Report: Kyrie Irving could be out until January

 

HANG TIME BIG CITY — Despite advancing to the NBA Finals, the Cleveland Cavaliers never really got to see what their team would like with everyone healthy, as they suffered injury after injury. And it may be a while before they see a fully healthy lineup again.

According to a report from Cleveland.com’s Chris Haynes, Cavaliers point guard Kyrie Irving, who suffered a fractured left kneecap during overtime of Game 1 of the NBA Finals, may not return to the Cleveland rotation until January, if it takes that long for Irving to recuperate.

Writes Haynes…

Multiple league sources say his rehabilitation is going smoothly, but that the chances are slim of him being in the opening-night lineup against the Chicago Bulls on Oct. 27. One source said he could very well be unavailable up until January.

When the three-time All-Star underwent surgery in early June, his recovery time was set at 3-4 months. Assuming he is sidelined outside of that four-month window, the thinking is that it would have everything to do with the Cavaliers being patient and cautious rather than the injury not healing.

The Cavaliers want to bring him back slowly without risking a setback, with the goal of being at full strength entering the playoffs.

At his basketball camp in July, Irving said, “I’m honestly not putting a date on anything. People are going to put a date regardless. I’m just continuing to be on the journey I’ve been on, and that’s continuing to get better every single day and rehabbing my leg.”

Darryl Dawkins dead at 58


VIDEO: The Inside the NBA crew remembers Darryl Dawkins’ backboard dunks

HANG TIME BIG CITYDarryl Dawkins, the supersized NBA big man with an even larger personality, died today at the age of 58, according to the New York Daily News.

In 1975, the 6-11 Dawkins was drafted directly out of high school in the Orlando area with the fifth overall pick by the Philadelphia 76ers, making Dawkins the first prep-to-NBA player in history. He was athletic for a man his size, but his youth required a few years of development before he could play regularly. Dawkins broke into Philadelphia’s rotation in the 1977-78 season. As the Sixers, led by Julius “Dr. J” Erving, established themselves as contenders in the NBA’s Eastern Conference, Dawkins became a starter and established post presence.

In 1982, the Sixers traded Dawkins to the New Jersey Nets for a first-round pick, where in 1983-84 he averaged a career-high 16.8 points per game. After missing most of the 1986-87 season due to injuries, Dawkins had stints with the Utah Jazz and Detroit Pistons, but wasn’t able to stay healthy enough to contribute regularly. Dawkins played several seasons in Italy, and then a year with the Harlem Globetrotters before retiring.

Dawkins showed tantalizing flashes of brilliance, but struggled to sustain that type of brilliant play. This was perhaps best exemplified by Dawkins during 1979, when Dawkins broke backboards during slam dunks two different times. (He later claimed to have also broken two backboards in Italy.)

Dawkins seemed to have an innate understanding of the type of self-promotion that many players didn’t embrace until years later. Dawkins went by the nickname “Chocolate Thunder,” which was purportedly selected by Stevie Wonder, and Dawkins claimed to hail from the planet Lovetron. After shattering a backboard above Kansas City Kings forward Bill Robinzine, Dawkins named the dunk, “The Chocolate-Thunder-Flying, Robinzine-Crying, Teeth-Shaking, Glass-Breaking, Rump-Roasting, Bun-Toasting, Wham-Bam, Glass-Breaker-I-Am-Jam.”

In recent years, Dawkins dabbled in broadcasting and coached in several basketball minor leagues, and most recently coached at Lehigh Carbon Community College. He was also a fixture at the NBA’s annual All-Star Weekend events, always wearing vivid suits.

Those suits may have been colorful, but they could never match the personality of the man himself.

