OKC’s Durant ‘taken off floor,’ return uncertain


VIDEO: Thunder GM Sam Presti on shutting down Durant

Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City’s All-Star forward and the NBA’s 2014 Most Valuable Player, has been shut down from basketball activity by the team due to continued soreness in his surgically repaired right foot, with no timetable for his return.

Thunder general manager Sam Presti announced the decision, taken as a precautionary measure and in response to Durant’s discomfort, in a Friday morning media session. “Right now, we’ve decided to take him off the floor so the people who are the experts can make the [medical] determination,” Presti said. “When he’s able to play without that soreness, he’ll be back on the floor.”

Durant, 26, played in just 27 of the Thunder’s 68 games heading into the matchup against Atlanta in Oklahoma City. He missed the season’s first 17 games after fracturing his foot in the preseason, returned for nine, then was sidelined for six more.

The four-time NBA scoring champ, also enduring a sprained ankle and a sprained toe, returned to action Dec. 31 and played in 18 of 22 heading up through the All-Star break in February. But on Feb. 23, Durant had a second surgery to replace a screw in his right foot and has not played since.

Durant has averaged 25.4 points, 6.6 rebounds and 4.4 assists in 33.8 minutes. Currently No. 8 in the Western Conference, the Thunder has gone 18-9 in his 27 starts vs. 20-21 in the games Durant has not played.

And as if OKC doesn’t have enough injury news, it will be without center Enes Kanter tonight against the Atlanta Hawks.

Morning shootaround — March 20


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played March 19

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Durant held out of practice | Report: Spurs might pursue Grizzlies’ Gasol | Gordon apologizes for Suns talk in 2012

No. 1: Durant held out of practice with Thunder – A little over a week ago, Oklahoma City Thunder coach Scott Brooks said he expected reigning MVP and team star Kevin Durant to return to the lineup in a week or two. Well, here we are eight days later … does it look like Durant will be suiting up soon for OKC? Based on Royce Young‘s report on ESPN.com’s Daily Thunder blog, it sure doesn’t sound like it:

Durant did not practice today, held out with what Brooks called “some soreness,” which is a word I’m quite sick of seeing, personally.

“Experiencing a little bit of soreness,” Brooks said. “That’s expected. We have some peaks and valleys, and we always have a cautious approach, so today he didn’t do anything.”

Eight days ago, Brooks updated Durant’s timetable to return to play in a “week or two.” That followed two one week re-evaluations. So since Durant underwent a second surgery on Feb. 23, he’s missed almost four weeks.

Asked if he’d classify Durant’s soreness as a setback, or how he’d classify it, Brooks worked around the edges of answering that.

“Just he experienced some soreness,” Brooks said. “I think when you go through rehab, we all know through the rehab process you’re going to have some peaks and valleys, and you just have to adjust accordingly. That’s why he was off today, and he’s definitely not playing tomorrow. That’s all part of the process with his rehab.”

Asked directly if Durant’s timetable has changed, Brooks gave maybe the most revealing answer of all.

“I don’t know that yet,” he said. “But we’ll definitely take, with all our players, with injuries we’ll always take the best interest of the player and always take a cautious approach.”

That’s worrisome. Again, Durant was given a timetable of “a week or two” eight days ago, which suggested he would be back soon. Him not practicing today is certainly a step in the wrong direction of returning, and it certainly appears he’s not on track.

Obviously, with all of this Durant stuff, there’s a lot of worry and concern. But I’ll say this: I have every reason to believe Durant will return in the regular season. I have been told repeatedly by those who would know that Durant’s Jones fracture isn’t at risk. It’s about the pain he’s experiencing as a result of the screw head rubbing against a bone for weeks.

 


VIDEO: OKC’s players are readying for a big showdown with the Hawks tonight

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Film Study: Missing Korver

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – In a game between the league’s two best teams, the Golden State Warriors were, by far, the better of the two, beating the Atlanta Hawks 114-95.

And that’s been the case all season, really. While the two teams were just a half game apart in the standings entering Wednesday’s game, there was a big difference statistically. The Warriors led the league in both offensive and defensive efficiency, while the Hawks ranked sixth offensively and fourth defensively.

