Report: Beal to return from injury

HANG TIME BIG CITY — After fracturing his wrist during the preseason, Washington Wizards guard Bradley Beal will make his season debut tonight against the Dallas Mavericks, according to a report from the Washington Post.

Last season, his second campaign in the NBA, the 6-foot-5 Beal averaged 17.1 points per game and teamed with John Wall to give the Wizards one of the NBA’s best backcourts. Thus far the Wizards have replaced Beal in the starting lineup with Garrett Temple and are off to a 7-2 start.

According to the Post

Beal will come off the bench and be on a minutes limit as he works his way back to game action. The slick shooter sustained a non-displaced fracture of the scaphoid bone in his non-shooting wrist in the second quarter of a preseason game against the Charlotte Hornets on Oct. 10. He underwent surgery two days later.

Coach Randy Wittman told reporters Tuesday that Beal’s status would not be decided until Beal was evaluated Wednesday morning, but Beal has worked out the last two nights and participated in live competition Tuesday night without a hitch.

UPDATE, 12:13 p.m. ET: Beal said during Wednesday’s practice no decision has been made yet on his status tonight and he’ll be a gametime decision

Report: Dragic prepping for ‘open’ free agency

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — One of the NBA’s biggest surprises last season was Phoenix point guard Goran Dragic. In his sixth NBA season, the 6-4 Slovenian averaged a career high 20.3 points per game, leading the Suns to a 48-34 record and narrowly missing out on a playoff berth. Dragic was named to the All-NBA third team as well as selected the NBA’s Most Improved Player.

This season, however, the Suns haven’t burned quite as hot. Phoenix is off to a 6-5 start, and while the offseason signing of Isaiah Thomas from Sacramento has given the Suns an embarrassment of backcourt riches, having Thomas, Dragic and point guard Eric Bledsoe on the same roster has triggered some growing pains. As Dragic recently told the Arizona Republic, part of the reason the offense has not clicked is because “there’s only one ball and we’re all point guards.”

Dragic has an option to exit his contract next summer, and while he previously signaled his intentions to stay in Phoenix long-term, the future may not be as clear as it once seemed. According to a report from The Sporting News, Dragic now intends to hit the open market and see what other options are available, which might mean exiting the valley of the Suns.

In September, Suns point guard Goran Dragic told a reporter during the FIBA World Cup that it was his intention to opt out of the final year of his contract this summer and become a free agent — but that he would only do so with the intention of quickly re-signing with Phoenix.

While that might have been the idea at that time, that’s not the case now, as Dragic will have an “open” free agency, league sources told Sporting News. When Dragic opts out and becomes a free agent next July, he will be a sought-after commodity, and while Phoenix would get the first hearing, Dragic will have options.

Among those options, according to sources, would be Houston — the team Dragic left in order to sign with Phoenix in 2012. The Rockets are well-stocked with point guards, but nearly all, including starter Patrick Beverley, can become free agents next summer.

The Lakers also figure to be a potential landing spot for Dragic, a source said — though, to be clear, the Lakers have only about $36 million committed next season with needs at just about every position, and thus are expected to pursue multiple big-name free agents.

Jason Collins announces retirement plans


VIDEO: Jason Collins made his debut with the Brooklyn Nets last season against the Lakers

ALL BALL BIG CITYJason Collins, the first openly gay athlete in the NBA, has revealed his plans to retire. In a column in this week’s Sports Illustrated, Collins says he will announce his retirement tonight in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center, when the Brooklyn Nets host the Milwaukee Bucks (7:30 ET, League Pass). Collins most recently played for the Nets, seeing action last season in 22 games.

Writes Collins:

It has been 18 exhilarating months since I came out in Sports Illustrated as the first openly gay man in one of the four major professional team sports. And it has been nine months since I signed with the Nets and became the first openly gay male athlete to appear in a game in one of those leagues. It feels wonderful to have been part of these milestones for sports and for gay rights, and to have been embraced by the public, the coaches, the players, the league and history.

On Wednesday at the Barclays Center, I plan to announce my retirement as an NBA player. The day will be especially meaningful for me because the Nets will be playing the Bucks, who are coached by Jason Kidd, my former teammate and my coach in Brooklyn. It was Jason who cheered my decision to come out by posting on Twitter: “Jason’s sexuality doesn’t change the fact that he is a great friend and was a great teammate.”