Morning Shootaround — Aug. 27

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Kobe, Shaq express regrets | MKG signs extension with Hornets | Stoudemire has high hopes for himself, Heat | Carrying on Lloyd’s legacy

No. 1: Kobe, Shaq express regrets Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant teamed up on the Lakers to win three championships, but their publicly contentious relationship sometimes seemed as through they won despite each other instead of because of each other. But in Shaq’s new podcast being released next week, Kobe Bryant visited as a guest, and as ESPN’s Baxter Holmes writes, the two looked back on their relationship and the dissolution of it with some regret…

In the podcast, “The Big Podcast With Shaq,” the two expressed regret over the feud.

“A lot of stuff was said out of the heat of the moment,” O’Neal said in an excerpt from the podcast that was played on ESPN Radio on Wednesday. “I guarantee I don’t remember a lot of stuff that they said, because I changed my thought process of, you know what, we won three out of four, what the hell are you all talking about? This is not really even a story.”

Said Bryant: “Here’s the thing, though. When you say it at the time, you actually mean it, and then when you get older you have more perspective, and you’re like holy… I was an idiot when I was a kid.

“To me, the most important thing was really, ‘just keep your mouth shut.’ You don’t need to go to the press with stuff. You keep it internal, and we have our arguments and our disagreements, but I think having our debates within the press was something I wish would’ve been avoided. But it did kind of create this whirlwind around us as a team with myself and Shaq and the press and the media that just put so much pressure on us as an organization.”

***

No. 2: MKG signs extension with Hornets The Charlotte Hornets and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist have supposedly been talking about a contract extension for a few days now, but yesterday they finally inked the five-year deal, which allowed both sides to meet the press. Hornets coach Steve Clifford has high goals for Kidd-Gilchrist, who explained to the Charlotte Observer‘s Rick Bonnell that he figured why wait to play for another contract?

Charlotte Hornets small forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist might have made some more off his second NBA contract by waiting until he reached restricted free-agency next July.

Instead he chose the security of a four-year, $52 million extension in a place and with a franchise that have become his home.

“Why wait?” Kidd-Gilchrist said at a Wednesday news conference to formally announce the signing. “I’m learning from the best. I don’t do this for the money.”

Perhaps not, but his second NBA contract will make the No. 2 overall pick in the 2012 draft fabulously wealthy. Also Kidd-Gilchrist has some upside protection in the contract’s terms. A source familiar with the deal said Kidd-Gilchrist has a player option for the final season, so if his improvement coincides with the anticipated spike in the salary cap, he could become an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2019.

Kidd-Gilchrist would still be 25 – young by NBA standards – at that juncture.

Wednesday was a highly emotional day for Kidd-Gilchrist and his family. His mother frequently dabbed away tears during the news conference. He thanked numerous people including team owner Michael Jordan, the coaching staff and his family and agents.

“I’m learning from the best: MJ, Coach (Steve Clifford), Patrick Ewing, Mark Price,” Kidd-Gilchrist said.

Price, now coaching the Charlotte 49ers, was the Hornets assistant who worked diligently two summers ago to fix Kidd-Gilchrist’s jump shot. Price and Kidd-Gilchrist became so close through that experience that Kidd-Gilchrist skipped a team flight last season, flying to Washington later in the day at his own expense, to attend Price’s introductory news conference at UNC Charlotte.

Price returned that respect Wednesday, attending Kidd-Gilchrist’s news conference.

While Kidd-Gilchrist is still developing offensively (he averaged 10.9 points and 7.6 rebounds last season), he’s among the NBA’s top wing defenders. He told the Observer last season he aspires to be the best defender in NBA history, and didn’t back off that goal Wednesday.

“Aim for the stars; you’ll probably land on the moon. I have confidence in myself,” Kidd-Gilchrist said.

***

No. 3: Stoudemire has high hopes for himself, Heat Amar’e Stoudemire has spent a decade in the NBA, and gone from being a high-flying transition player into a more traditional, savvy post presence. After joining the Dallas Mavericks for their playoff run, Stoudemire signed with the Miami Heat, which he considers a return home. And as Stoudemire explained to the Associated Press, he believes the Miami Heat could have championship potential

He’s been texting and talking with Chris Bosh regularly. He’s considered himself close with Goran Dragic for years, going back to their time together with the Phoenix Suns.