The Warriors’ lead in NetRtg (point differential per 100 possessions) over the Hawks (5.1) was larger than any No. 1 team has had over the No. 2 team in the last 37 seasons (since turnovers started being counted in 1977). The next largest margin (4.6) belonged to the 72-win, 1995-96 Chicago Bulls.

Both offenses looked great in the first meeting between these two teams, won by the Hawks, 124-116. The difference on Wednesday was on the end of the floor where the Hawks shot 36 percent.

A lot of that open shots that didn’t go in the basket. In fact, you can tell the story of the two head-to-head meetings by just looking at the shooting numbers on uncontested jumpers.

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Kyle Korver’s absence on Wednesday was definitely felt in that regard. Korver has shot 52.5 percent, with an effective field-goal percentage (taking the value 3-pointers into account) of 75.6 percent on uncontested jumpers this season. Both of those marks lead the league among players who have attempted at least 100 uncontested jumpers.

But Korver’s impact on the Hawks’ offense goes well beyond the shots he takes. And it can be seen in a couple of pick-and-roll plays from Wednesday’s game.

Play 1 – Iguodala helps off Bazemore

First, here’s a Shelvin MackAl Horford pick-and-roll on the right side of the floor early in the second quarter on Wednesday. We see Andre Iguodala on the weak side, where he’s guarding Kent Bazemore (hidden in the left corner). Iguodala has his eye on the ball, focused on Horford’s roll …

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Here’s the play, where Iguodala helps off Bazemore to alter Horford’s layup attempt…


VIDEO: Play 1 – Iguodala helps

Play 2 – Holiday helps off Bazemore

Second, here’s a Jeff Teague – Horford pick-and-roll from early in the third quarter, with Justin Holiday guarding Bazemore near the top of the 3-point line …

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When we roll the play, we see Holiday leave Bazemore all alone in order to help on Horford’s roll. And Bazemore can’t make him pay.


VIDEO: Play 2 – Holiday helps

Now let’s rewind to February …

Play 3 – No help off Korver

Here’s a play from the first meeting that was similar to Play 1 above. Dennis Schroder and Horford run a pick-and-roll with Iguodala guarding Korver, who’s parked in the weak side corner …

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As Horford rolls, watch Iguodala turn his head a little bit to see where Korver is. He’s not there to help on the roll and the result is a dunk for Horford …


VIDEO: Play 3 – No help off Korver

Pretty simple stuff. When the league’s best shooter is on the floor, he’s going to make things a lot easier on his teammates. The Hawks use Korver in a lot of different ways to draw the defense’s attention. Here are a couple of examples from a November game against the Jazz …

Play 4 – Setting a screen

On the last play of the half, in semi-transition, Korver sets a sideline screen for Teague …

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Instead of switching onto Teague, Joe Ingles is looking to his right, to fight through a potential screen for Korver …

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So Teague just goes right to the basket. Watch the play here.

Play 5 – Switch = mismatch

In the middle of the third quarter Korver (blue 26) runs off a baseline screen set by Paul Millsap (blue 4), who’s being defended by Enes Kanter (red 34) …

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Instead of waiting for Alec Burks (red 10) to fight through the screen and giving Korver a second to shoot, Kanter switches out on him. That creates a mismatch underneath that Millsap takes advantage of. Watch the play here.

With Korver on the floor, the Hawks’ offense has scored 110.9 points per 100 possessions, a rate that would rank No. 1 in the league. With him off the floor, it’s scored 97.4, a rate that would rank 29th.

The Hawks have a great ensemble cast. Everybody in their starting lineup can shoot and they share the ball like no other team. But Korver’s individual impact is huge and he was sorely missed on Wednesday.

George ‘in’ for USA Basketball camp


VIDEO: USA Basketball wins the gold medal at the 2014 FIBA World Cup

For USA Basketball, preparation for the 2016 Olympics has already begun.

As a result of its gold medal victory in last year’s World Cup of Basketball, the U.S. has qualified for the Rio games and won’t be participating in this summer’s FIBA Americas tournament, where two more Olympic bids will be earned. But the U.S. will bring together staff and players in Las Vegas for a four-day mini-camp in August. Potential Olympians were notified of the camp last fall, and the USA Basketball staff has been in communication with them throughout the season.

