowitzki, Schröder lead German win on Day One of EuroBasket 2015 | Bonner looking beyond basketball | Philippines still working to add Clarkson

No. 1: Colangelo looks ahead to 2016 The 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro are about a year away, but USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo understands that it’s never too early to look ahead. Speaking with the Boston Globe‘s Gary Washburn, Colangelo looked forward to some of the USA’s most likely competition for a gold medal in Rio…

“Well, first of all, there’s a wave — just like the NBA — there’s a continual wave of new young players. Generally speaking, that’s true internationally also,” Team USA chairman Jerry Colangelo said. “I think without question, you’d have to say Spain, if they get their players to perform and are healthy, despite the fact they are aging, they’re very formidable.

“Serbia is considered a very strong international team coming into this Olympic year. I think France is another team, age aside, there’s a lot of talent, and a big sleeper in the whole mix is Canada. Canada has some extraordinary, very good, fine young players and they’re going to be heard from. If it’s not ’16, it will be ’20.”

The Serbian team is led by Timberwolves forward Nemanja Bjelica and Fenerbahce Ulker’s Bojan Bogdanovic. Depending on the status of Spurs guard Tony Parker for next year’s Games, France could be the stiffest competition with Nicolas Batum, Evan Fournier, Rudy Gobert, and Joffrey Lauvergne.

Team Canada is loaded with young prospects such as Andrew Wiggins, Tristan Thompson, Nik Stauskas, Andrew Nicholson, and Cory Joseph. The Canadians are currently vying to qualify for their first Olympic Games since 2000.

“If you’ve competed your whole life, you certainly understand that the wins yesterday are yesterday’s news,” Colangelo said. “All that matters is now. That’s a driver for all of us who are involved in USA Basketball. The culture that we’ve tried to build is very unique. We’re all very proud to represent our country.”

Colangelo, 75, has been the GM and owner of the Phoenix Suns, owner of the Arizona Diamondbacks, and was critical in bringing the Winnipeg Jets to Phoenix in the 1990s.

“As Americans we’re taking a lot of heat around the world and when you have a chance to represent your country on the international stage we take that very seriously,” he said. “I’ve been blessed with a long career in sports and a lot of success, but at this stage of my life, to be able to lead an organization that is doing all of what I just said, makes it special for me.

“Back in ’04 as I watched where we were, USA Basketball, some of the other countries really had togetherness, like Argentina, like Spain. That was something I thought we needed to develop. So developing a national team concept, stating that we had to change our culture and to see where we are, it makes you feel very good. There was a plan. Right now we’re on a roll.”


No. 2: Nowitzki, Schröder lead German win on Day One of EuroBasket 2015 EuroBasket 2015 tipped off yesterday in several cities across Europe, and in early action Germany froze Iceland behind 15-point games from both Dallas Mavericks’ forward Dirk Nowitzki and Atlanta Hawks guard Dennis Schröder. The Netherlands also made headlines as they knocked off Georgia on day one

Iceland outscored Germany 22-12 in the final quarter as Jon Steffansson topped all scorers with 23 points for the team considered an outsider in the tough Group B.

Nowitzki needed time to get into the game but also contributed seven rebounds. Schroder had six rebounds and four assists.

The group stage of the tournament is being played in four cities across the continent.

Poland beat Bosnia-Herzegovina 68-64 in Group A in Montpellier, France, the Netherlands stunned Georgia 73-72 in Group C in Zagreb, Croatia, and the Czech Republic routed Estonia 80-57 in Group D in Riga, Latvia.

Robin Smeulders sank a jumper with 18 seconds remaining to lift the Dutch to victory as they returned to the competition for the first time since 1989. Charlon Kloof led all scorers with 22 points. Georgia got 16 points from the Dallas Mavericks center Zaza Pachulia and Tomike Shengelia also added 16.

Jan Vesely led the Czech Republic with 16 points and eight rebounds.

Marcin Gortat, the Washington Wizards center, had 10 points and seven rebounds for Poland, while Adam Waczinski had 15 points. Andrija Stepanovic led Bosnia with 20.


No. 3: Bonner looking beyond basketball Matt Bonner may not rate extensive playing time with the San Antonio Spurs, but the role player understands his job and has won a couple of rings during his tenure in Texas. Now, as he enters his twelfth season, the always-interesting Bonner is showing he understands what’s required to continue a career in basketball beyond just playing the game, as our own Ian Thomsen writes

“I don’t have a set number of years that I’m going to play,” said Bonner, looking ahead to his upcoming 10th season with the Spurs — which will be his 12th in the NBA overall. “I’m going to play as long as I can play. With my skill set, as long as I’m healthy, I think I can keep playing. And I’m fortunate to play for an organization that values recovery and keeping guys healthy and extending careers.”

Bonner is 6-foot-10 and 235 pounds with three-point range (41.4 percent for his career, which ranks No. 15 in the NBA all-time), enabling him to stand up to big men defensively and create mismatches at the other end of the floor — the same formula that has enabled Robert Horry and others like him to play into their late-30s. But Bonner also has recognized that long-term plans evolve quickly, and that the future arrives with the furious speed of these young players who were stampeding back and forth across the Summer League court in July.

When the Spurs’ season ended with a loss to the Clippers in the opening round — the first time in four years that San Antonio hadn’t played into June — Bonner tried to take advantage of the silver lining. At age 35, he signed on for two of the several hands-on courses in the NBPA’s career development program.

Bonner was in Las Vegas to investigate a potential career in an NBA front office. Even as he studied these young players who were dreaming of the same kind of playing career that he had made for himself, Bonner found himself looking beyond. He wasn’t going to be able to play basketball for another 30 years, and at the same time he was too young to retire.