Plus, he’s called Miami home for about seven years already.

So getting acclimated to being part of the Heat, that won’t be a big deal for the forward who will be entering his 14th NBA season – and first with Miami – when training camp opens in about a month. He knows many of his new teammates such as Dwyane Wade, Bosh and Dragic. He knows the city, and most of all he thinks that he can rekindle the All-Star form he had not long ago.

“We can be a really good team,” Stoudemire said. “No one thought that the Golden State Warriors would be champions this time last year. We knew they’d be a really good team, but no one thought they’d be world champions. With us, we know we’re a really good team. No one thinks we can be world champions, but you never know.”

Stoudemire went back to school on Monday, appearing with some other members of the Heat staff at an elementary school in Fort Lauderdale on the first day of the new academic year in South Florida.

He posed for photos and helped hand out some school supplies to ecstatic kids in what essentially was his first public appearance for the team since signing a one-year, $1.5 million deal last month. He also had to introduce himself to a few students; one asked Stoudemire if he was Bosh.

“I just live life,” Stoudemire said.” I try to enjoy it. I try to create positive energy when I can, I try to affect people in a positive way and just live life.”

For the kids, the new season of sorts started Monday.

For Stoudemire, while it won’t officially start for a few more weeks, prepping for 2015-16 in reality started long ago. He’s taking care of his body, but also said he believes that Heat President Pat Riley and coach Erik Spoelstra have the right formula to both extend the careers of veteran players while also getting the best from them.

“From playing against Miami, the thing that you learn is that they always have a competitive spirit,” Stoudemire said. “There’s an aura around here that everyone works hard, that you have to be in top shape which is great because I want to be in the best shape of my life going into this season. I want to surprise the world and have a very, very productive year.”

***

No. 4: Carrying on Lloyd’s legacy Back in 1950, Earl Lloyd became the first African-American to play in the NBA, as a member of the Washington Capitols. Lloyd passed away in February at the age of 86, but his son is working to make sure Lloyd’s legacy isn’t forgotten by attempting to have him commemorated on a postage stamp. As Donald Hunt writes in the Philadelphia Tribune, Kevin Lloyd and his family have a long process to go through

Lloyd is an excellent candidate to have his image on a postage stamp. Basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain was immortalized on two limited edition Forever postage stamps on Dec. 5, 2014 making him the first basketball player to have his likeness on a stamp.

The stamp process is quite grueling. The Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee is an organization appointed by the Postmaster General. The CSAC selects the stamp subjects for future consideration. The group submits them to the postmaster general who approves the subjects and designs for all U.S. postage stamps. The CSAC receives thousands of suggestions each year.

Nevertheless, the U.S. Postal Service has approved stamps for a number of athletes such as Jackie Robinson, Larry Doby, Althea Gibson, Jesse Owens, Wilma Rudolph and others.

In 2003, Lloyd was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass. for integrating the NBA.

“Earl Lloyd was a true pioneer in the game as a breakout player, a coach, and an administrator who at every level led the integration of the professional game,” said John Doleva, president and CEO, Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in a statement. “He had a great love and respect for the game and used his success and challenges within it to educate and motivate so many others to achieve at the highest level. His remarkable basketball career aside, he was also one of the greatest and most decent human beings to represent basketball and the game was fortunate to have him at its forefront.”

