Posts Tagged ‘Amare Stoudemire’

Nash’s greatness found in the numbers


VIDEO: Steve Nash Will Miss The 2014-15 NBA Season

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – Mike D’Antoni, Steve Nash and the Phoenix Suns changed NBA offense forever. They showed us what can be accomplished with a simple pick-and-roll, floor spacing and a willingness to share the ball.

Elements of D’Antoni’s “Seven seconds or less” offense are seen throughout the league today. But Nash was running the NBA’s best offense long before D’Antoni was. In his last three years as the starting point guard in Dallas, the Mavericks ranked No. 1 in offensive efficiency.

Nash took that streak to Phoenix and continued it for another six years. He ran the No. 1 offense with Dirk Nowitzki and Michael Finley, even with Antoine Walker shooting 82-for-305 (27 percent) from 3-point range in 2003-04. In fact, when you compare teams’ offensive efficiency with the league average, that Mavs team had the No. 1 offense of the last 37 years (since the league started counting turnovers in 1977).

In Phoenix, Nash ran the No 1. offense with Amar’e Stoudemire and Joe Johnson, and kept it at No. 1 when Johnson left for Atlanta and Stoudemire missed all but three games in 2005-06. Even when Shaquille O’Neal arrived and supposedly bogged down the Suns’ attack, they had the most efficient offense in the league.

The Suns played at a fast pace, but we’re not looking at points per game, here. We’re looking at points per possession. And not only did Nash run the No. 1 offense of the last 37 years, he’s run each of the top five offenses of the last 37 years.

20141024_nash

Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlain each led the league in scoring for seven straight seasons. Steve Nash ran the league’s best offense for nine straight, a run that started when Shaq and Kobe Bryant were at their best and ended when LeBron James was winning multiple MVPs.

Nash hasn’t said whether his career is over now that he’s been ruled out for the entire 2014-15 season, but it’s reasonable to guess that it is. It’s also reasonable to believe that we’ll never see another streak like the one he had between 2001 and 2010.

You can debate the merit Nash’s MVP awards or his place in the NBA’s all-time point guard rankings. But there’s no debating that he was one of the best offensive players of his generation. The numbers speak for themselves.

Kerr finally gets his chance with Curry


VIDEO: The NBA TV crew analyzes the transition of Steve Kerr

OAKLAND – They have joked about it for months now, Steve Kerr and Bob Myers, Kerr and Larry Riley, and Kerr and Stephen Curry, over the phone and in person, through the years and over international borders in an outcome so strange it comes with a laugh track.

A little more than five years later, everyone has unexpectedly met here, Kerr as the new Warriors coach, Myers as the general manager and primary recipient of what didn’t happen, Curry as the All-Star point guard, and with Riley still part of the organization as director of scouting. Roles have changed. Lives have changed.

One thing has remained true, though: Kerr has never been so happy to lose.

He was the Suns general manager in June 2009 and wanted Curry in the draft. Badly. There was phone call after phone call between Kerr and Riley, his Warriors counterpart. There were internal conversations among Phoenix management about the risk of trading 26-year-old Amar’e Stoudemire coming off three consecutive seasons of at least 20 points and eight rebounds — and the risk of keeping Stoudemire with free agency a year away and growing health concerns.

The Warriors were very interested, intrigued by the chance to get the known of a proven power forward over the uncertainty of a scoring point guard from mid-major Davidson. They also really liked Curry and, in fact, doubted he would be on the board when Riley picked seventh. Arizona’s Jordan Hill was the fallback, probably for both sides, for the Suns if a deal had been arranged and for Golden State to keep if no deal was in place.

It got close, but never imminent. The Warriors were not going to trade for Stoudemire unless he at least showed strong likelihood of re-signing as a free agent the next summer, and Riley had yet to so much as ask the Suns for permission to have the conversation. And if Golden State and Stoudemire did talk, the result would have been the same. He was not going to commit to anything at that point other than showing up, playing hard and keeping an open mind about the future, an understandable stance that almost certainly would have ended the talks bouncing between Phoenix and Oakland.

Plus, once Blake Griffin (Clippers), Hasheem Thabeet (Grizzlies), James Harden (Thunder) and Tyreke Evans (Kings) were picked and the Timberwolves followed with the infamous Ricky Rubio-Jonny Flynn double dip of points guards at five and six, Curry was still available at seven. Riley’s stance hardened. No longer was it just weighing acquiring Stoudemire as a possible one-season rental while also sending out Andris Biedrins and big salaries as cap balast, it was believing Curry would be special. Riley would be demoted to director of scouting and replaced by Myers in 2012, but also secure a positive place in Golden State history by not biting on the tantalizing lure of an athletic power forward that put up numbers.

The Warriors took Curry seventh and he turned into a star. The Suns kept Stoudemire one more season and 23.1 points and 8.9 rebounds and played it right to not get into a bidding war with the Knicks in 2010 free agency.

And….

The Warriors ended up hiring Kerr to coach. To coach the entire roster, obviously, but with Curry as the best player and one of the main attractions of choosing Golden State over the option of working for long-time friend and coaching mentor Phil Jackson with the Knicks.

How life could be different if Kerr got his wish in 2009.

“I may not be here,” he said.

It was one of the first things they talked about after Kerr was hired in May, when he was home near San Diego and called Curry on a postseason golf outing in Mexico. Kerr couldn’t bring him to Phoenix, the new coach told his point guard, so Kerr would come to Curry.

“He’s said a couple times, ‘You know, I really wanted him,’ ” said Myers, an agent in 2009. “Obviously any coach that has the opportunity to coach this team, that’s one of the first things mentioned, if not the first, which is, ‘I get an opportunity to coach that guy.’ And not just his talent on the floor, but who he is as a person. It makes perfect sense to me. I’d want to coach him too if I was a coach. We’ve joked around about that.”

Because they can now. Now that Kerr finally has Curry on his side.