There are currently 34 players on the National Team roster. The list includes an initial 28-man pool that was announced last January, as well as six players — DeMar DeRozan, Rudy Gay, Paul Millsap, Chandler Parsons, Mason Plumlee and John Wall — that were added last summer.

It includes MVP candidates Stephen Curry, Anthony Davis, James Harden, LeBron James, Chris Paul and Russell Westbrook, as well as reigning MVP Kevin Durant and Paul George, who broke his leg playing in a USA Basketball exhibition last summer.

This summer’s mini-camp will include another exhibition game at the Thomas & Mack Center on the campus of UNLV, where George snapped his right leg against the bottom of the basket stanchion last Aug. 1. The stanchions at Thomas & Mack have since been replaced by ones that are further from the court.

Though George has been practicing with the Indiana Pacers for three weeks, he has yet to decide if he’ll play this season. But he told NBA.com’s Steve Aschburner on Wednesday that his summer plans won’t change whether or not he plays between now and the end of the Pacers’ season. And when asked about the mini-camp, he was clear that he intends to be there.

“I’m in,” George said. “Of course.”

“The day it happened,” George added, referencing his injury, “right after, I told them I looked forward to continuing on with USA basketball.”   

Morning shootaround — March 19


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played March 18

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Wade, Heat rising fast | Warriors pass big test vs. Hawks | Noah trying to remain optimistic about role, minutes

No. 1: Wade feeling great in Miami – Many may have figured the Miami Heat would fade from the Eastern Conference playoff picture once All-Star forward Chris Bosh was lost for the season due to blood clots on his lungs. But in the 13 games since that news came down, Miami has gone 8-5, which includes last night’s thrilling home win over the Portland Trail Blazers. That win — and much of Miami’s success of late — came courtesy of a fourth-quarter scoring surge by Dwyane Wade, who told ESPN.com’s Chris Wallace that he’s feeling better than ever:

Dwyane Wade credits improved health and a recent change in his workout routine as the driving forces behind his recent surge in production amid the Miami Heat’s push to make the playoffs.

“This is the best I’ve felt in years right now,” Wade said Wednesday. “You question it. And you try not to question it, like ‘Why? Why couldn’t I feel like this the last two years?’ But it is what it is. I’m feeling like this now, when I need it individually to (carry) more of a load to help this team.”

The quiet moment of reflection for Wade came as he sat in his locker after he scored 32 points to help rally the Heat late in a 108-104 victory against the Portland Trail Blazers. It was the seventh consecutive game Wade has scored at least 25 points, marking his longest such streak since eight in a row in 2010.

Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said the team’s strategy has been simplified in recent weeks as Wade started to regain his form after dealing with three separate hamstring injuries before the All-Star break.

Wade has averaged 29.1 points and shot 53 percent from the field over the last seven games.

“He understands the moment right now,” Spoelstra said of his expectations for Wade. “We don’t have to talk about it. It’s, ‘Here’s the ball. Make a play for the team.’ Quite frankly in the fourth quarter, the best offense really was to get the ball to Dwyane and let him create some kind of action.”

With LeBron James back in Cleveland and Bosh sidelined for the rest of the season to recover from blood clots in his lungs, the bulk of the leadership and production has shifted to Wade. An 11-time All-Star in his 12th season, Wade said he recently started his workout routine a few hours earlier than normal on game nights and has been spending more time on the court with assistant coach and former NBA forward Juwan Howard to simulate the bigger defenders he faces on switches.

But the ultimate source of Wade’s success is his health. He reached toward the side of his locker Wednesday night and knocked against the wooden frame, having played in 14 of the past 15 games. Wade leads the league in fourth-quarter scoring after adding 15 of his 32 in the final period Wednesday, including the Heat’s final eight points of the game.

“It feels good, man,” said Wade, who is averaging 21.8 points, 5.2 assists and 3.7 rebounds in 49 games. “I’ve taken a lot of criticism and I’ve worked very hard on my body to get to the point where I know, fourth quarter, it shows. That means a lot to me. When everyone is tired, I go up a notch. And for an old guy, that’s not bad at all to have that extra level to go to.”


VIDEO: Dwyane Wade knows he must drive Miami’s playoff push 

***  

Pippen recalls MJ’s return

Think back to 20 years ago and so many of our now commonly used words that didn’t exist yet:

— Blog.