Letters supporting Kevin Lloyd’s campaign should be mailed to: Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee, 475 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Room 3300, Washington, D.C. 20260-3501.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Jordan Clarkson is not yet eligible to represent the Philippines, but the process is underway … Russell Westbrook had fun at the Taylor Swift concert in Los Angeles … LeBron James sold his waterfront home in Miami …

Morning Shootaround — Aug. 26


VIDEO: A look at which ’12 draftees are next up for an extension

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Clippers penalized for first Jordan meeting | Curry will be free | Augustin reflects on Katrina | Blazers starting over

No. 1: Clippers penalized for first Jordan meetingDeAndre Jordan‘s free agency was quite the saga, featuring many emojis, a camp-out at Jordan’s house, and ultimately, a change of heart. Before that change of heart, Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was fined $25,000 for publicly discussing the team’s deal with Jordan. And now, the Clippers have been fined 10 times that amount for discussing a possible endorsement deal in their initial meeting with Jordan. Mark Medina of the L.A. Daily News has the story, also tweeting that the endorsement deal was with Lexus

The NBA determined in its investigation that this aspect of the Clippers’ presentation had no impact on Jordan’s decision to re-sign with the Clippers. But that did not stop the NBA from issuing a fine. The NBA’s anti-circumvention rules prohibits teams from providing any compensation for a player unless it is included in the player’s contract.

The specifics regarding the Clippers’ third-party endorsement opportunity isn’t entirely clear. But an NBA source familiar with the teams said the Clippers presented a “hypothetical deal” that was nearly worth the amount of the league’s $250,000. Since then, the NBA source said Jordan did not take advantage of any possible endorsement opportunity.

In a memo to Clippers employees (acquired by the Orange County Register), owner Steve Ballmer said that the violation of the CBA wasn’t intentional…

As I shared with everyone on day one of purchasing the Team, being part of the Clippers family means operating with the highest integrity. We believed we were doing this the right way, and any circumvention was inadvertent. In our effort to support our players in every way possible, we as an organization must be diligent in complying with the CBA.

***

No. 2: Curry will be free — MVP Stephen Curry said Monday that free agency isn’t appealing, but that doesn’t mean that opportunities won’t be presented to him in the summer of 2017. The Mercury News’ Tim Kawakami explains…

So when Curry says he’s not into free agency at the moment, again, that’s important and it’s logical, because he’s happy here and knows Joe Lacob and Peter Guber will be more than ready to pay him a max starting salary of $30M once July 2017 arrives and Curry hits free agency, presuming good health and all the things we have to presume over the next two seasons.

My point, though: Curry has to hit free agency in order to qualify for the $30M salary.

He has to let his current contract expire, has to play it out, even if he has every intention of re-signing with the Warriors at the first possible instance.

Which means there’s some outside chance that Curry will look at other options because… why not? The Warriors might not be coming off a 67-win season and a title in two years… other issues might prop up… other teams will surely be ready to pay him the max they can and then… who knows?

Kawakami also looks at a potential Harrison Barnes contract extension …

Kidd-Gilchrist might possibly be more valuable–younger, can really, really defend, if he ever figures out a jump shot he could be a long-time All-Star.

However… Barnes is only 23 and he already has a long history of carrying the Warriors through periods in huge playoff games, and yes, that includes Games 4, 5 and 6 vs. the Cleveland Cavaliers on the way to the Warriors’ first championship since 1975. That is rather important.

I’m not saying Barnes is a finished product or even one of the Warriors’ top three or four players.

But with the cap exploding, $14M per won’t be as large an investment as it looks now.

***

No. 3: Augustin reflects on Katrina — This week marks the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which took more than a thousand lives and affected countless others. Thunder point guard D.J. Augustin, who was a high school senior in New Orleans at the time, reflects on his experience in a first-person account in The Player’s Tribune…

Before Katrina was Katrina, it was just another hurricane that hadn’t arrived yet. The week before Katrina hit, everyone was worried about Hurricane Ivan. Ivan was supposed to be really big. There was mandatory evacuation a few days before it got there. So we actually evacuated the week before Katrina — and then again one week later. We put the evacuation plan into effect: My mom, dad, two sisters and myself piled our luggage into our Chevy Trailblazer. We left New Orleans headed for Houston, with a car pool of relatives — my aunts, cousins, and two sets of grandparents all in different cars ahead of us and behind us. It was like a parade. Everyone had the same plan. It usually takes five hours to get to Houston, but it took us 24 hours that time. Everyone was trying to get out of New Orleans at the same time.