Blogtable: NY’s plans with ‘Melo, without

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Idle summertime chatter | LeBron + Cavs = ??? | The Good & Bad of ‘Melo in NY



VIDEO: Howard Beck breaks down the news around the Knicks and free agent Carmelo Anthony

> You’re Phil Jackson. What do you do with the Knicks if Carmelo Anthony leaves? What if he stays?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I refuse to answer the first question because it ain’t happening – Melo’s going nowhere. The money, the attention and now the capability to claim he’s staying for Phil Jackson‘s “vision” (when it’s really the money and the attention) keep him right where he is. So with Anthony on board, Jackson will have to cue up some of the share-the-ball-you’ll-get-it-back teachings to Michael Jordan from back in the day. And he’ll need to lure Kevin Durant, LeBron James and/or Kevin Love to Manhattan because Jackson has limited experience with a roster that doesn’t boast one or two of the league’s top half dozen guys.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: If Anthony leaves, you pat James Dolan and the Knicks franchise on the head and make a beeline back to Playa del Rey and Jeannie Buss.  If he stays, well, you might want to do that anyway.  New York is not a market that has the patience or the long-range vision to do what’s necessary, which is why with the exception of a couple blips on the radar screen the Knicks have spent the past 40 years peddling the false notion that they’re contenders.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.comIf Anthony leaves, you celebrate? Really, it wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world. A max contract is a cap-stuffer particularly as Melo plays into his mid-30s. Him leaving would totally free up Phil Jackson to remake the roster in 2015 when potential free agents include Kevin Love, LaMarcus Aldridge, Marc Gasol and Goran Dragic. If Anthony stays, Jackson is already on the right track by trying to unload Amar’e Stoudemire‘s $23.4 million contract without taking much back. If Anthony returns, he knows 2014-15 is only a bridge to next summer when the Knicks, even with Melo’s max deal, will be flush with cap space to go nuts.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Nothing much I can do if he leaves. Square 1 is Square 1. Maybe try to extract a couple picks/player(s) if it’s a sign-and-trade, but draft choices wouldn’t be paid out for at least another season and maybe, if it’s the Lakers, several. I might like the appeal of something close to a blank slate lineup wise while still having salaries to untangle, but I would also realize that’s the positive spin on “Ummmm … errrrr … let’s see here….” If Carmelo stays, I know there’s a better chance to land free agents in future summers and a quicker path to wins. Anthony plus Jose Calderon’s shooting plus Tim Hardaway Jr. coming off an encouraging rookie season is a decent start on the re-build.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Listen, as much as I’d love to be rich, famous and have more rings than your neighborhood jeweler, I wouldn’t want to be Phil Jackson in New York if and/or when Carmelo Anthony spurns the Knicks for either Chicago, Los Angeles or that dreaded outfit in Miami. The haters will be merciless if ‘Melo bolts after receiving a max offer to stick around. If ‘Melo stays, Phil has to include his max-earning superstar on his rebuilding plan, which has to include making a monster splash in free agency in 2015 (Melo and Kevin Love is a great place to start with the East Coast Triangle). ‘Melo doesn’t get to choose his new teammates, but he at least needs to be consulted in some form or fashion, because he’s going to be right up there with Phil and James Dolan on the fall guy list if this experiment doesn’t work out.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogCarmelo, you’re not leaving $30 plus mil on the table. We need you. But not for this season — the Knicks this season aren’t going to be much better than they were a season ago. Then again, they can’t be much worse. But after this season, Stoudemire and Bargnani come off the books and clear up about $35 million in cap space, and suddenly we can be players in free agency. The triangle offense starts to take hold, and now we’re in the mix, particularly in the weak Eastern Conference. By the way, Cleanthony Early is going to be a steal, and our system will make contributors out of guys who had been overlooked in the past. So it’s going to take some time, but be patient. What, ‘Melo, you thought the Lakers would contend right away?

Karan Madhok, NBA India: If Anthony leaves, I’ll be hoping that the always-expectant Knicks fans stay patient for one more year of awful basketball. By this time next year, the Knicks will have a ton of cap space and some interesting free agents (Kevin Love, Rajon Rondo, LaMarcus Aldridge, and, if he signs just a one year extension, maybe even LeBron James) available on the market to recruit to New York. If Anthony stays, I’ll be hoping to convince another contributor (like Pau Gasol, who has experience with Jackson) to sign for cheap, but still sell the team the idea of thinking the future before the present, and the idea of a big offseason in 2015 if they can suffer through a quiet one this year.

Marcelo Nogueira, NBA Argentina: I would start a new age where “the team” would be more important than a star player. If Carmelo stays, it won’t be good for the Knicks. If he leaves, the Knicks have a better opportunity to rebuild, Jackson style.

Guillermo Garcia, NBA Mexico: If Anthony’s still on the team, I’ll try to reinforce the club with another big player … maybe one with the name Gasol?

Three reasons ‘Melo should pick …


VIDEO: Where will Carmelo end up? What factors will he weigh? GameTime has the lowdown …

NBA.com staff

Free-agent forward Carmelo Anthony embarked on a coast-to-coast ‘Melo Across America tour this week, stopping in four different cities to be courted by five different teams. Now, he’s expected to lay low for a day or so — maybe more — as he decides whether to sign a lucrative contract with the New York Knicks, his team for the past three and a half years, or take his talents … elsewhere.

We asked five NBA.com writers across the nation to boil it down for Carmelo. So here are three reasons that Anthony should pick …

CHICAGO

1. The Bulls offer the best fit for his game. He’d be the cymbalist to their John Phillip Sousa, the finisher their ball-sharing offense needs. Only Michael Jordan and Al Capone, in Chicago history, have had greener lights to shoot. And coach Tom Thibodeau‘s team concepts would put lipstick on his defense.

2. Ring, or at least reputation: If he truly wants a championship, Chicago’s supporting cast offers the best shot, with Derrick Rose as a dynamic sidekick, Joakim Noah‘s Defensive Player of the Year fire and Taj Gibson grinding. Just to be known for trying to win, rather than maxing out money … this is his move.

3. New York is full of celebrities. Chicago would be his. This city is aching for star power beyond linebackers and anchormen, and it doesn’t overdo off-court scrutiny or paparazzi. His wife La La Vasquez could be Queen of the Windy City now that Oprah‘s gone.
Steve Aschburner

HOUSTON

1. He would be sliding into a lineup that already includes an All-NBA first team guard in James Harden and All-NBA second team center in Dwight Howard.  Never mind quibbling over last shots.  There wouldn’t be a better collection of three young talents all in their prime.