No. 4: Philippines still working to add Clarkson There are just a few weeks before FIBA Asia tips off, meaning time is running short for the Philippines to add Lakers guard Jordan Clarkson to their official roster, which would also require Clarkson missing some of Lakers training camp. But after meeting yesterday with Lakers execs Jeannie Buss and Mitch Kupchak, the Philippines officials feel like they have a better grasp on what’s needed to make it happen, writes Nelson Beltran in the Philippine Star

“It’s still a work in progress but with better clarity,” said SBP vice chairman Ricky Vargas after a meeting with Los Angeles Lakers team president Jeanie Buss and general manager Mitch Kupchak in LA.

Vargas said the Lakers officials have no objection for Clarkson to play for the national team on a long-term program.

But a stint by Clarkson in the forthcoming Asian meet is subject to the approval of “the Lakers coaches” since it will run in conflict with the Lakers’ media day on Sept. 28 and the Lakers’ training camp in Hawaii on Sept. 29-Oct. 7.

In the Asian meet, Oct. 1-3 is set for the quarterfinals, semifinals and final.

“They requested some time to talk to the Lakers coaches,” said Vargas.

Accompanied by PBA board member Patrick Gregorio in a six-day whirlwind trip to Taipei, Hong Kong and the US, Vargas also announced a positive dinner meeting with the father of Jordan.

“(He’s) appreciative of reception his son received from the Filipino basketball fans and from Gilas Pilipinas team,” said Vargas of his talk with Mike Clarkson.

“They asked to review the arrangement and wanted assurance that we secure Lakers permission to allow him to skip three days of training camp,” Vargas also said.

“We go home tomorrow bringing with us a more positive feeling and a commitment from the Lakers and parents that Jordan will be part of Gilas program for the long term,” Vargas added.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Josh Powell is leaving his gig as an assistant with the Rockets to try and play for the Bucks next season … Nate Robinson is reportedly considering an offer from a team in ChinaSteph Curry says Riley Curry taught him how to dance

Blogtable: Can any team challenge the USA in Rio in 2016?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


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>Qualifying for the Rio Summer Olympics continues this month with FIBA Americas and EuroBasket. Is there anybody out there who can truly challenge the USA in 2016?”

Steve Aschburner, “Truly” challenge, as in stand toe-to-toe and slug it out with Team USA? No, I don’t think so. But as a squad capable of pulling off an upset, I wouldn’t want to sleep on Canada. The group of north-of-the-border NBA players is young – Andrew Wiggins, Tristan Thompson, Anthony Bennett, Cory Joseph, Andrew Nicholson – so 2020 might be a year in which Canada makes real Olympic noise, but even one year out is going to make a difference for a tight and budding squad.

Fran Blinebury,  With a full complement of elite players the United States is easily the class of the field. But a key to the success that Jerry Colangelo and Mike Krzyzewski have brought back to the USA Basketball is having respect for the field. You wouldn’t want to sleep on a Spanish team with Pau and Marc Gasol and Rudy Fernandez or France with Tony Parker, Boris Diaw, Nicolas Batum and Rudy Gobert.

Scott Howard-Cooper,  Sure the U.S. can be challenged. The Olympics become a single-elimination tournament at some point, so anything is possible. And the rosters that have been together for years and play team ball are still dangerous. Spain is at the top of that list, while also noting that I like France’s possibilities as well. But it’s still Team USA’s gold to lose. The favorites before will be the favorites again.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThe short answer is no. Under Jerry Colangelo and Coach K, the USA has shaped up and restored order in the basketball world. That said, in the future I’d keep a watch out on Canada and Australia.The Canadians under Steve Nash and with Andrew Wiggins and Co. are building something special. And Down Under, gaining steam is a growing generation of teens who are the children of American professional players.

John Schuhmann, In no particular order, the next three best teams are France, Serbia and Spain. The U.S. has a huge advantage in regard to talent and depth, and they put Serbia away early in the gold medal game of last year’s World Cup. But both France and Spain – with more size, experience and athleticism – are better equipped to knock them off should they cross paths. The U.S. will be the heavy favorite in Rio next year, but a gold medal is never a given when it’s a single-elimination format with 40-minute games.

Sekou Smith,  With all due respect to the competition, they all know they are going to Rio to fight for second place. That’s not American arrogance on display, it’s just reality. Even if there is a team capable of challenging the U.S. for a quarter or two, the group Jerry Colangelo and Coach K have assembled (whatever the 12-man roster) should prove too strong and too deep for Spain, France, Canada or any other crew eager to play hero. A true challenger is not on the radar right now and perhaps not anytime soon, provided the USA Basketball machine remains dialed in and well stocked.

Ian Thomsen, The old contenders – Spain, France and Argentina – could still be hanging on, but the team to watch (pending its qualification for Rio) is going to be Canada. By 2020 the Canadians will be the main challengers to the US – and they may emerge as early as next summer.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: At the risk of sounding overconfident, when Team USA is at their full-strength, I don’t think anyone can challenge them. A lineup of Steph Curry, James Harden, LeBron James, Anthony Davis and Kevin Durant would be dynamic and destructive, and that doesn’t even factor in a bench (Westbrook! CP3! Blake!) that could provide Coach K all sorts of mix and match options. Oh, and sure, Kobe we could use you, too. I assume the USA will meet stiff opposition along the way, perhaps from teams such as France or Spain or a younger team like Canada. But if Team USA is playing at their full potential, I think it will be a dream in Rio.