I still remember that evacuation for Hurricane Ivan so well. One reason is that it was kind of a false alarm for Katrina. Ivan was never as big as they said it was going to be. My dad was driving our car and the air outside was so humid. We had the windows down – he cut off the air so the car wouldn’t run hot — and I had my shirt off. It was bumper to bumper traffic the whole way. We stayed in a Houston hotel for a couple nights, got to swim in the hotel pool, and then returned home. It just felt like a family trip, like a little getaway. When we got away like that for those hurricanes, it was kind of fun at the same time, because nothing ever happened really, out of all the years we got away for hurricanes. Like previous evacuations, it was just a precaution.

Little did we know, way out in the Gulf of Mexico somewhere, Katrina was on its way.

***

No. 4: Blazers starting over — If you look at each team individually with a positive outlook, you can think of a reason or two why 29 of the 30 could be better this season than they were last year. The one exception is the Portland Trail Blazers, who lost four of their five starters to free agency this summer. The downfall started with Wesley Matthews‘ Achilles injury, but when LaMarcus Aldridge left for San Antonio, Blazers GM Neil Olshey had little choice but to push the reset button. Our Scott Howard-Cooper digs into Portland’s second rebuild in the last four years …

Neil Olshey didn’t blow up the Trail Blazers. He is sure of it. He is also right, if that detail matters. An injury with an impact that never could have been imagined followed by a bad playoff series followed ultimately by a franchise crossroads of a decision is to blame.

Except that detail may not matter. Someone has to be accountable for the most-wincing offseason in the NBA, for that crater where the roster of a Western Conference contender once stood, and Wesley Matthews’ previous left Achilles’ tendon is not a candidate. Brandon Roy and his knees, Greg Oden and his knees — been there, felt that.

“I think initially people were kind of caught off guard,” Olshey said of the summer developments. “I think people just assumed we’d be in a position to bring LaMarcus back. It’s my job to kind of look beyond that and do what’s best for the long-term health of the franchise. Our goal was to bring LaMarcus back. We were in the mix. He chose to take his career in another direction. But what we weren’t going to do was compound a negative situation and make it worse by signing long-term contracts and taking away flexibility for a team that, quite honestly, wasn’t going to be good enough.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Pacers believe a new practice facility will help them compete with the rest of the leagueChris Andersen isn’t worried about a possible trade (to get the Heat out of paying the repeater tax) … Andrei Kirilenko is the new president of the Russian Basketball FederationKlay Thompson is an experienced traveler … and teammate Andre Iguodala took his trophy to Tokyo.

ICYMI: Rookies show Lang Whitaker their dance moves:


VIDEO: Lang With the Rooks: Signature Dance Move

Report: Pearl Washington hospitalized with brain tumor


VIDEO: Pearl Washington

HANG TIME BIG CITYDwayne “Pearl” Washington, former New Jersey Nets and Miami Heat point guard, is hospitalized in Syracuse, NY, awaiting surgery on a recurring brain tumor, according to a report from Syracuse.com.

According to Syracuse.com, Washington first received treatment for a brain tumor in 1995. As Bud Poliquin writes…

Washington, 51, will have surgery at Crouse Hospital on Thursday. He has been reluctant to speak publicly about the recurrence of the tumor, his friend Mark Finney said, “because he’s a very private person.”

Mark Finney is the son of Betty Finney, a Cortland woman with whom Washington had formed a deep, abiding friendship over the years. Washington gave the eulogy at Betty Finney’s funeral in July.

As for news about his own health, Washington “wants to keep it as low-key as possible,” Mark Finney said. But Finney and Washington understand that because of Pearl’s place in SU basketball history, word had started to leak out about his condition.

Washington has received visitors in his hospital room, Finney said. Those visitors have included Orange assistant coach Mike Hopkins, who stopped by Monday to see the former point guard.