2. No state income tax makes up for a large portion of that $34 million he’d be leaving on the table in New York. And money, like everything else, just spends bigger in Texas.

3. If prematurely giving him Jeremy Lin’s jersey — with Lin’s warm corpse still in it — wasn’t enough of a “we’ll-do-anything” mentality, Carmelo could probably just ask and the Rockets would chisel his name right over Hakeem Olajuwon’s on that statue in front of the Toyota Center.
Fran Blinebury

DALLAS

1. The Mavs won 49 games in a tough Western Conference with one of the most efficient offenses in the league. Add Melo to Dirk Nowitzki and Monta Ellis, plus newly reacquired Tyson Chandler to bolster the defense and Dallas could be cooking.

2. Coach Rick Carlisle continues to prove he is among the elite tacticians in the game. He’s made the most of nearly fully flipped rosters over the last few seasons. He could be scary good with additional star power and continuity.

3. As controversial as Mark Cuban‘s decision was not to bring back the 2011 title team and plot instead to create cap space under this CBA, Dallas is positioned to add another big-salary free agent in 2015.
Jeff Caplan

LAKERS

1. The Lakers have proven they can not only build a championship roster, but win a title and then rebuild. Anthony is 30. If he’s looking at a four- or five-year contract, depending where he signs and whether it is a sign-and-trade, he needs to know the organization will be able to get somewhere pretty fast. L.A. is farther down the standings than any of the other West options listed and in a better place today than only the Knicks, but the Lakers know how to get back, and fast.

2. “Who else would you like on the team? We’ll still have spending power in the future. A big free-agent hit this summer — you — plus a big free-agent hit next summer. Oh, and any thoughts on the coach?”

3. It’s L.A. If Melo is leaving New York, no other place gives him a better platform for marketing opportunities or entertainment connections for his wife. The butler won’t have to shovel snow in the winter, unless it’s at the weekend-getaway mountain retreat. And don’t worry about the traffic. Get a place near Kobe in Orange County and share the chopper ride to downtown.
Scott Howard-Cooper

NEW YORK

1. If we could have soundtracks for blog posts, you’d hear the bass line from the O’Jays’ “For the Love of Money” playing right now. The Knicks can give Melo more than $129 million over five years. The most any other team can give him is about $96 million over four. And since he’ll be 34 years old when that fifth year comes around, having $29 million more guaranteed would be a nice thing. Little Kiyan needs a new pair of shoes.

2. The 2014-15 season could be a little rough, but the Knicks can bring in another good player or two next summer, when both Amar’e Stoudemire and Andrea Bargnani come off the books. Of course, if they sign Melo for the max now, the Knicks might not have enough cap space to sign a Kevin Love or a LaMarcus Aldridge to their own max deal next year (with Anthony, Jose Calderon and J.R. Smith taking up about 60 percent of the cap). But hey, read No. 1 again.

3. A happy wife is a happy life. Also, New York has the best pizza, bagels and Chinese food. Also, see No. 1.
John Schuhmann

Morning Shootaround: June 15


VIDEO: GameTime: Media Day Recap

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Anthony leaning toward leaving? | Monroe hoping for options | LeBron wants to make history | Spurs not looking to walk away

No. 1: Anthony leaning toward leaving? — The Carmelo Anthony winds will probably blow in a few different directions over the next few weeks. Right now, they’re blowing toward Chicago and Houston, according to Yahoo! Sports Adrian Wojnarowski:

New York Knicks star Carmelo Anthony is leaning toward leaving in pursuit of immediate championship contention, and awaits the Chicago Bulls and Houston Rockets to clear the necessary salary-cap space to sign him in free agency, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

As re-signing with the Knicks continues to fade as his priority, Chicago and Houston have emerged as the clear frontrunners to acquire Anthony, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Anthony’s meeting with Knicks officials on Friday night had little impact on his state of mind, league sources said, because there remain too many uncertainties about how quickly president Phil Jackson can reshape the team into a championship contender.

Chicago and Houston front-office executives are working diligently on contingencies to clear the space to sign Anthony outright – or engage sign-and-trade scenarios with New York, sources said.

(more…)

Next few steps critical for Grizzlies

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: The Grizzlies fell in Game 7 to the Oklahoma City Thunder in the first round of the playoffs

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The picture of instability.

The living and breathing definition of disarray.

That’s what that smoke cloud in Memphis looks like from afar.

The Grizzlies, a year removed from a trip to the 2013 Western Conference finals and weeks after a first round exit from the 2014 playoffs, dismissed team CEO Jason Levien and assistant general manager Stu Lash on Monday, ensuring a major shake-up would dominate their summer for the second straight year. They parted ways with HT fave and well-respected head coach Lionel Hollins after last season’s trip to the conference finals.

Further complicating matters this time around is the Grizzlies giving Dave Joerger — who succeeded Hollins and led the Grizzlies to a 50-win season — permission to speak with the Minnesota Timberwolves about their coaching vacancy.

On the surface it’s yet another head-scratching decision from a franchise that’s making that a habit:

“The Timberwolves are the only NBA team of the 30 in the league that are in his home state and after having a long and honest conversation with Dave, he felt he owed it to his family, which resides entirely in Minnesota … and we felt we owed it to Dave to at least have a discussion in this regard,” Grizzlies GM Chris Wallace told ESPN 92.9 FM in Memphis.

Asked if that was best for the Grizzlies, Wallace said he didn’t see anything wrong with granting Joerger the chance to talk.

“He’s just been granted permission to talk and will do so soon,” said Wallace, who has assumed interim watch over the basketball operations while [Grizzlies owner Robert] Pera restructures the front office.

All signs point to Pera being the one instigating these changes after a reported clash with his management team, changes that elicited this simple but appropriate response from Grizzlies guard Tony Allen:

All this is yet another disconnect between ownership, management and the coaching staff that leads to dysfunction and entropy. The Grizzlies aren’t true championship contenders. But they’re certainly closer to the Western Conference power elite than they are to the consistent lottery crowd.