Considering all the speculation about problems I might face within the locker room, Jason’s support was significant. It had been argued that no team would want to take on a player who was likely to attract a media circus from the outset and whose sexuality would be a distraction. I’m happy to have helped put those canards to rest. The much-ballyhooed media blitz to cover me unscrambled so quickly that a flack jokingly nicknamed me Mr. Irrelevant.

Among the memories I will cherish most are the warm applause I received in Los Angeles when I took the court in my Nets debut, and the standing ovation I got at my first home game in Brooklyn. It shows how far we’ve come. The most poignant moment came at my third game, in Denver, where I met the family of Matthew Shepard, a gay college student beaten to death in a 1998 hate crime on the outskirts of Laramie, Wyo. For the past two years I have worn number 98 on my jersey to honor his memory. I was humbled to learn that number 98 jerseys became the top seller at NBAStore.com. Proceeds from sales, and from auctioned jerseys I wore in games, were donated to two gay-rights charities.

Collins, a seven-foot center who played his college ball at Stanford, played parts of 13 seasons in the NBA, and made back-to-back trips to the NBA Finals in 2002 and 2003 with the New Jersey Nets. In 2004-05, Collins posted career highs of 6.4 points per game to go with 6.1 rebounds per game. Later in his career, Collins played for several different teams as a backup center providing depth and leadership.

Morning shootaround — Nov. 19


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Anthony dealing with knee ‘soreness’ | James wants less minutes for ‘Big Three’ | KG hoping Kidd gets warm Brooklyn reception | Cuban takes shot at Lakers

No. 1: Anthony dealing with knee ‘soreness’Carmelo Anthony has played fantastic of late, averaging 30.4 ppg over his last five games. Unfortunately, his New York Knicks are 1-4 in that span, a stretch that includes last night’s failed comeback attempt against the Milwaukee Bucks. After dropping 26 points on the Bucks, though, Anthony revealed to the media that his left knee has been giving him some trouble since opening night. Peter Botte of the New York Daily News has more:

Carmelo Anthony laid on a training table in the visiting locker room for several minutes, his left knee being iced down following the Knicks’ failed comeback bid in a 117-113 loss Tuesday to the Bucks.

Anthony left the court briefly in the second quarter to have his left knee retaped before returning to play 20 of 24 minutes in the second half – and finish with a team-high 26 points in 37:45 overall.

But the $124 million All-Star revealed he’s been playing with some “soreness” in his left knee “since the Cleveland game” on Oct. 30, and acknowledged that he recently “had some (medical) tests” on that leg, although he wouldn’t reveal any specifics.

“I don’t think it’s serious. I’m out there playing. I don’t think it’s that serious,” Anthony said after the game. “My knee was bothering me a little bit. The tape job I had on it, it kind of got wet a little bit. I started feeling it a little bit after that. I cut the tape off on the bench and I started to feel a little bit more pain. I had to come back and get it retaped. It felt better once I got it retaped. I banged my knee when I had to dive on the ball with Giannis (Antetokounmpo), I banged my knee on the floor. It was sore from that point on.

“I’ve just been trying to go through it and play through it and not kind of think about it. Some days are better than others. Today once the tape came off of it, I felt it. When I banged it on the floor, it made it worse.”


VIDEO: The Bucks hold off the Knicks in Milwaukee

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Howard in child-abuse investigation

Rockets star Dwight Howard is the subject of a child-abuse investigation involving an incident in the summer with his son, according to several reports that say Howard admitted he hit the boy with a belt.

Florida authorities did not proceed with charges after initially looking into the case, saying they did not have enough evidence to proceed. Georgia officials re-opened the investigation, NBC News reported, after receiving new information in recent days.

Howard is an Atlanta native.

Howard’s attorney, David Oscar Markus, issued a statement, as reported by USA Today:

“The Florida Department of Children and Families thoroughly examined all of the evidence and determined that the claims of child abuse were not substantiated. The case was closed in September.

“(The child’s mother) Royce Reed is now shopping her baseless allegations to authorities in Georgia after the Florida DCF case was closed. Even though the allegations have already been found to have no merit, when a complaint about the welfare of a child is made to law enforcement, an investigation is commenced. We are confident the Georgia authorities will reach the same conclusion as the Florida authorities. The truth is on our side.

