Posts Tagged ‘Al Attles’

Attles, several others saluted by Hall


VIDEO: Al Attles is being awarded the John. W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – He accepted a job teaching at a junior high school in his hometown of Newark, N.J., coming out of North Carolina A&T and figured he’d play in the Eastern League for fun on weekends. That’s how sure Al Attles was he had no real future in basketball.

He packed for one week when he set off for Hershey, Pa., and training camp as a Philadelphia Warriors rookie in 1960. That’s how sure Attles was he would have a short NBA life.

And now look. The teaching thing never worked out. And that short life in pro ball turned into 54 years with the same organization, leading to Attles being saluted tonight with the John W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award from the Hall of Fame, the highest honor from the basketball museum short of enshrinement.

Attles played for the Warriors for 11 seasons, averaging 8.9 points, 3.5 rebounds and 3.5 assists. He coached them for 13, resulting in six playoffs berths, two division crowns, the best mark in franchise history (59-23 in 1975-76) and the only championship in the West Coast era, the 1975 Finals win over Washington. He was general manager for three more seasons.

Now a community ambassador and a beloved member of the organization, he will be recognized as part of the Hall of Fame festivities that culminate with induction ceremonies for the Class of 2014 on Friday night at Symphony Hall.

“Alvin Attles contributed over 50 years to the Warriors and to the game of basketball,” John Doleva, the president of the Hall said when the honor was announced in February. “He impacted the lives of so many as a player, coach, ambassador and executive during his NBA tenure. We are honored to recognize coach Attles with this prestigious award.”

Others being saluted the next two days, in addition to Alonzo Mourning, David Stern, Mitch Richmond, Sarunas Marciulionis and Bob Leonard, in the Class of 2014:


VIDEO: Nathaniel “Sweetwater” Clifton highlights

Nat Clifton, with induction via the Early African-American Pioneers of the Game committee. Clifton played for the Harlem Globetrotters and for eight seasons in the NBA, averaging 10 points and 8.2 rebounds. Also in the Black Athletes Hall of Fame, he passed away in 1990.

Guy Rodgers, with induction via the Veterans committee. Rodgers led Temple to a pair of Final Four appearances, was a unanimous All-America in 1958 and played 12 seasons in the NBA, twice finishing first in assists. He passed away in 2001.

Nolan Richardson, with induction via the North American committee. Richardson coached Arkansas to the 1994 national championship and three Final Fours as part of a career that also included an NIT title at Tulsa, a junior-college crown with Western Texas and a college coaching mark of 509-207.

Gary Williams, with induction via the North American committee. The Maryland coach made 11 consecutive tournament appearances in the 1990s and 2000s, won the national championship in 2002, led teams to seven 25-wins seasons and finished 668-380.

Immaculata University, with induction via the Women’s committee. The school won three straight AIAW championships, from 1972 to 1974, while going 60-2 and became the first women’s team to play a nationally televised game. The roster included three future members of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame: Theresa Shank, Marianne Crawford and Mary Scharff.

Joe Gilmartin (print) and John Andariese (electronic), with the Curt Gowdy Media Award. Gilmartin was a columnist for the Phoenix Gazette for more than 30 years, wrote for the Suns’ website, was the team’s television analyst in the 1980s and was voted Arizona sportswriter of the year a record 16 times. Andariese has been a color commentator on Knicks games since 1972, when he teamed with Marv Albert, later joined TVS, ESPN, Turner, did radio broadcasts and currently handles Knicks duties for MSG Network.

Former referee Bob Delaney and former Charlotte owner Robert L. Johnson, with the Mannie Jackson-Basketball’s Human Spirit Award for “striving to improve the community, making a commitment to others, hard work and embracing the core values of the game.” Delaney, a former New Jersey State Police officer who worked undercover to fight organized crime, was cited for his work in providing awareness and education on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Johnson, the co-founder of Black Entertainment Television, is saluted for his philanthropic work.

‘Run TMC’ crew in rarefied HOF air

By Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com


VIDEO: ‘Run TMC’ takes a closer look at one of Golden State’s magical eras

They were together just three seasons. It seems like they ganged up on opponents for longer, but, no, just three seasons of sending scoreboard operators to the injured list with finger and hand disorders, before a trade brought things to an abrupt end, followed by a lifetime of wondering what could have been if Golden State’s Run TMC era had remained intact.

There was always something forever about the Warriors of T(im Hardaway), M(itch Richmond) and C(hris Mullin) and Don Nelson the mad-scientist coach, encouraging, not merely allowing, Manute Bol to fling 3-pointers from about the back of his neck. Now there officially is.

The Hall of Fame is expected to reveal Monday that Richmond, along with Alonzo Mourning, will be part of the Class of 2014. This comes after the February announcement that favorite TMC sidekick, Sarunas Marciulionis, will also be enshrined this summer. He’ll join Mullin (a 2011 Hall of Famer) and Nelson (2012) in Springfield, Mass.