Pera has every right to do as he pleases with his franchise. He’s paying a handsome price for that right. But he should be careful. There have been others in his shoes who have chosen to do it their way, a “new” way, despite being advised to hire smart people and then step back and allow them to do their jobs.

The richest or smartest man or woman in the room isn’t always right when it comes to basketball decisions. It makes me think back to the way things unraveled in Phoenix when the Robert Sarver-led group took over a contender and slowly but surely reduced the team to a lottery-dweller that hasn’t made the playoffs since 2010.

(Granted, the 2013-14 Suns won 48 games and became just the second team in the past 40 years to win that many games and miss the postseason.)

In a copycat league in which teams structure their franchises based on the most successful outfits, down to the way the socks are organized in the equipment room, it boggles the mind that anyone would want to retrace the steps the Suns took when they broke from the sturdy leadership of Jerry Colangelo and Bryan Colangelo.

Yes, the Suns survived for a couple of seasons without the Colangelo-Mike D’Antoni power structure in place. But that talented roster they initially had — Steve Nash, Amar’e Stoudemire, Shawn Marion and Joe Johnson —  eroded over the years leaving nothing from the glory days but an aging Nash,who was eventually traded to the Los Angeles Lakers..

The Grizzlies would be wise to tread cautiously as they go down what appears to be a similar path. Wallace has been in the front-office game long enough to know just how hard it is to get back to where the Grizzlies are now if they do dip below the playoff line.

Memphis battled back this year from early stumbles and an injury to Marc Gasol to secure that seventh spot in the Western Conference playoffs. Who knows what would have happened in Game 7 of the opening round against the Thunder if they had been able to play Zach Randolph, who had been suspended for clocking Thunder big man Steven Adams in the jaw in Game 6?

The point being, overreacting after a season like this could be detrimental to the long-term health of what’s been built in Memphis. Randolph, Gasol, Allen, Mike Conley, Mike Miller and the rest of the the Grizzlies are ready to compete for the foreseeable future.

Someone needs to wake up, quickly, to refrain from any more of the foolishness that has marked the Grizzlies’ offseason for a second straight spring.

Morning Shootaround — May 11



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 10

NEWS OF THE MORNING

NBA believes it can oust Shelly Sterling, too  | Cavs close to naming permanent GM | Amar’e endorses Steve Kerr | Warriors don’t expect to land Kerr

No. 1: NBA believes it can oust Shelly Sterling, too — Shelly Sterling, the estranged wife of Donald Sterling, has a 50 percent ownership stake in the Los Angeles Clipper and she wants to keep it, despite the NBA attempting to remove her husband from the position. However, the NBA believes they can also remove Shelly Sterling because she was never approved by the NBA Board of Governors as a controlling owner. Ramona Shelburne of ESPN.com has more on the story:

The NBA believes it has the legal grounds to oust both Shelly Sterling and her husband as owners, despite the fact that commissioner Adam Silver’s punishments were specifically leveled only against Donald, according to sources with knowledge of the league’s legal strategy.

Shelly Sterling, the estranged wife of exiled Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, has made it clear to the NBA that she intends to retain her 50 percent ownership interest in the team.

She has publicly and privately cooperated with the league in its actions to ban her husband for life and move to oust him from ownership. However, the league’s contention will be that Shelly Sterling — while entitled to a 50 percent interest in the franchise — has never been approved by the board of governors as the controlling owner. She and team president Andy Roeser, who went on an indefinite leave of absence this week, were only alternate governors.

In order to become the team’s new controlling owner, Shelly Sterling would have to be approved by the board of governors, which is unlikely given her association with her husband of 58 years.

Former Lakers great Magic Johnson said Friday that none of the current Clippers players would play for Shelly Sterling if she retains her ownership.

“Those guys are not going to play for anybody (named) Sterling,” Johnson told USA TODAY Sports and two other reporters at the Omni Dallas Hotel. “It’s just how it is. It’s hard to separate the two. … It’s going to be hard for them to sell that to the fans and definitely to the players.”

Miami Heat guard James Jones, the current secretary-treasurer of the players association, said Saturday that Shelly Sterling would not be a reasonable replacement for her husband.

“No, that’s not something that’s acceptable to us,” Jones said, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. “That’s our stance, and it hasn’t changed, and it won’t.”

Shelly Sterling’s lawyer, Pierce O’Donnell, told ESPN on Friday that his client was “trying to resolve this” amicably with the NBA, but if that wasn’t possible, “We’re going to be in the courts.”

Her position, at this time, O’Donnell said, was to maintain her 50 percent interest in the team for the rest of her life. However, she does not want to be the team’s controlling owner and would welcome “a new, dynamic management team and investors to come in.”

That leaves open the door for a compromise that could avoid a protracted legal battle, sources said.

“Court cases can be protracted. We saw what [Frank and Jamie] McCourt did with the Dodgers. We don’t want to reprise the McCourt spectacle,” O’Donnell said. “This is a great franchise. Shelly’s been a co-owner in the darkest days. And now, ‘Go Clippers!’ maybe we can bring an NBA championship to this city this year. But if she has to fight, she’ll fight. We respect property rights in America. We have due process. And she will fight to retain her interests.”

Shelly Sterling has publicly distanced herself from her estranged husband -whom she’s been separated from for the last few years — since the scandal broke two weeks ago. “Donald’s on his own,” O’Donnell said. “She’s distanced herself from him, she’s repudiated his racist statements. He has nothing to do with the team anymore, he can’t go to the games. What happens to Donald, happens to Donald. She wants to retain her interests.

“Shelly was found by commissioner Silver to be blameless. This is about Donald. Push Donald out, but don’t throw his innocent wife over the cliff.”

 

***

No. 2: Cavs close to naming permanent GMDavid Griffin has served as the Cleveland Cavaliers interim general manager since February 6, when owner Dan Gilbert fired Chris Grant. It now looks like Griffin will soon be the permanent GM for Cleveland, who hold the ninth slot in the NBA Draft Lottery which will take place Tuesday, May 20. Mary Schmitt Boyer of The Cleveland Plain Dealer with more:

After Griffin took over for Grant, the team responded with a six-game winning streak — its longest since the 2009-10 season — and went 17-16 the rest of the season, remaining in the playoff hunt until the final week of the season.