“It is appalling to see a mother use her son as a pawn against his father in attempt to extract money, which is what is happening in this case. While Royce Reed continues on her aimless quest with the media, Dwight Howard will continue to act in the best interest of his children and do whatever is necessary to protect them.”

Mike Bass, the NBA’s executive vice president of communications, told ESPN on Tuesday, “We are aware of the allegations concerning Dwight Howard and are in the process of independently gathering the facts.”

The Rockets’ next game is Wednesday against the Lakers in Houston.

 

Report: Bosh didn’t want ‘pressure’ of title chase with Rockets

You know the old saying: If you can’t stand the heat, stay with the Heat.

That’s pretty much the admission that Chris Bosh made about his decision last summer to turn down the free-agent offer to chase another championship or two with the Rockets.

When LeBron James chose to leave Miami and return to the Cavaliers in July, it was generally believed that Bosh would make a perfect fit with fellow All-Stars Dwight Howard and James Harden in Houston.

The Rockets made Bosh a max offer of four years, $88 million. The Heat eventually got him to stay for their own max of five years, $118 million. And it’s hard to anyone to tell someone else to simply give up $30 million.

But it wasn’t solely about the money. Bosh told Ken Berger of CBSSports.com that after four years of living under the microscope of intense scrutiny in Miami, he was ready to, well, not put so much effort into intensity-filled title chase:

“I could see where people would think that’s an attractive site,” Bosh told CBSSports.com, speaking of Houston, where half the NBA expected him to land back in July. “They were trying to win right away. And I was really happy to be touted that I possibly could’ve been out there. But you know, that doesn’t guarantee anything, and I know that. All that guarantees is a bunch of pressure.”

Before you jump on Bosh for taking the easy way out, consider what the past four years were like for him. He was never the most important corner of the James-Wade-Bosh triangle, except when he missed an open jumper or flubbed a defensive assignment. He had to sacrifice and unlearn key parts of his game to adapt to the more dominant talents and personalities around him. For four years, every day in the life of the Miami Heat was like being on tour with the No. 1 artist in the land.

The perpetual chase, the championship-or-bust environment, the celebrity status afforded basketball’s three-headed monster — all of it wore on James, who spoke often last season of the mental fatigue of pursuing a fourth straight trip to the Finals. Everyone was so busy chronicling James’ every word that they forgot to ask Bosh what he thought.

It wore on him, too.

“It’s incredibly difficult to win a championship,” Bosh told CBSSports.com. “I know that, and I know it’s a whole process.”

The Rockets had pushed all their chips to the center of the table in pursuit of Carmelo Anthony (who chose to stay in New York) and then Bosh, a perfect complement to Howard and Harden. With James gone and with Rockets GM Daryl Morey clearing the runway for Bosh to chase a third ring as the third wheel in his home state of Texas, it all seemed to be a fait accomplit. The Rockets sure seemed to think so.

“Did they?” Bosh told CBSSports.com. “… I think they’re still in contention for it even without me. It’s free agency. It’s a crazy time. It just kind of got crazy real fast and then it settled down completely.”

It did so when Bosh chose to settle down in Miami, a place that he and his family have adopted as “pretty much our second home,” he said.

“I’m familiar with people,” Bosh said. “I know how to get to work. And if there’s traffic, I know the shortcuts. It’s those small things that I really love about the city and I love about being comfortable that guided me back. And you know, if you can make a couple of dollars on the side, then it works out.”

Morning shootaround — Nov. 18


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Jackson helped ‘Melo get on track | Blatt takes blame for Cavs’ loss | Aldridge helped Williams develop Davis | Grizz confident win won’t be overturned

No. 1: Anthony says chat with Jackson helped his offense — The triangle offense is a simple offense on paper, but can be difficult for teams to implement and master. Such has been the case for the New York Knicks this season, but of late, they seem to be turning the corner. In particular, All-Star Carmelo Anthony has seen his offense perk up of late and said a recent chat with the guru of the offense, Knicks president Phil Jackson, helped him immensely. Ian Bagley of ESPNNewYork.com has more:

Carmelo Anthony said a recent conversation with New York Knicks president Phil Jackson helped provide some “clarity” regarding his role in the triangle offense.

Jackson huddled with Anthony prior to last Monday’s game against the Atlanta Hawks.