“He’s having a great day today,” Finney said by telephone Monday afternoon. “He’s much more relaxed. He’s taking everything in stride and he’s grateful for all the support he’s getting.”

Washington, said Finney, is facing a “very serious” medical procedure this week.

“Many prayers are requested,” Finney said. “Pearl has prayed for a lot of people over the years and we’d ask that you please pay back those prayers to Pearl.”

A native of Brooklyn, Washington played at Syracuse, where he was a consensus All-American averaging 15.7 points and 6.7 assists over his Syracuse career, where he displayed a crowd-pleasing style on the floor during the 1980’s heyday of the Big East Conference.

But as brilliant as his collegiate career was, Washington couldn’t sustain that success in the NBA. Washington was drafted 13th overall in the 1986 NBA Draft by the New Jersey Nets. After two seasons with the Nets, the Miami Heat selected Washington in the expansion draft. Washington played one season with the Heat, averaging 7.6 points and 4.2 assists over 54 games, before being released.

As Washington told the New York Times in 2003: ”I had a God-given talent and I was always ahead of everybody else in high school and in college. But when I got to that next level, guys were above me. So at that point, you have to say either ‘I’m going to work at it to become a good player in the NBA,’ or, ‘This ain’t for me anymore.’ I decided that it wasn’t for me. I didn’t love it enough to really work hard at it anymore. But I have no regrets.”

Morning Shootaround — Aug. 25


VIDEO: Nerlens Noel 2014-15 highlights

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Hornets extend Kidd-Gilchrist | Chris Paul remembers Hurricane Katrina | Noel working on jump shot

No. 1: Hornets extend Kidd-Gilchrist The Charlotte Hornets drafted Michael Kidd-Gilchrist second overall in the 2012 NBA Draft, largely based on the potential of Kidd-Gilchrist continuing to develop into a complete small forward. And while three years later he still has a ways to go offensively, Kidd-Gilchrist has been a great fit for the Hornets, and become one of the best defensive players in the league. Which is why the Hornets were so keen to sign Kidd-Gilchrist to a four-year contract extension, writes Rick Bonnell in the Charlotte Observer

The Charlotte Hornets have made sure Michael Kidd-Gilchrist is a Charlotte Hornet long-term.

The Hornets have agreed to a four-year, $52 million contract, sources confirmed Monday. The deal will keep him off the free-agent market, similar to when the Hornets signed point guard Kemba Walker to a four-year, $48 million contract a year ago.

Kidd-Gilchrist is considered the Hornets’ defensive stopper. Coach Steve Clifford has called him one of the best individual and team defenders in the league.

However, he lacks offensive prowess. He averaged 13.4 points and 9.4 rebounds and took no 3-point shots last season. Then-assistant coach Mark Price spent much of last summer improving his jump shot.

The Hornets were under a certain economic pressure to get this deal done. Three other rookie-scale extensions had been completed: Anthony Davis was signed for five years and $145 million, making him the highest-paid player in NBA history. Portland’s Damian Lillard got a 5-year, $120 million contract.

And most recently Jonas Valanciunas got a four-year, $64 million contract from the Toronto Raptors.

***

No. 2: Chris Paul remembers Hurricane Katrina Back in 2005, the New Orleans Hornets used the fourth overall pick in the NBA Draft to select Chris Paul out of Wake Forest. Paul arrived in New Orleans a decade ago this summer eager to make an impact on the franchise and the city. And as Arash Markazi writes, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans 10 years ago this week, having a lasting effect on one of America’s great cities

Paul’s first memory of Aug. 29, 2005, was the sound of his mother’s voice waking him up and directing him to the television. The images were hard to fathom as he rubbed the sleep from his eyes.

“It was one of the most devastating things I had ever seen,” Paul said. “That was my new home. Even though I had only just gotten drafted, it was going to be my first time away from home and I felt a connection to the city. I couldn’t believe what I was watching.”