One of the key factors was that less than two weeks after being named, Griffin acquired Spencer Hawes from Philadelphia at the trading deadline.

Griffin, 44, joined the Cavs as vice president of basketball operations in 2010, after Danny Ferry resigned as general manager and Grant was promoted to that position. Before joining the Cavs, Griffin spent 17 years with the Phoenix Suns, starting as an intern in communications and working his way up to Suns senior vice president of basketball operations. He also was the Suns assistant general manager of player personnel, director of player personnel, assistant director of player personnel, basketball operations assistant and media relations assistant.

In addition, he also served as the tournament director of the Nike Desert Classic and was an assistant coach at Scottsdale Community College.

As a kid growing up in Phoenix, Griffin’s goal was to become general manager of the Suns. Before he even graduated from Arizona State in 1995, he was working for Jerry Colangelo‘s team in a variety of roles that prepared him for the job he is now about to begin.

“You never know what’s in someone’s future when you start off getting your foot in the door and getting your first job,” Colangelo told The Plain Dealer earlier this year. “He was always very diligent, a very hard worker and he just wanted a chance or an opportunity. He was ambitious. He had his sights set on much higher things. I’m not sure he knew at the beginning what that might mean, but he wanted to advance. He wanted to move up the ladder.

“So he paid his dues, he really did, in every sense of the word. Here’s a guy who has been somewhat of a lifer who now has his opportunity, but he’s earned that. It wasn’t gifted to him. It wasn’t handed to him. He paid his dues along the way and did a great job. Now he’s got a chance to pave his own future.”

***

No. 3: Amar’e endorses Steve Kerr — New York Knicks forward Amar’e Stoudemire has experience with Steve Kerr from his time with the Phoenix Suns when Kerr was general manager of the team. Stoudemire “adored” his championship mentality and endorses his bid for coach of the Knicks. Ian Begley of ESPN New York has more:

Steve Kerr hasn’t decided yet whether he’ll become the head coach of the Knicks. But if he ends up in New York, Kerr will have a strong supporter in Amar’e Stoudemire.

“I like Steve Kerr. For one, when he was a GM (in Phoenix, when Stoudemire was with the Suns) he was always preaching about winning and winning a title and that’s something that I adored about him,” Stoudemire said earlier this week on “The Herd with Colin Cowherd” on ESPN Radio. “And then also, secondly, he has a formula to win; he’s been a winner in this league before. He wants to win. And he reminds me of somewhat of a player-coach that knows the game and knows what players go through as far as ups and downs throughout the year and that’s going to help him.”

Kerr, according to an NBA source, is with his family in San Diego contemplating offers to coach the Knicks and the Warriors or remaining with TNT as a broadcaster. The Knicks are believed to be the favorite, thanks to Kerr’s strong ties to Knicks president Phil Jackson. It is unclear if either team has made a formal contract offer.

The Knicks are expected to offer a deal that is close in length to the five-year contract Jackson signed in March. If New York ends up in a bidding war with Golden State over Kerr’s services, it would surprise many around the league if Knicks owner James Dolan loses that fight.

There is one aspect of the Kerr-Golden State dynamic that appears in the Knicks’ favor. There is somewhat of a split in the Warriors organization in its support for Kerr. Two sources told ESPNNewYork.com on Thursday that management prefers Kerr but some players have privately expressed support for another candidate, Stan Van Gundy.

If Kerr ends up in New York, Stoudemire is confident he can thrive under the leadership of Kerr and Jackson. The 11-year veteran pointed out that versatile big men such as Pau Gasol have thrived in Jackson’s triangle offense.

“I think what he looks for in bigs are bigs that have multiple skills,” Stoudemire said. “You better shoot the ball from the outside, put the ball on the floor when need be, make great passes out of double-teams, sort of being a pressure-release guy. Versatile bigs are what I think he looks for and that’s what I am.”

***

No. 4: Warriors don’t expect to land Kerr — More Kerr news. The Golden State Warriors reportedly would love to hire Kerr, as well. Especially since Kerr and Warriors owner Joe Lacob have been family friends for years. But they reportedly don’t expect to land him with Kerr deep in negotiation talks with Phil Jackson and the New York Knicks for their coaching position. Marc Stein of ESPN.com reports:

Sources told ESPN.com that the Warriors fear Kerr is “too deep” in talks with the Knicks and new shot-caller Phil Jackson to convince Kerr to rebuff Jackson now, despite Kerr’s close relationship with Warriors owner Joe Lacob and team president Rick Welts, as well as Golden State’s proximity to Kerr’s offseason home in San Diego.

But sources also stressed that Stan Van Gundy is actually the closest thing to a top target at this early stage of Golden State’s search for a successor to the fired Mark Jackson, based at least in part on the premise that an experienced coach can ensure that the Warriors maintain upward momentum in the ultra-competitive Western Conference.

ESPN.com reported April 29 that the Knicks were pressing to try to get Kerr formally signed as their new coach when the first round of the playoffs ended, partly because they knew other teams would soon pursue the TNT broadcaster. The Knicks, though, were forced to relent on that timetable and continue to negotiate with former New York Jets general manager Mike Tannebaum, who is serving as Kerr’s representative.

The Warriors immediately joined the list of prime suitors for Kerr after firing Mark Jackson on Tuesday. ESPN.com also reported earlier this week that the Utah Jazz hoped to court Kerr for their opening as well.

Kerr has been huddling with family members in advance of his next TV assignment with TNT: Tuesday’s Game 5 of the Oklahoma City/Los Angeles Clippers series. A timetable for striking a deal with the Knicks remains unclear, but nothing has yet managed to threaten New York’s longstanding status as the favorite to land Kerr as its successor to Mike Woodson.

The longer it goes without New York and Kerr closing a deal, according to one source, does give the Warriors a small measure of hope that Kerr would give them renewed consideration. But the consistent word for days in coaching circles holds that Kerr — who, at 48, has never coached at any level — would find it hard to walk away from Jackson at this advanced stage of negotiations because of the pair’s close relationship.