“We had a great conversation, a very positive conversation,” Anthony said after practice on Monday. “It gave me some clarity whether it was in the system, whether it was things I should do out there for myself, whether it was things I should do out there for the players, for my teammates … I took it extremely well.”

Knicks coach Derek Fisher noted on Monday that Anthony’s had an easier time finding his shot in the offense in recent games.

“It’s just different and it’s taken him a little bit of time to kind of find out how to be his best self but also in a way that allows the offense to work. I just think he’s kind of settled into that more the last few games,” Fisher said a day after Anthony scored 28 points on 14 shots to help the Knicks snap a seven-game losing streak with a win over the Denver Nuggets.

“He may not continue to shoot it for as high a percentage the entire season but I think he just knows where his shots are going to come from, how to get those [shots] but also how to allow the offense to work so his teammates can thrive, as well,” Fisher added.

Earlier in the season, Anthony said he was struggling to find his “comfort zone” in the triangle, noting that nothing felt as if it was second nature. On Monday, Anthony said that he’s getting closer to finding that comfort zone.

“In my mindset, I’m thinking about it as if it’s any offense,” Anthony said. “Go out there and still play my game within the system that’s being implemented. I’m still learning the system, I’m still getting better at it. Each day I’m still challenging myself to figure some things out. I know it’s going to take some time but, as of right now, I’m becoming more comfortable as the days go on.”


VIDEO: Take an all-access look back at the week that was for the Knicks

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Morning Shootaround — Nov. 17


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 16

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Turning toxic in Los Angeles? | Beal is back | Thunder, Rockets combine for ugly battle | Revisiting the ‘Melo trade

No. 1: Turning toxic in Los Angeles? — The Los Angeles Lakers entered this season with high hopes. Sure, the roster wasn’t as strong as it has been in years past, but they had a healthy Kobe Bryant, and if there’s anything we’ve learned through the years, it’s to not bet against Kobe. But the power of positive thinking apparently doesn’t extend to defensive rotations or offensive consistency, as the Lakers have gotten off to a franchise-worst 1-9 start. And last night’s 136-115 loss to the Warriors may portend even worse things ahead, as some players seem to be unhappy with Kobe’s volume shooting while coach Byron Scott wasn’t thrilled with the team’s defense, writes ESPNLosAngeles.com’s Baxter Holmes:

Scott lambasted his team’s effort, saying that he showed video to his players at halftime of them jogging when they should’ve been running. They didn’t change.

“I can fix that, basically, and [I] will starting Tuesday,” Scott said.

That’s when the Lakers will play the Hawks in Atlanta.

“It’s just going to be a very short leash,” Scott said. “If I see, in my eyes, that you’re not giving that effort, then I’ll just pull guys out.”

He added, “I think we have some guys right now, because of some of the injuries that we have, that feel that they’re almost entitled because they’ve got to play. Well, we’re losing anyway, so I ain’t got to play you.”

Then there was Bryant, who scored 44 points on 15-of-34 shooting from the field in 31 minutes. It was his most points since he tore his Achilles in 2013, and it came on a night when he wasn’t sure if he’d play with a viral infection anyway.

Kobe's shot chart vs. Warriors

Kobe Bryant’s shot chart vs. Golden State

But Bryant shot the ball like it was a hot potato, launching it almost the second he caught it, no matter where he was, no matter how contested the shot was.

He shot 13 field goals in the first quarter; the rest of the Lakers shot 15.

He had 24 shots at halftime; the rest of the Lakers shot 32.

At intermission, he was on pace to set a new career-high for field-goal attempts in a game, besting the 47 he shot in November 2002 against Boston.

But for as much as he shot, and for as much as he scored, the Lakers kept falling further and further behind, eventually by as much as 38.

“We look up there, and we see that we’re winning by 30, 40 points, that 44 is really irrelevant,” Warriors backup center Marreese Speights said.

All the while, the Lakers looked far less like a team and more like one player.

In their locker room after, frustration boiled over more than at any point this season — and it was quite clear which direction most of it was aimed.

Said Carlos Boozer: “A lot of times we run a set, but Kobe is extremely aggressive. And then we try to hit the glass, get it off the glass. We’ve got to find a balance. It can’t be lopsided. We’ve got to find a balance.”