— Google.

— Mashup.

— Bromance.

Then think back to exactly 20 years ago today and two of the most famous words ever uttered in sports:

“I’m back.”

With that short, sweet phrase, Michael Jordan shocked the world by coming out of retirement to return to NBA. Two decades later, teammate Scottie Pippen took to Twitter — another word that hadn’t yet been invented — to provide some insight into the impact on the Bulls.

Even Pippen didn’t think it would ever happen.

After three straight titles, the 1993-94 season was a dramatic change for those left behind.

While the rest of the Bulls tried to carry on with him, Pippen admits to keeping one eye on the baseball diamond.

But they all knew things had changed when Jordan put down his glove and bat and started hanging around the gym again.

Then came maybe the most famous fax in history:

It was odd to see him wearing jersey No. 45 instead of his old No. 23. But he looked like his old familiar self as soon as he walked back into Madison Square Garden for the first time.

They made it back to the Eastern Conference finals, but didn’t have enough to get past Shaq and Penny.

But that just lit the flame under Jordan and with the addition of another colorful Hall of Famer, it was just like old times.

It all added up to a word that had been invented just a decade earlier — another “three-peat.”

Young Has Small Knee Fracture

The end of the season can’t come soon enough for the Lakers, who learned Wednesday that guard Nick Young has a small fracture in his left knee cap and will be re-evaluated on a weekly basis.

Young hopes he will not need surgery and that the fracture will heal with rest. According to Arash Markazi of ESPNLosAngeles.com, it’s uncertain if Young will play again this season:

Young has missed the last 11 games with a swollen left knee and has no played since the Lakers beat the Boston Celtics 118-111 on Feb. 22.

“Nothing,” Lakers coach Byron Scott said when asked what Young was able to do at practice. “He signed some autographs, went back in and got some treatment and that was about it.”

Young is averaging 13.4 points and 2.3 rebounds in 23.8 minutes over 42 games this season.

Young did not practice on Wednesday but was sporting a new hairstyle he said was inspired by Kid ‘n’ Play and Jamie Foxx.

“I felt like it was time for a change,” Young said. “I was watching Kid ‘n’ Play at home and then I started watching Booty Call and I said Jamie Foxx has a nice hairstyle I want to try so that’s the inspiration behind it.”

Scott wasn’t a fan of the hairdo, saying it looked like Young lost a bet.

“It looked like a bunch of worms up there just running around,” Scott said. “When I first saw him I started cracking up, laughing.”

Howard will return with restrictions


VIDEO: The Rockets didn’t fold without Howard

The Dwight Howard watch won’t go on for much longer, according to the man himself.

But while the Rockets center says he’s looking to getting back onto the court soon, it will come with some restrictions. Howard said he won’t play more than 20 to 25 minutes until he plays his way back into game shape after missing the past 23 games with a swelling in his right knee. He also won’t play in back-to-back games.

The Rockets have three sets of back-to-back games left on their schedule, the next coming March 29-30 at Washington and Toronto.

“It sucks being injured and trying to come back from an injury,” Howard told reporters following Wednesday’s team workout. “When people see you they say, ‘Oh he looks good,’ and sometimes they don’t understand the whole process. I’m happy the rehab process is almost over with and I can get back on the floor and join my team.”

Howard took part in his first full practice with his teammates in nearly two months on Monday, but has taken the last two days off for rest and treatment. He said there is no pain in the knee, just achiness.

The goal is to be healthy and fully ready for the playoffs, which begin on the weekend of April 18-19.

“I will be back when I feel I am in the best shape but also my body is healthy enough to play and maintain myself,” Howard said. “I know a lot of people want me to play and I want me to play as badly as anybody but the important thing is to make sure this doesn’t happen again because we want to make a deep push in the playoffs this year and I can’t afford to  miss any playoff games.”

Howard is averaging 16.3 points, 11 rebounds and 1.4 blocked shots in 32 games this season, all equaling his lowest numbers in at least nine years, and has not played since Jan. 23.

