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Timberwolves honor co-pilot of Lakers’ scary 1960 ‘miracle landing’

Harold Gifford, a co-pilot on the Minneapolis Lakers’ harrowing winter flight that narrowly avoided disaster nearly 55 years ago, was honored Wednesday night by the Minnesota Timberwolves during their home game against Philadelphia.

Gifford, 90, a retired World War II pilot and aviation professional who lives in Woodbury, Minn., wrote about what could have been a league-altering, NBA air disaster in his 2013 book, “The Miracle Landing” (Signalman Publishing).

When the Lakers’ DC-3 plane suffered mechanical breakdowns during a blizzard on Jan. 17, 1960, on a flight back to the Twin Cities – the electrical system shut down, its radio went dark and the instruments and windows in the cockpit began to freeze over – it was Gifford and fellow pilot Vern Ullman who found a cornfield in tiny Carroll, Iowa, that served as an emergency landing strip.

The Wolves were scheduled to honor Gifford and guests during the first half of Wednesday’s game at Target Center as part of their “Heroes of the Pack” program. The tribute caught the eye of Lakers part-owner and president Jeanie Buss, who has become friends with Gifford in recent years.

Buss took to Twitter Wednesday to note Gifford’s tribute in Minneapolis:

Nowitzki walks back ‘dumb’ Hinrich quote


VIDEO: Monte Ellis is fouted by Kirk Hinrich and makes three free throws to force overtime

MILWAUKEE – Dirk Nowitzki felt bad 24 hours later for calling Kirk Hinrich‘s play on Dallas’ Monta Ellis late in regulation Tuesday “one of the dumbest fouls I’ve ever seen.”

It wasn’t as if Nowitzki was revealing any secrets after the Mavericks’ double-overtime victory at United Center – Hinrich owned the mistake and called it “bonehead play” for fouling Ellis at a point when the Mavericks shooting guard was able to go into his shooting motion. The foul – with 1.2 seconds left in the fourth quarter, the Bulls up 108-105, out of a timeout with 4.5 seconds left – sent Ellis to the line for three free throws. He hit all of them to force overtime and, on his way to a game-high 38 points, scored seven of Dallas’ 11 in the second overtime.

Afterward, in a grateful Mavs’ locker room, Nowitzki merely said what thousands in the arena or viewing on TV were thinking. But he felt a little sheepish a day later, given the play his “dumbest” comment got on the Internet.

“I didn’t mean to put my man Kirk on the spot like that,” he said before Dallas’ game at Milwaukee Wednesday. Nowitzki was held out of the Bucks game more for rest than for a sore back that bothered him Tuesday. The veteran 7-footer also sat out Saturday at Philadelphia for rest.

“Kirk’s actually my guy,” Nowitzki said. “We went to dinners before. … It was just an unfortunate play. It was just way too late. They had a chance to foul [Richard Jefferson] when he caught the ball. And they had a chance to foul Monta when he dribbled two or three times up the floor. The situation was just a bad one. It was fortunate for us.

“He’s a good dude. A hard-nosed player. He made two great 3’s right before that to put ‘em in position to win. I have nothing but respect for Kirk Hinrich.”

Toronto’s DeRozan out indefinitely


VIDEO: DeRozan goes down during Friday’s game

DeMar DeRozan had been a remarkably durable player for the Toronto Raptors in his first six seasons, missing just 10 games out of a possible 394 due to injury. He is the only Raptors player to start all 82 games twice, and he has missed only two since the end of the 2012-13 season.

That changes now, per the team’s Twitter report Saturday afternoon:

DeRozan, Toronto’s leading scorer (19.4 points) and minutes-man (33.6 per game), left the Raptors’ game Friday at Dallas at 8:23 of the third quarter with what was called a strained left groin. He wound up going scoreless in the 106-102 loss, only the fourth time in his career and the first since April 11, 2010.

The injury comes as Toronto starts a three-games-in-four-nights trip to face the L.A. Lakers Sunday, Sacramento Tuesday and Utah Wednesday. The 6-foot-7 wing player, who ranked third in the NBA in free throws and free-throw attempts and ninth in field-goal attempts, was averaging 25.2 points in five road games this season.

Toronto is 8-3 in the games DeRozan has missed in his career, including one last April for rest before the playoffs.

Stars align for Wolves’ rookie LaVine


VIDEO: Rookie LaVine carries Wolves over Lakers

There were times Friday night, Zach LaVine admitted, when he caught himself gawking upon Kobe Bryant the way he had in his, well, younger youth, when the 19-year-old was growing up in Washington state and idolized the Lakers scoring star. Fortunately for LaVine, rookie guard for the Minnesota Timberwolves, Bryant never fully made him and his team pay for such star gazing.

In fact, the raw newcomer who spent one undeveloped year at UCLA outscored his hero 28-26 in Minnesota’s 120-119 victory at Staples Center.