Three players and the coach from the Warriors of 1989-90 and 1990-91 will be in the Hall. It is the kind of rarified air usually reserved for the Lakers and Celtics, with a strong case to be made that the point guard Hardaway could be the fourth player to go with the shooting guard (Richmond), small forward (Mullin) and reserve swingman (Marciulionis). Even better for Golden State? This party will include former coach and current community ambassador Al Attles, as beloved within the organization as any person is with any franchise in the league. He’ll be there to receive the John W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award, the highest honor from the basketball museum short of enshrinement.

For all the historical significance, those Warriors who tried to lure opponents into track meets and cause trouble with freakish matchups — 6-foot-7 Tom Tolbert on 7-foot-1 David Robinson, anyone? –went just 37-45 and 44-38 and won one playoff series. The defense, or what passed for one, wasn’t going to allow any long postseason runs, a common theme for years to come in Oakland. But what has turned into a near-annual statement from the anonymous Hall voters suddenly puts the Dubs of the late-80s/early-90s into a unique stratosphere.

“It’s a hotbed of basketball,” Mullin said of the Bay Area. “It really is. It’s great for the fans because a lot of nights and a lot of years, they cheered us on unconditionally. I would say this, though. That wasn’t a bad culture after all. You hear about ‘New culture, new culture.’ That wasn’t too shabby. Mitch hopefully is in. I’m sure Tim’s going to get in through this process. That’s not a bad culture. I think that’s a very proud franchise through the years, from Wilt Chamberlain to Nate Thurmond to Al Attles, to Rick Barry, Tom Meschery. You talk about the last championship, it was Al Attles (as coach). Let’s not forget that. The guy’s still there. So it’s a rich, proud franchise. I think we should praise what’s going on now. But it wasn’t too shabby.”

Just Mullin saying hello to Joe Lacob.

Lacob bought the team in 2010 with declarations about a fresh start, comments Mullin understandably took personal since he had been the general manager who put together most of the Warriors of the time. Lacob was talking about the management team led by predecessor Chris Cohan and the annual disappointment in the standings. But Lacob also had frequent references to building a roster around toughness and defense while getting away from the run-and-gun crew from Mullin’s days as basketball operations boss. So point taken. There was never a shot at the history of the franchise and, in fact, it was Lacob who provided the long-overdue honor of retiring Mullin’s jersey No. 17.

But three players and the coach from the same team in the Hall of Fame is a rare sighting, even if Marciulionis is there for his international play with the Soviet Union and Lithuania. The part about the basketball hotbed is about the Bay Area as a whole, from the youth leagues to the pros, a history underlined in Springfield as well: enshrinement for Richmond, Marciulionis and former Philadelphia and San Francisco Warrior Guy Rodgers this year.

Oakland native Gary Payton (2013), Nelson, former Warrior Jamaal Wilkes and Berkeley native Don Barksdale (2012), and Mullin and Stanford women’s coach Tara VanDereveer (2011). And that doesn’t count Mullin as part of the collective Dream Team induction (2010) or ex-Warriors Ralph Sampson and Bernard King.

Moving forward, Hardaway will be high on the rankings for most deserving in the next election, along with Kevin Johnson, who played practically next door to Oakland at the University of California, and, if someone nominates him, ex-Warrior Chris Webber. Jason Kidd, an Oakland native who also played at Cal, will get his ceremony in 2018, barring unexpected developments.


VIDEO: Mitch Richmond reflects on his Golden State days

Attles Still A Warrior, Many Years Later

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The plan coming out of North Carolina A&T was to be a teacher. Al Attles had even accepted a job, at a junior high school in his hometown of Newark, N.J. Build a career Monday through Friday, play basketball in the Eastern League on weekends.

The NBA? Hardly. Attles was so sure how that was going to turn out that when he went to Hershey, Pa., for training camp with the Philadelphia Warriors, the team that drafted him in the fifth round in 1960, 39th overall, he packed for one week. He was sure he wouldn’t last any longer.

He lasted longer.

Attles backed out of the junior-high job in Newark because he thought he was going into the military, joined the Warriors and never left. Literally never left. The franchise relocated from Philadelphia to the San Francisco Bay Area, ownership changed hands many times, he has switched jobs a few times, but that expectation of one week in the NBA has turned into the reality of nearly 53 years in the league.

“Here it is, many, many, many years later, and I’m still getting a pay check from an NBA team,” he said. “I have to shake my head.”

Not only that, he’s receiving it from the same team, a Warrior in 2013 just as he was in 1960.

Attles, as a player, was known as “The Destroyer” for his hard-nosed approach in 11 seasons of 8.9 points, 3.5 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 711 games, fifth-most in franchise history. Attles the coach was known as a champion, running the sideline for the only title in the club’s West Coast era that began in 1962-63, the 1975 Finals win over Washington. His 13 years as coach resulted in six playoff berths in all, two division crowns, the best mark in franchise history (59-23 in 1975-76) and two All-Star games.