Kerr is that rare individual in the NBA who can claim both Jackson and one of Jackson’s oldest rivals — San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich — as mentors. As such, Kerr is said to be highly optimistic about Jackson’s ability to make a major impact as a rookie executive with the Knicks, which runs counter to the more common skepticism about Jackson’s effectiveness in his new job. Only in New York, furthermore, would Kerr have the chance to be mentored by a championship coach, reminiscent of the way Pat Riley groomed Erik Spoelstra in Miami.

Sources say that the Warriors, meanwhile, are still establishing a list of candidates to consider, with Van Gundy — after successful stints coaching the Miami Heat and Orlando Magic — still at the front of that line.

ESPN.com reported last Sunday that Van Gundy and Kerr were Golden State’s top two choices if Mark Jackson were fired. Van Gundy doesn’t have the close ties with Warriors management that Kerr has, but he does have a decorated resume that undoubtedly intrigues Warriors officials, who are under some pressure to make a splashy hire to replace the ousted Jackson after all the public support he received from Golden State star Stephen Curry and other Warriors players.

In a radio interview Thursday with 740 AM in Orlando, Van Gundy admitted that he’s not sure if he’s ready to return to coaching after spending the past two seasons in broadcasting and focusing on family time.

“Part of me does, and part of me doesn’t,” Van Gundy told the network. “Look, we’re so happy in Central Florida. It would really have to be a great situation for me to get back in. I miss a lot of it. I really do. I miss the competition. I miss the challenge. I miss the camaraderie of it. But I also like the time that I’ve had, so we’ll just have to see what happens. You weigh every situation.

“Names come up on every job, and my name’s been mentioned in a few,” Van Gundy continued. “But I think the Warrior one comes up because I’m from out there. I went to high school in the Bay Area. I grew up out there. I said several times during my coaching career when we would go play out there that it was always important to me playing out there because I grew up [there].”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Lionel Hollins is expected to interview for the Warriors’ coach position this week in Chicago. … John Wall is hampered by a scratched eye he obtained in Game 3, which continues to affect his vision. … Giannis Antetokounmpo stars in a Greek commercial for chocolate milk. … LeBron James is excited to watch quarterback Johnny Manziel play football with the Cleveland Browns.

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY: Celebrate Mother’s Day today by watching newly crowned MVP Kevin Durant discuss the importance of his mom on NBA TV’s Inside Stuff:


VIDEO: Inside Stuff: KD

Phil, Knicks ready for the next chapter

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: Carmelo Anthony’s top 10 plays … are they his last in a Knicks uniform?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Mike Woodson will be fine. The New York Knicks firing him and his entire staff Monday morning wasn’t even about those proud men who tried, in vain, to cajole the Knicks into the playoffs.

It’s about Phil Jackson, Woodson’s boss, for about a month and the man charged with playing the Knicks’ savior. It’s about clearing the way for something new, something bigger and better and more appropriate for a man swimming in championship rings.

It’s about the Knicks’ next chapter.

It’s about Carmelo Anthony and his future.

It’s about Steve Kerr, Kurt Rambis, Derek Fisher or whoever the poor soul is Phil taps to lead this team from the bench going forward. (The man who gets this job is not going to have 11 rings to show off when the haters crank up the rhetoric at the first sign of adversity.)

It’s about the fortification of the franchise for years to come and not just now, when the public appetite for a head roll was at a fever pitch and had to be satisfied.

Jackson had no choice but to part ways with the Woodson and his crew. He can’t change the culture without making significant changes. He cannot put his stamp on things with a coach that was not of his choosing. Jackson could have made this decision at any time since he took over, but he wanted to see if Woodson could guide the Knicks to the playoffs (something that never came to fruition).

Clearly, the Knicks need more than just a new coach. If this wasn’t a playoff team, it’s certainly not a championship-caliber team. And it doesn’t matter who coaches them (sorry Amar’e Stoudemire and owner James Dolan). They need a roster shakeup as well. That is a much tougher task than selecting a new coach, given all of the salary-cap and luxury-tax hurdles the Knicks must overcome.

The supporting cast needs to be upgraded and tweaked to fit the style that Jackson can live with, because wherever the Knicks go in the immediate future, it’s on him. This is, unequivocally, his and only his team. Sure, the coach and biggest star will share some of the spotlight but not necessarily the burden that Phil must.

That’s the beauty and curse of the job he has. If things go well, he can sit back and take credit for the good times. But if things go awry, he’s on the hook now. It’s his coach, his star and, ultimately, his team.

While some folks are clamoring for him to return to the sideline and do the job he’s always done best, I agree with those who know him well. That crowd that insists Jackson will never coach again and that he’s in full Zen/team-builder mode. It’s the wisest approach to this job for a man whose accomplished as much as he has during his Hall of Fame career.

Jackson needs a coach he can mold and mentor, someone who shares his philosophies about the game and isn’t afraid to have the game’s all-time greatest coach hovering over the entire operation. He’s already made it clear that he won’t be catering to his stars and their wishes (‘Melo voiced public support for Woodson, leaving the needed wiggle room to flip or flop if necessary).

And Woodson doesn’t need anyone’s pity. He knows the game. He knew what was coming the moment Phil took over. He’s a good coach. He’s shown as much everywhere he’s been and he’ll be gainfully employed again, soon. But as mentioned before, this is not about him. This is about Phil and the decisions that come after his clipping of Woodson.

Whatever moves are made, Knicks fans should feel good about the fact that Phil knows exactly what needs to be done, how it gets done. The only lingering question is how long it takes for him to author this next chapter … because the one thing Phil doesn’t have is time.

Jump ball!!!: the Phil Jackson debate

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: What does it take to make the transition from great coach to great GM and does Phil Jackson have it?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The debate will rage on for years, long after the results are in and a legitimate case can be made one way or the other about the job Phil Jackson will do as the boss of the New York Knicks.

The initial surge from the hire has subsided, just a bit, and as the Knicks’ last-gasp effort to unseat the Atlanta Hawks for the eighth and final playoff slot in the Eastern Conference plays out, it’s a good time to restart this conversation.