Hurricane Katrina had struck New Orleans that early Monday morning, and as Paul huddled in front of the television with his family, he looked at his older brother and wondered what the future held for him and his new home.

“That was the most uncertain time of our lives,” C.J. [Paul] said. “Chris had just been drafted and closed on a house … he’s just getting a feel for the city and all of a sudden that new city you love is in trouble. Just to see all the people who were affected by it and to know we were there just a few days before it hit …

“It seemed like it was a third world country we were watching on TV,” C.J. added. “It didn’t seem like it was a place in the United States we were due to live in in a week.”

While Paul and his family watched Katrina’s wrath unfold on television, the experience of going through it left deeper wounds for those living in the city. Jim Cleamons, who was an assistant on head coach Byron Scott‘s staff, says he and his family still have emotional scars from Katrina 10 years later.

“It was a horrific experience,” Cleamons said. “To some degree, I don’t want to remember some of the things myself.”

***

No. 3: Noel working on jump shot After sitting out his rookie season to recover from a knee injury, Sixers center Nerlens Noel came close to averaging a double-double last season. But Noel is looking to improve on the offensive end, and is spending his summer in Rhode Island rebuilding his jump shot, writes Keith Pompey for Philly.com…

Noel spent the month of June here before joining the Sixers at the Utah Jazz and NBA summer leagues in July. Then he returned in August.

Of course, Noel could be doing this at the Sixers’ practice facility at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

“Yeah, I could,” Noel said Wednesday night over dinner. “But I felt individualizing this for myself, putting all the attention on myself, working on something up here . . . I thought this is a little more dedication to be in Newport,R.I., where there isn’t too much going on.”

While his physique won’t be confused with Dwight Howard‘s, Noel’s muscle gain is noticeable.

The 21-year-old weighs about 223 pounds, up from the 217 he carried last season. Mainly, Noel has worked on his jump shot, which has been his Achilles’ heel.

“A lot of people say work on your weaknesses until they become strengths,” Carroll said, “because in the NBA if you have weaknesses, people will exploit them.”

If he improves his shooting, Noel’s ability to get to the rim will improve as well.

“I think it’s really going to help me as a basketball player overall, especially at [power forward],” Noel said of the daily workouts. “[It will] help space the floor with my ability and start hitting the jumper consistently and complement our whole offense. And, you know, just changing my whole game and how effective I am.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Utah Jazz have agreed to a multi-year deal with Jeff Withey  … Spurs assistant coach Ime Udoka may have been their secret MVP in their pursuit of LaMarcus AldridgeAndre Drummond has offered Pistons rookie Stanley Johnson a place to live next season … The Lakers have had “casual conversations” with Metta World Peace about a reunion … Could Nick Young join the Australian National Team? …

Report: Kidd-Gilchrist to sign extension

Through the years, the Hornets have not exactly had overwhelming success with top draft picks.

Emeka Okafor, Raymond Felton, Adam Morrison, D.J. Augustin, Gerald Henderson.

But they’ve definitely got a keeper in Michael Kidd-Gilchrist and that is evidently what they’re going to do. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports says the Hornets are finalizing a four-year, $52 million contract extension with their small forward.

The agreement will be finalized this week with a news conference to follow, league sources said.

As a member of the 2012 NBA draft class, Kidd-Gilchrist is eligible for a rookie extension prior to the start of the 2015-16 season.

Kidd-Gilchrist, the No. 2 overall pick in the draft, has developed into a cornerstone player for the Hornets at small forward. With the extension, the Hornets and Kidd-Gilchrist will avoid him becoming a restricted free agent next summer.

Kidd-Gilchrist averaged 10.9 points and 7.6 rebounds while also becoming a key to coach Steve Clifford’s defense last season.

Report: Lakers talking World Peace

The next thing you know Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak will be pulling up to the parking lot at Staples Center and tossing the valet his keys to the DeLorean.

In what could only be green-lighted in Hollywood as Back To The Future 4, now comes word that the Lakers are talking to Metta World Peace about a possible return to the franchise.