Attles then served as general manager for three more seasons, and still the connection didn’t end. He became part of the community relations department and a popular connection between the team and the Bay Area, eventually to have the current title of Ambassador with another former Warrior, Nate Thurmond.

“Things just kind of worked out,” Attles said. “I’m a big believer in being in the right place at the right time.”

He would have gone to a different high school in Newark if he lived across the street, but ended up at Weequahic and with the basketball coach who would become one of the biggest positive influences of Attles’ young life.

He had the opportunity to attend bigger colleges closer to home – Seton Hall, St. John’s, NYU – but chose North Carolina A&T despite never having been farther south than Washington and being concerned about how an African-American would be treated. He believed the people at A&T were genuinely concerned about his education and liked the idea of a smaller campus having smaller classrooms and better interaction with teachers. The same Attles who wandered through high school academically made honor roll at the Greensboro, N.C., campus.

And then the ultimate intersection of opportunity: Being drafted by the Warriors.

Those kind of right places at the right time.

Golden State retired his No. 16, one of six players in team history to be so honored. He was inducted in the Bay Area Hall of Fame in 1993. And in 2006, a newly refurbished outdoor court in his adopted hometown of Oakland was renamed Alvin Attles Court.

Warriors Headed Back To San Francisco





HANG TIME PLAYOFF HEADQUARTERS – One of the greatest cities on the planet and one of the greatest fan bases in all of sports moved one step closer to reuniting today with the unveiling of the Golden State Warriors’ plans to move back to San Francisco and into a new arena by 2017, when the team can maneuver out of its lease at Oakland’s Oracle Arena.

The new arena site is near the waterfront in downtown San Francisco on Piers 30-32 close to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, a picturesque location that will provide some stunning views of the Bay Area. This is the latest effort by Warriors ownership, Joe Lacob and Peter Guber, to breathe new life into the franchise and give their fans hope for the future by diving back into their storied past.

Some of the greatest success the Warriors have experienced came during their time in San Francisco. In the nine seasons they called San Francisco home, from 1962-63 to 1970-71, the Warriors had five winning seasons, made the playoffs five times and went to The Finals twice.

This news didn’t shock the fervent fan base that has stuck with the team through the good and bad of the past 50 years, the last 41 in Oakland. When Lacob and Guber took over in 2010, they made it clear that they had plans to shake things up for an organization that has reached the playoffs just once since 1994, and that included a move back to the City by the Bay.

Not only will the new arena be the Warriors’ new home, they’ll be using private funds to build and complete the $500 million project. And it will bring a state of the art facility to downtown San Francisco when almost every other professional sports team in the area resides outside of the city limits.

“This is more than just a basketball arena,” Lacob said at the news conference attended by the likes of NBA Commissioner David Stern, California’s Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom and Warriors greats Al Attles and Nate Thurmond, among others. “This is a live entertainment arena.”

Said Guber: “We had one mission today; a world-class venue.”

Warriors executive and the NBA logo himself, Jerry West, made sure to mention that he’d seen new arenas built in Los Angeles, twice.  There is an energy and excitement that’s associated with these sorts of projects, he said, one that attracts fans and also players that want to enjoy the latest and greatest facilities the game has to offer.

“If I were a player,” West said, making his best pitch while trying to avoid the wrath of the commissioner, “this would be my resting place if I were a free agent.”

If the final result looks anything like the artist renderings, there will be no need for a hard sell from any Warriors executives. The Warriors will have the most breathtaking venue in the league. And if Lacob and Guber have their way, they’ll also have a team to match up with that venue.

Wilt Stamp Takes Lickin’, Keeps Tickin’

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It probably would be seen as a cheap shot to write something like, “Contrary to NBA Hall of Famer Karl (The Mailman) Malone, the United States Postal Service is failing to deliver …”

Those of us here at the Hideout never would want to (ahem) antagonize any situation by assigning blame for anything. So let’s just say that, like a lot of husbands who wind up sleeping a few nights on their couches, the USPS is about to let an anniversary slip by without acknowledgement.

Less than two months from now, the NBA and hoops enthusiasts around the globe will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the most astounding single performance in league history: On March 2, 1962, Wilt Chamberlain led the Philadelphia Warriors past the New York Knicks on a neutral court in Hershey, Pa., 169-147. Al Attles and the other Warriors combined to score 69 points. Chamberlain got the other 100.

It is a record that stands to this day – a grand, round number for one of the biggest performers ever in sports (never to have run in the Kentucky Derby, anyway). The Dipper’s Herculean feats and outsized personality seemed ripe for him to be honored by casual fans and the culture at large, and what better way than to put his image on a first-class U.S. postal stamp?

That was the passion that moved Donald Hunt, longtime sportswriter at the Philadelphia Tribune in Chamberlain’s hometown, to throw his support into a campaign to get the big fella so honored. An online petition sprang up to lobby the Citizen’s Stamp Advisory Committee at the USPS’s own hideout in Washington, D.C. Stories appeared here at NBA.com, as well as in USA Today, the mainstream Philadelphia media and elsewhere.

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