Plenty of experts have weighed in, most of them no more qualified to dish on the prospect of Front Office Phil than they claim Jackson is for a job in the front office after making his championship bones (11 times as a coach and twice as a player) on the other side of the line.

My colleague and Hang Time California bureau chief Scott Howard Cooper, born and raised in Los Angeles and as knowledgeable about the Lakers and their lore as anyone in the business, lit the flame this time, questioning Phil’s credentials (it’s blasphemy, and will get you banned from Original Tommy’s Hamburgers for life all over the Southland SHC!).

I had to come to the defense of the Zen master, anyone who has been the common thread in as many championship situations as he has shouldn’t really need defending … but I had to go there in Jump Ball!!!  …

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 3:00 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: JUMP BALL !!!

I get why Knicks fans and players are excited: because they need any reason to be excited. But all the organization did by hiring Phil Jackson was win the press conference. James Dolan did something popular for a change and brought in a superstar. But Phil is a coaching superstar, not a front-office success. He has a lot to prove to earn this attention in the new job.

On Mar 28, 2014, at 1:48 PM, Smith, Sekou

You get Knicks fans, huh? They’ll boo you at the Garden for even suggesting something like that. The Phil factor is much like the Bill Parcells factor was in the NFL, his mere presence alone signals bigger things to come for whatever franchise he is working with. Seriously, ask folks in Dallas and New England. The Knicks need someone who can be held accountable for the big picture vision of the franchise. It doesn’t take a genius to come up with a plan … but if you can get one, why not?

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 5:43 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

Would you like a straw or will you drink the Kool-Aid straight from the jug? His mere presence doesn’t signal anything other than the Knicks willing to spend a lot of money. “Bigger things to come” is a slogan, not based in fact. Phil is a brilliant basketball mind. I think, if anything, he is underrated as a coach. I am a fan. But they did not hire coach Phil Jackson. They put someone in charge of basketball operations who has not worked in a front office. And if it’s such a thin line from one job to the other, let’s see how people react when New York names R.C. Buford or Sam Presti or Masai Ujiri head coach. There will obviously be others handling the day-to-day work while Phil handles the big picture and deals in final rulings. But the Knicks are a tangled mess, from salary cap to the roster itself, and he has to get a lot of things right before the Knicks can say they’re at bigger things.

On Mar 28, 2014, at 2:56 PM, Smith, Sekou

Actually, I prefer one of those fancy Camelbak adult sippy cup/water bottles when drinking my Kool-Aid, Scott. You know how I do it. Seriously, though, you are selling Phil short and the job of a general manager in this league way long. I won’t run down the list of knuckle-draggers who have been general managers in this league the past 40 years or so, but there haven’t been a ton of Hall of Famers to speak of in that regard. And to suggest that anyone’s success in the NBA isn’t rooted in equal parts blind luck and superior personnel is a farce. You can’t mention R.C. Buford or Sam Presti without also mentioning Tim Duncan and Kevin Durant, the cornerstone/Hall of Fame(caliber in Durant’s case) talents that their organizations are built around. I’m not saying those guys aren’t good at what they do. I’m just saying their jobs are much more manageable because of the personnel in place. Presti was no one’s genius before Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and James Harden came into their own. And he’d be the first one to shoot down that label. Phil deserves some time and the benefit of anyone’s doubt right now based on his Lord of the Rings status alone.


VIDEO: WRick Fox discusses the nuances of Phil Jackson’s system and how it will work in New York

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 6:10 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

Then let’s do it this way: What has Phil done to win you over? Are you basing his success as a GM on what he did as a coach? (And, again, I’m the last guy who sells him short. I’m the one who said he was underrated as a coach. He is an all-timer. But that’s a different job.)

On Mar 28, 2014, at 4:37 PM, Smith, Sekou

Seriously! We’re haggling over Phil’s credentials to do a job that has been bequeathed to the children of owners, former agents, guys who have graduated from the video room and folks whose credentials pale in comparison to what the Zen master has accomplished in his storied career. Coach or GM, it doesn’t make much difference to me when we’re talking about management style. Phil’s style has produced unmatched success everywhere he’s been. So he didn’t take the GM training course. Folks have to get over that and let’s see what he can do.

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Saturday, March 29, 2014 1:08 AM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

So your argument that Phil Jackson is a good hire is centered on “There have been plenty of bad hires before”? And we’re not haggling. We’re having a discussion in the loftiest of all debate societies: the sports media.

On Mar 29, 2014, at 12:06 AM, Smith, Sekou <Sekou.Smith@turner.com> wrote:

Don’t put words in my mouth … er, on my email, or whatever. What I’m saying is this, for you or anyone else to doubt Phil Jackson’s ability to do this job is shortsighted. You clearly have not embraced the Zen! I’m simply a believer in the power of experience. And no one interested in running a franchise has more championship experience than PJax!

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Saturday, March 29, 2014 4:19 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

Experience is great. And Larry Bird successfully made the transition to head of basketball operations without previously working in a front office, so it can be done. But Larry Legend had two advantages. He was very familiar with the personnel after coaching the Pacers. And, Indiana was a good team. Bird had to make adjustments to a stable situation. Jackson doesn’t need to make adjustments. He needs to marshal an overhaul. The Knicks are a mess of salaries and personnel. He will be relying heavily on others for scouting and for cap management. I don’t think I’m being shortsighted. I’m being practical. Phil was a winner like few others, but that was Zen and this is now. He has to prove he can deliver in a new job. Don’t swoon over a GM because of his coaching record.

From: Smith, Sekou
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2014 6:51 PM
To: Scott Howard-Cooper
Subject: RE: JUMP BALL !!!

You’re making this about all of these other guys and not about Phil. Does he have to prove himself as a GM? Sure. Just as all of those other guys did. But you’re acting like all of the work he’s done in the game hasn’t prepared him for this next step and I think that’s ridiculous. I’m not saying Phil is perfect and can wave his magic Zen wand and fix all of the problems facing the Knicks. But whatever issues arise, they won’t be foreign to Phil. He’s worked in championship situations and has the benefit of that vast experience to use in his new role with the Knicks. Don’t knock a guy as a GM before we give him some time to dig in on the job.