When it was over, the teenager who scored 18 points in reserve in the second quarter, had joined Bryant in a bit of NBA statistical history:

LaVine’s 28 points were the third-most by any bench player in the league this season. He joined Kevin Garnett, Stephon Marbury and LaVine’s teammate Andrew Wiggins as the only four Wolves to score 25 or more before turning 20.

This one meant a little extra to LaVine because of where he did it and whom he was facing (Wiggins actually was the Wolves defender assigned to Bryant for much of the game). “I always want to come back and put a show on,” he told reporters after doing just that for about 10 family members and friends. “I know a lot of UCLA fans were here and a lot of UCLA fans are mad that I came out. I’m confident person. I like proving people wrong.”

LaVine still routinely proves some critics and even his coaches right with his unpolished game and mental mistakes. He is averaging 8.0 points, 2.2 rebounds and 2.7 assists in 21.3 minutes, while shooting 42.9 percent, including an ill-advised 27.8 percent from 3-point range.

For all his athletic ability, vertical leap and YouTube wonderfulness, the rookie has only three dunks in 234 minutes, compared to team leader Shabazz Muhammad‘s 13 in 207. And LaVine’s per game plus/minus of minus-8.1 is Minnesota’s worst.

But then, Wolves president of basketball operations Flip Saunders knew LaVine would serve a healthy apprenticeship learning his craft at this level when he drafted him 13th overall last June – and handed him over to head coach Flip Saunders to begin the heavy repetitions of development. Saunders saw point-guard potential in LaVine during the Las Vegas Summer League and told anyone who would listen about the slender, 6-foot-5 player’s skills and charisma. When Ricky Rubio badly sprained his left ankle earlier this month, the coach gave LaVine some trial by fire as a starter before flipping him back to the bench behind Mo Williams.

For a night, in 26 minutes – Russell Westbrook wasn’t the only guy scoring at greater than a point-per-minute pace Friday – it came together for LaVine. Right place, right time, right audience.

Said Saunders: “I think he showed a little bit of what he’s going to be able to do in this league.”

Hey, 19! Kids all right in Bucks-Wolves

parker

The Bucks’ Jabari Parker is second among rookies in scoring at 11.7. (NBAE via Getty Images)

Basketball fans had a full slate of college hoops games available on their cable and satellite systems Wednesday night. Or, if they preferred their competition a little younger, they had the Milwaukee Bucks facing the Timberwolves at Minnesota (8 p.m. ET on League Pass).

The game at Target Center almost deserved to have beer sales suspended in a nod to the tender years of the youngest Bucks and Wolves. In Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine of Minnesota and Giannis Antetokounmpo and Jabari Parker of Milwaukee, there likely would be four teenagers in the same NBA game for the first time ever. The two Bucks and Wiggins have been starting and, since LaVine has averaged 22.7 minutes in his last seven appearances, the odds were high that all four would be on the court at the same time.

Separately, the two sets of teammates had become the first players under age 20 to start for a franchise since Josh Smith and Marvin Williams did it for the 2005-06 Atlanta Hawks.

The game already had marquee power based on the matchup of No. 1 pick Wiggins and No. 2 pick Parker for the first time in a regular-season game. The two were on parallel tracks last season at Kansas and Duke, respectively, and were considered a coin-flip right through Draft night in June as far as NBA potential. Wiggins, acquired from Cleveland in the Kevin Love trade, leads all rookies with a 12.5 scoring average. Parker is close behind, averaging 11.7 points and 5.9 rebounds to Wiggins’ 3.5.

LaVine was a raw, somewhat surprising lottery pick by the Wolves at No. 13 out of UCLA, and has averaged 5.3 points and 2.3 assists while shooting 33.3 percent in 19.1 minutes. Antetokounmpo was a virtual unknown taken straight from Greece by Milwaukee with the 15th pick in 2013, but he has grown two inches since then and is averaging 11.8 points and 5.5 rebounds while shooting 48.1 percent.

A closer look at the pink shoes the Wolves will wear during Wednesday's game. (Courtesy of Timberwolves)

A closer look at the pink shoes the Wolves will wear during Wednesday’s game. (Courtesy of Timberwolves)

Both franchises seem delighted with their youngsters as the foundation of their rebuilding teams. But as far as the teenaged thing goes, it’s a one-and-done Wednesday; by the time Minnesota plays at Milwaukee on Jan. 9, Antetokounmpo (born Dec. 6, 1994) will already be more than a month into his 20th year.

Another factoid about the Bucks-Wolves game in Minneapolis: Minnesota players will wear pink shoe laces to honor Lula Hall, mother of forward Thad Young who died Nov. 13 after an 18-month bout with breast cancer.

 

“It’s one of those things, I urge all women to get breast exams and make sure you stay healthy,” Young told reporters Wednesday morning.