Said Jeremy Lin: “The game of basketball is … we’ve got to do it together. It can’t be … if I go into a game concerned about myself, then in some ways that’s detrimental to the team.”

Lin later added, “There’s so many things wrong right now. At the top of the list, I would say communication, trust and effort.”

Bryant defended his volume shooting, using metaphors about crime.

“Obviously I’d rather get guys involved early, but if a purse gets stolen in front of you, how many blocks are you going to let the guy run?” he asked.

“You going to chase him down and keep him in sight yourself or just wait for the authorities to get there, or decide to let him run and wait for the authorities to get there? It’s a tough thing.”


VIDEO: Kobe Bryant talks after the Lakers’ loss to the Warriors  

Cavs and Rockets talk to Wolves about Corey Brewer

Corey Brewer

Corey Brewer is averaging 9.8 points and 1.4 assists in nine games this season.

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Minnesota Timberwolves are one of those teams (see Nuggets, Denver) with a lot of useful players that aren’t necessarily being put to good use.

Corey Brewer has been playing behind Kevin Martin and Andrew Wiggins on the wing, but has played the fifth-most minutes on the team through nine games. He’s a useful player on a good contract, getting paid $4.7 million this season with a player option for $4.9 million next season.

There are a lot of contenders who could use perimeter defense and it appears that the Wolves are taking calls, knowing that they’re not going to remain competitive in the Western Conference with Ricky Rubio sidelined indefinitely with a sprained left ankle.

ESPN’s Marc Stein reports that Minnesota is in “active” discussions with the Cleveland Cavaliers and Houston Rockets regarding Brewer.

The Minnesota Timberwolves, fresh off heavy back-to-back losses in New Orleans and Dallas and in the latest indication of their growing focus on the future, are in active trade discussions with multiple contending teams pursuing veteran swingman Corey Brewer, according to league sources.

Sources told ESPN.com that the Cleveland Cavaliers and Houston Rockets have emerged as the most serious suitors for Brewer, whose arrival would be a notable boost for either team in terms of depth.

Minnesota is believed to be seeking future assets in exchange for Brewer as it tries to accelerate its rebuilding effort in the wake of trading star power forward Kevin Love to the Cavaliers in August.

Both Cleveland (via their Keith Bogans trade to Philadelphia) and Houston (Jeremy Lin to L.A.) have trade exceptions that can absorb Brewer’s salary, so they wouldn’t need to send a player Minnesota’s way.

Cleveland currently ranks 25th defensively and needs all kinds of depth (second-round pick Joe Harris is currently getting 20 minutes a game). But interior defense is more of a problem and with LeBron James playing most of his minutes at small forward, it’s unclear how big of a role Brewer would have.

Trevor Ariza has fit in well with the Rockets, who have the No. 1 defense in the league through Saturday after playing a weak schedule. There seems to be less need for Brewer in Houston, but he’s still quality depth at a cheap price.

The Los Angeles Clippers are another contender who could use a defensive upgrade on the wing, but they probably don’t have the trade pieces to get a deal done with the Wolves.

Magic rookie Gordon out indefinitely with fractured foot


VIDEO: Magic rookie Aaron Gordon does work on both ends of the floor

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – Add Orlando Magic rookie forward Aaron Gordon to the list of players, young and old, who will miss time early on this season due to injury.

Gordon has a fractured fifth metatarsal in his left foot and will be out indefinitely, according to Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel.

Gordon’s suffered the injury in Saturday’s game against Washington. He will be evaluated when the Magic return home from their current road trip, which wraps up Monday in Detroit.

It is unclear whether or not Gordon will need surgery. More from The Sentinel:

Metatarsals are long bones in the foot that run from the base of the ankle to base of the toes. The fifth metatarsal sits on the outside of the foot.

The Magic selected Gordon fourth overall in the 2014 NBA Draft, and he has played in all 11 of the Magic’s games this season, often giving the team boosts with his energy and his one-on-one defense.

Gordon is the second Magic player to suffer a fractured fifth metatarsal in recent seasons. Glen Davis suffered a Jones fracture of the bone during the 2012-13 season and underwent surgery and needed a second surgery a few months later.

Davis made a full recovery.

It’s unclear if Gordon suffered the same type of fracture that Davis did.

Gordon is averaging 5.8 points and 3.0 rebounds in 15 minutes per game.