Haley’s passing has McIlvaine shaken, recommitted


VIDEO: Remembering Jack Haley

Jim McIlvaine never much worried about his body or the toll his NBA career was taking on it. When the 7-foot-1 center from Racine, Wis., walked away from the league in 2001 after seven seasons with Washington, Seattle and New Jersey, it was a decision driven by his heart, not for his heart.

But Jack Haley‘s unexpected death Tuesday at age 51, reportedly from heart disease, as the latest in a series of recent NBA alums who have passed away, had McIlvaine feeling unusually mortal. And blogging about it, one way he spends his time when not working as a broadcast analyst for Marquette University basketball or with Optima Batteries in Milwaukee.

It wasn’t long ago that McIlvaine ran into Haley, the journeyman who played nine seasons with the Bulls, Nets, Lakers and Spurs, on the Las Vegas Strip:

What I do remember is that Jack looked great. He looked fit, he looked happy and during our conversation, it sounded like everything was going well for him. That was just a few months ago. Fast forward to this evening and I noticed a tweet from Detlef Schrempf in my feed, mentioning Jack’s passing. It seems like just the other day I was blogging about the passing of Jerome Kersey and now I find myself asking the same questions- How could it happen? Why Jack? Why now?

McIlvaine turned his distress over Haley’s passing — along with others such as Kersey, Anthony Mason, Dwayne Schintzius, Yinka Dare and a few more —  into a mirror to assess his own post-NBA retirement days. His verdict? Not horrible but not great either.

I know people die young all over the world for a multitude of reasons, but I guess I don’t expect it to happen so often among guys who were some of the world’s elite athletes. I’ve put on some weight since retiring, but 20 pounds is easy to hide on a seven-foot frame. The greater concern for me is my heart. While I had what I would consider an “active” lifestyle for most of my life, in recent years, I’ve become more sedentary. That, combined with some advice from my doctor several years ago, has heightened my awareness for my physical well-being.

I was actually working out with Marquette, when I went in for a physical and was told my cholesterol level was higher than my doctor would’ve liked. She encouraged me to exercise more and I thought to myself, “How much more can I exercise, than chasing around a bunch of college kids?!”

McIlvaine took up triathlons and got so heavy into biking that he required hemorrhoid surgery. It hit him how difficult it is, with a body battered by years of pounding and general basketball demands, to maintain a level of activity like typical 30- and 40-somethings.

With Jack’s passing, it got me thinking about the first time the retired NBA players held their annual summer meeting in conjunction with the current NBA players. It was an eye-opening experience for me and one that I felt gave me an opportunity to look into my own future as a retired player, at least from a physical standpoint. There were guys at that meeting in their 50s (and maybe even 40s), who were hobbling around like they were in their 70s or 80s. I didn’t want that for myself and decided I wouldn’t continue playing until my body would no longer allow it. I know I’m not alone in that regard and when I see guys like [NFL 49ers linebacker] Chris Borland walk away from professional sports, I’m only surprised that it doesn’t [occur] more often.

Adding Jack’s passing to the growing list has made me re-evaluate how I’ve dealt with moderately-high cholesterol in much the same way I did when I first met the retired NBA players. Up until now, I’ve preferred to make dietary adjustments, pop red yeast rice tablets and try to exercise more. The first two efforts have gone well and made a significant difference, but I never seem to find enough time to exercise consistently. I’ll be making a renewed commitment to exercise more, but perhaps more importantly, I’ll be calling my doctor tomorrow for the Lipitor perscription she’d previously-suggested.

McIlvaine, 42, is nine years younger than Haley. He left the NBA at a much younger age (28) than Haley (34), as much for how poorly it fit him psychologically as for any physical toll. At 7-foot-1, he just happened to stand eyeball-to-eyeball with Shaquille O’Neal, Tim Duncan and the league’s other big boppers; that didn’t mean he enjoyed it.

Between the rigors of the league and the hypercriticism he faced over a then-staggering seven-year, $33 million contract he got from the Sonics in 1996, McIlvaine lost his taste for the NBA.

But he hasn’t lost his zest for life in general and Haley’s passing, along with the others, has prompted him to do something about it.

Blogtable: The rest issue …

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Kyrie’s 57 or Klay’s 37? | The rest issue … | Brighter future: Knicks or Lakers?