Rose leaves game with hamstring injury


VIDEO: Rose leaves in second quarter in Denver, doesn’t return

Chicago’s Derrick Rose suffered another injury setback Tuesday night, leaving the game at Denver with what the Bulls said was tightness in the left hamstring.

Rose had just returned to the lineup the night before after missing the previous four games with a hamstring injury. He played 25 minutes in the 97-95 win at Utah and a night later at Pepsi Center was attempting to make it through a back-to-back for the first time since 2013-14.

Instead, Rose played 9 minutes 52 seconds against the Nuggets, all in the first half and did not return for the third quarter. Kirk Hinrich started the second half at point guard.

Rose was trying to come back from a series of knee problems before the hamstring became an issue.

The Bulls next play Friday, at Boston.

Unexpected beasts, leasts suggest surprisingly wide-open East


VIDEO: The NBA TV crews divines the Raptors hot start

Don’t poke at your remote or punch at settings on your touchscreen if you feel a little cross-eyed looking at the Eastern Conference standings. They aren’t what we thought they’d be, to do a 180 on the NFL’s Dennis Green/Bears rant from a few years back.

They aren’t even close, actually, after three full weeks of the 2014-15 regular season.

Most of the respected media outlets didn’t imagine Toronto as the East’s top dog, nor Milwaukee as a playoff team, nor Cleveland as a team that grind along below .500 as Thanksgiving approached.

Few if any expected Orlando to be well in front of New York at this or any other point of the schedule, and Charlotte was a trendy enough pick that some imagined home-court privileges for the Hornets in the first round.

Not many knew what to make of Atlanta, though it generally wasn’t good, but the Hawks weren’t dismissed nearly as readily as Boston was in the “experts’ ” preseason picks. One thing all the geniuses could agree on was Philadelphia’s spot at the shovel end of this circus train, but that had less to do with crystal balls and algorithms than it did with the Sixers’ stated ambition of zero ambitions.

But look where everyone is now.

The East standings are so jumbled, compared to what most expected, that it raises a few questions:

1. Might the door be open for some upstart teams like the Raptors and the Wizards to challenge presumed favorites, the Cavaliers and the Bulls?

2. Will clubs like the Bucks and the Magic have to reassess their goals and factor in playoff possibilities?

3. At what point, if any, do the Knicks borrow from the Sixers and start playing for the bottom in a stink-tank for lottery odds?

4. Who pays all these so-called experts in the first place?

Here’s a look at the predicted order of finish in the East by three heavyweight NBA outlets:

Sports Illustrated: 1) Chicago, 2) Cleveland, 3) Toronto, 4) Washington, 5) Miami, 6) Charlotte, 7) Brooklyn, 8) New York, 9) Indiana, 10) Atlanta, 11) Detroit, 12) Milwaukee, 13) Boston, 14) Orlando and 15) Philadelphia.

BleacherReport.com: 1) Chicago, 2), Cleveland, 3) Toronto, 4) Atlanta, 5) Washington, 6) Charlotte, 7) Miami, 8) Brooklyn, 9) New York, 10) Indiana, 11) Detroit, 12) Milwaukee, 13), Orlando, 14) Boston and 15) Philadelphia.

ESPN.com: 1) Cleveland, 2) Chicago, 3) Toronto, 4) Washington, 5) Charlotte, 6) Atlanta, 7) Miami, 8) Brooklyn, 9) Detroit, 10) New York, 11) Indiana, 12) Milwaukee, 13) Boston, 14) Orlando and 15) Philadelphia.

The real standings, as of Saturday morning, looked quite different from any of the three lists above. There were myriad reasons, from the small sample size of games played and untimely injuries to the friendliness of some clubs’ schedule in opponents or road demands.

Those sorts of things will equalize to some degree as the season plays out. But other factors specific to each team, good or bad, could linger and become part of who they are and where they finish come April.

Here’s a snapshot three weeks in of a conference that didn’t figure to be deep or great when play started but at least looks (euphemism alert!) more interesting now:

1. Toronto (10-2)

Average predicted finish (in ranking cited above): Third

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Attitude. The Raptors played for development long enough. After four years with coach Dwane Casey and 48 victories in 2013-14, the time was ripe to play for something bigger. The roster is deep, the schedule was kind and the Raptors ranked high at both ends (second in ORtg, seventh in DRtg). But the sense of mission hasn’t been greater in years.

2. Washington (8-3)

Averaged predicted finish: Fourth

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Home court. The Wizards had no homecourt edge last season and it cost them when they dropped four of their five playoff games at Verizon Center. This season, they opened 4-0 at home, then followed up a disappointing loss to Dallas with an in-command triumph over Cleveland.