From: Scott Howard-Cooper

Date: March 29, 2014 at 11:35:28 PM EDT
To: Sekou SMITH
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

I hope he does well. I just think it’s fair to be skeptical. If he proves it, if he delivers big results, great. But let’s let him prove it.

From: Smith, Sekou
Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2014 7:38 AM
To: Scott Howard-Cooper
Subject: RE: JUMP BALL !!!

I knew I’d get you to come around to my side. And I agree, it’s fair to be skeptical. Just as it’s fair to assume, based on his lengthy history, to give Phil the benefit of the doubt we might not give someone else who doesn’t own more championship rings than fingers!


VIDEO: Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas talks Phil, the Knicks and the fit

Phil Jackson’s first move in New York?

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com




VIDEO: The Knicks have won a season-high six straight games

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The New York Knicks’ optimists would tell you that the mere prospect of Phil Jackson joining their beloved team as the president of basketball operations has inspired a season-high six-game win streak.

Who knows? There might be something to that … the power of Zen is strong in Jackson.

In reality, the Knicks are just riding the ebb and flow of completely predictable season of unpredictability. When we assume these Knicks are ready for a dirt bath, they rise up and surprise us. And just when we’re ready to assume that they’re poised to give serious chase for that eighth and final spot (currently occupied by the Atlanta Hawks and their 3.5 game lead over the Knicks) in the Eastern Conference playoff chase, they’ll crash and burn in the coming days.

That’s why the focus in New York has to be on Phil and his first move(s) as boss of the Knicks. I know Mike Woodson has his heart and mind set on grinding to the finish and stealing that playoff spot from the Hawks. But it’s of little consequence to just about everyone else involved.

Jackson, of course, has more important matters to consider. He has Carmelo Anthony‘s future with the franchise to consider. He has Woodson’s future to consider as well. My suggestion, cut bait with one and build with the other. And I think it’s safe to assume that it’s easier to build around Anthony, something that wasn’t done strategically with this current Knicks team, than it is to mold and shape the philosophy of a proud coach like Woodson, who is a branch of the Larry Brown coaching tree.

Gauging the general mood of the Knicks, there seems to be genuine excitement about Jackson taking over. Melo called it a “power move” and lauded the Knicks for going after and landing the greatest winner the game has seen, coach or player, since Bill Russell.

“I’m a chess player. That was a power move right there. You know what I mean?” a smiling Anthony told reporters after a win over the Milwaukee Bucks. “So, now we’re going to see what’s the next move, but that was a great power move.”

Getting a buy-in from Anthony is the first order of business for Jackson. And he shouldn’t have a hard time convincing Anthony to get on board with the plan (provided there is one already mapped out), what with the $30-$34 million more the Knicks can pay him than he could stand to make in free agency.

As for future plans, this will be the most challenging endeavor in Jackson’s career. He had Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen as foundation pieces in Chicago, Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant in Los Angeles. Finding a competent and quality supporting cast for future Hall of Famers isn’t necessarily easy to do, but it is decidedly different challenge compared to crafting a championship roster around Anthony.

Is Anthony’s Horace Grant or Brian Shaw or Rick Fox or Ron Harper already on the roster? It’s hard to tell. I could see Tyson Chandler being a player Jackson would like to keep around, but Amar’e Stoudemire, Raymond Felton and some of the other current high-dollar Knicks don’t seem to be good fits. We know that second superstar is not on the Knicks’ roster right now, so that’s already a huge void that must be filled by Jackson.

Jackson’s presence, in theory, has already led to that mini-surge mentioned earlier. Anthony swears by it, as Ian Begley of ESPNNewYork.com pointed out:

“Phil knows what to do, how to build teams, and how to win,” Anthony said. “That’s the most important thing. When you know how to win — whether you’re a coach, whether you’re in the front office — that stands out.”

Anthony said all of the speculation surrounding Jackson helped the Knicks focus in recent days. New York has won a season-high six in a row, including a 115-94 rout of the Bucks earlier Saturday.

“It’s not a distraction at all,” he said. “If anything, it made us come together more as a team, as a unit, to really kind of keep that on the outside. We’re excited and happy that it got done, instead of all the speculation that’s been going on. So finally, it’s signed, sealed and delivered.”

Jackson, one of the most brilliant basketball minds of all-time, has every reason to be cautious in his approach to reshaping the Knicls. But I would suggest that he be as aggressive as possible in taking this current roster apart. This group clearly does not operate with the same chemistry and synergy that it did a year ago, albeit with seven new faces added to the mix this time around.

Woodson didn’t suddenly become a bad coach during training camp this season. And Anthony, who was lauded for his relentless work a season ago, didn’t wake up this season with selective amnesia about his role.

That said, there is a chance Jackson will want to go in a different direction in both instances. He might want one of his own in that crucial position he knows so well. Woodson, of course, is saying all the right things …

“Anytime you can get a great basketball mind that comes into your organization, I mean, it can’t do nothing but help,” Woodson said. “I mean, Phil’s been through the ringer. He’s won titles. He’s dealt with players individually. He’s dealt with players as a team. I mean, there’s probably not a lot he hasn’t seen from a basketball standpoint, so I think it’s got to be a plus.”

Woodson’s words of praise might not matter. He’s under contract next season, but there was rampant speculation before Jackson came on board that his job security was dwindling and that he might be replaced at season’s end.

Anthony is the sort of high-scoring anchor Jackson-coached teams have been built around in the past. But no one will confuse Anthony for MJ or Kobe. He’s a great scorer and an extremely hard worker but not the sort of dynamic alpha dog that Shaq or those other guys were and, in Kobe’s case, still are.

It requires an exquisitely manicured plan, but letting Anthony test the free agent waters might be just the sort of escape hatch Jackson needs to restart the Knicks in a different image.

No one knows for sure what his plans are. But it’s safe to say Phil Jackson’s first move or series of moves with the Knicks will be telling. We’ll know much more about Front Office Phil after he starts chipping away than we do now.



VIDEO: The Inside crew discusses Phil Jackson and the Knicks