VIDEOThe Starters address the issue of resting players

> It’s a trend now, resting players who are healthy and able to play. Sure, coaches should do what’s best for their team. And yes, fans deserve to see the best players. So what can be done about this, moving forward?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Wait, don’t you know I’m sitting out this “blogtable” question? Two out of three on any given day is a hectic pace and I’m tuckered … OK, here are four suggestions, any of which I’ll happily take credit for if implemented: First, cut the preseason down by 10 days (four tune-up games are plenty) so the regular season can start earlier, sprinkling those days into what used to be four-in-five-night grinds. Second, encourage teams to lighten players’ loads on practice days, travel days and off days. Third, let coaches know that shorter minutes in more games is preferable to zero minutes in some; ticket buyers ought to have a fair chance of seeing both teams’ stars play, say, 24 minutes. And fourth, if all these rest provisions are adopted, mandate that marquee players will play in marquee games (i.e., TNT, ABC and ESPN dates). Those are the nights the NBA sells itself to casual fans and broadens its appeal.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Until both sides — owners and players —  come together for the good of player health and the quality of the game and sacrifice a slice of the gobs of money they take in to play a reduced schedule of, say, 66 to 72 games, everything else is just hot air. The solution is simple. But billionaires and millionaires won’t give up a dollar, which is why all we get is yammering and lineups that should make the league ashamed.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com Nothing. It’s just a new fact of life. Not a good one once lottery-bound teams start sitting players to make sure they are rested for the offseason, compared to the understandable reason of wanting to be ready for the postseason, but I don’t think anything can be done. I’d love to hear the suggestions. Any attempted clampdown would merely encourage coaches to perfect stretching the truth. “My starting center woke up with a sore back. Prove me wrong. By the way, my starting point guard stayed home because of some pressing personal business that needed his full attention. Call his wife if you don’t believe me.” It creates more problems than it solves.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com If coaches want to rest players, fine, I guess that’s accepted nowadays. But pulling a Steve Kerr and sitting four-fifths of your starting lineup is over the top. Stop the madness at that point. What’s really weird is players, this deep into the season, rarely if ever practice. Which means they get days off and nights off? Klay Thompson is 25 and healthy and he needs a breather? You can’t put a player out there for at least 15 minutes? Have some respect for the game, at least, and confine your “rest” to one starter per night, if you must. And Adam Silver, please trim the schedule to 75 games, dump the preseason altogether, return to best-of-five for the first round … and convince the owners that less games and revenue is better for the sport (good luck with that one).

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: It really sucks for fans who bought tickets to that particular game to see those particular players. If I lived in Denver and bought tickets for last Friday’s game against Golden State because my kid was a big Stephen Curry fan, I’d be pretty ticked that Stephen Curry didn’t play. Maybe the league can allow fans to exchange those tickets for another game. But resting players will continue to be a smart strategy for good teams who are thinking about the big picture, unless the season is shortened. Fewer games (72 has always been my suggestion) would both allow for more rest and make each game more important.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: A heavy-handed approach will only make things worse. No coach wants to be told how to manage his team. So the league should stay above that fray and institute some general guidelines for resting players who don’t have significant injuries. You want an age limit? How about no one under the age of 30 gets a night off for rest? I could operate on four hours of sleep for six days before my 30th birthday. Rest later, when you are old and cranky. No rest for players on losing teams, never … EVER! And if the integrity of the game means anything, these teams with the blatant maintenance programs must go back to the camouflage of the “sore back” and “tendinitis” as the serial excuses for guys missing games.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: More efficient scheduling can help reduce the wear on players. But I believe this trend of resting players is to be encouraged, actually, because it shows fans that the heart is in the right place — that teams are more concerned with winning games and contending for championships than they are focused on the negative business impact. Isn’t this what fans want — for winning to come first?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: The only way coaches will be convinced to stop sitting guys is if somehow they realize that sitting these guys, for whatever reason, isn’t what is best for their team. What it reminds me of, to be honest, is the way the Atlanta Braves used to handle resting their players during the stretch run. They’d qualify for the postseason with weeks left, rest guys the last few weeks of the season, then hit the postseason with a roster full of guys who were out of sync and out of rhythm. Resting and focusing on preventative maintenance is great, in theory. But you can’t turn the magic on and off.