According to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports, the Lakers are discussing signing World Peace to a one-year contract.

No deal has been agreed upon, but there have been talks between the Lakers and World Peace’s representatives, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

There are varying degrees of interest within the Lakers organization about bringing him back to the franchise at 35 years old, although the idea has been met with enthusiasm from Lakers star Kobe Bryant, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

World Peace has been in the Lakers’ practice facility this offseason playing against the team’s players, including 2014 first-round pick Julius Randle, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

What’s wrong with the idea? Only that World Peace is now 35 years old and the last time he was seen in the NBA, he was no longer an elite defender. In fact, not much of a defender at all. He averaged 4.8 points and shot 39.1 percent in 29 games before getting waived by the Knicks. He played last season in China and Italy.

What’s wrong with the idea? Only that with 37-year-old Kobe Bryant sure to suck up much of the oxygen in the lineup, the Lakers’ move into the real future behind the threesome of Jordan Clarkson, D’Angelo Russell and Julius Randle will only be delayed or derailed by the addition of another geezer like World Peace to the lineup.

Just in case they’ve lost their calendars in Lakerland, it’s no longer 2010, McFly.

Curry: ‘Free agency isn’t appealing’

With the MVP trophy in one hand and a huge piece of the 2015 NBA championship in the other, Stephen Curry doesn’t exactly have to look beyond his backyard for professional satisfaction.

With his image staring off TV screens, magazine pages and 10-story video boards in Times Square, he doesn’t need to fly the coop to cash in on earning potential either.

So never mind that he’ll be the fifth-highest paid player on the Golden State team in 2015-16 and never mind that the salary cap is expected to go through the roof over the next two seasons due to the influx of whopping TV money. Curry, the bargain of the league at just over $11 million for next season, says he’s quite happy in the Warriors brotherhood and doesn’t plan on becoming the focus of a wild bidding war when he can become an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2017.

In an interview with Jimmy Spencer of The Sporting News on Monday in San Francisco, Curry said the idea of even becoming a free agent isn’t something he’s considering:

“As I am thinking right now, free agency isn’t really appealing to me because I love where I’m at, love the organization I’m playing for, and the Bay Area is home for me and my family,” Curry said.

Curry becomes an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2017 unless he works out an extension with Golden State before then. He remains an absolute bargain for the champion Warriors after signing a four-year, $44 million deal in October 2012 that will pay him $11.3 million this upcoming 2015-16 season and $12.1 million in 2016-17.

“It helps being world champs and you want to continue to build the momentum that we’ve established and I hope to have a huge part of that in the long term,” Curry said in an interview at a golf event to promote Degree Men. “But I think the best approach for me is to try and stay as in the moment as possible.

“Everybody in this league is going to have many decisions to make, and you’ll be in a lot of different situations throughout your career, so in order to enjoy the ride, you kind of have to not get too ahead of yourself and just stay in the moment.”

Nash headed for Suns’ Ring of Honor


VIDEO: Steve Nash top 10 career assists

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Clear the calendar for Oct. 30 if you’re a Steve Nash fan and a fan of the game of basketball.

That’s the night Nash will join Charles Barkley, Cotton Fitzsimmons, Alvan AdamsTom Chambers, Kevin Johnson, Dick Van Arsdale, Jerry Colangelo and others in the Phoenix Suns’ Ring of Honor, the team announced today.

Nash is busy these days serving as general manager of Canada’s senior men’s national team and removed from the day-to-day activities that consumed him for years during his stellar NBA career.

A back-to-back winner of the NBA’s Most Valuable Player award, Nash was at the center of a turnaround for the Suns a decade ago that also helped revolutionize the NBA game. He was a six-time All-Star (eight overall) during his tenure with the Suns and also finished his playing career as the franchise-leader in assists, 3-pointers made and free throw percentage.

Nash will be the 14th member of the Suns Ring of Honor.