3. Chicago (8-5)

Average predicted finish: First

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Injuries. Even folks who thought Derrick Rose might have to sit some nights while battling soreness in his second comeback from knee surgery didn’t imagine him racking up two sprained ankles and a strained hamstring so soon in this season. Joakim Noah started slow after offseason knee clean-up, and Pau Gasol, Kirk Hinrich and Taj Gibson all have been hurt recently. “Next man up?” More like the setback are starting to catch up.

4. Atlanta (6-5)

Averaged predicted finish: Seventh.

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Passing. The Hawks have been moving the ball great, and that’s essential when you have a balanced offense that can’t – and doesn’t have to – feed just one particular scoring star. Their 64.4% assist percentage is third highest in the NBA. [Note: SI fell prey to trendier picks, put Atlanta 10th and dragged down its predicted finish.]

5. Milwaukee (7-6)

Average predicted finish: 12th

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Defense. The Bucks ranked last in defensive rating in 2013-14, but Jason Kidd and his staff seem to have lit a fire under their overhauled bunch. The Bucks have pretty good depth for a mediocre or worse team, interchangeable parts that can reward Kidd’s search for a hot hand.

6. Miami (6-6)

Average predicted finish: Sixth.

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Dwyane Wade. The Heat are about where folks expected, but they were 5-3 until Wade started missing games. Without LeBron James, they can’t overcome his absences the way they did in the past.

7. Cleveland (5-6)

Average predicted finish: Second

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Unfamiliarity. It’s harder to put together an insta-contender than we thought, perhaps. When Boston did it in 2007-08 and Miami did it (with a few more growing pains) in 2010-11, they had stars in sync – players who knew themselves and each other well enough to fit securely and quickly. The Cavaliers have James in mid-prime but Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love fresh from lottery-team training wheels. And a rookie NBA head coach. Might take months rather than weeks.

8. Orlando (6-8)

Average predicted finish: 14th

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Youth. In this case, the Magic’s heavy lifters might be so young they don’t yet realize what their limitations are supposed to be. Tobias Harris, Evan Fournier and Victor Oladipo have overachieved, even as Aaron Gordon suffered a broken foot and Elfrid Payton took a step back.

 

9. Brooklyn (5-7)

Average predicted finish: Eighth

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Schedule. The Nets weren’t happy but they were 4-2, until heading West for an 0-3 slap. They haven’t recovered, dropping home games against beatable Miami and Milwaukee. With as many vets as Brooklyn has, it should travel better.

10. Indiana (5-7)

Average predicted finish: 10th

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Deep reserves. For all the Pacers’ injuries and setbacks – not just Paul George (leg fracture) and Lance Stephenson‘s departure but having David West, George Hill, C.J. Watson, Rodney Stuckey and C.J. Miles sidelined too – some of the bench players (Solomon Hill, Luis Scola) have stepped up. And late addition A.J. Price stepped in nicely. Keeping things afloat might keep Indiana in a playoff hunt.

11. Boston (4-7)

Average predicted finish: 13th

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Potency. Kelly Olynyk, Jared Sullinger and Avery Bradley have contributed offensively without much fanfare and Boston’s offense (third in FG%, second in assists) has swamped several opposing defenses.

12. Charlotte (4-9)

Average predicted finish: Fifth

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Lance. Though we’re loathe to put too much rise or fall on an individual, there’s no denying everyone had higher hopes for Stephenson in the early season, including himself. The defense isn’t up to Steve Clifford standards either (18th, down from sixth last season).

13. New York (3-10)

Average predicted finish: Ninth

Biggest factor in rise/fall: The triangle. ‘Cuz Adam Silver said so. Also disjointed, sometimes at cross-purposes and lots of pedigree that hasn’t proven anything here yet.

14. Detroit (3-10)

Average predicted finish: 11th

Biggest factor in rise/fall: Scattershooting. Offense has been in scarce supply for the Piston, who rank 28th in offensive rating, 29th in effective field-goal percentage, 29th in true shooting percentage and 27th in assist percentage. The disappearance of center Andre Drummond (from a 22.6 PER last season to 11.5) is vexing as well.

15. Philadelphia (0-12)

Average predicted finish: 15th

Biggest factor in rise/fall: None. The Sixers are right where they wanted to be and right where the basketball world picked them. Congrats, fellas!

‘Rose sits’ is ‘dog bites man’ of news biz

CHICAGO — Derrick Rose is not going to play for the Chicago Bulls vs. the Indiana Pacers Saturday night at United Center.

Rose will miss his fifth game out of the 10 Chicago will have played by night’s end, and the 159th of the Bulls’ 174 regular-season contests since the start of the 2012-13 season.

So here at Hang Time HQ, we have a proposition for the denizens of this blog in keeping with the truest definition of news, which is to say, that which is unusual: How ’bout we throw headlines at you when Rose does play rather than when he does not?

It might be simpler all around if, for the foreseeable future, everyone’s default position is that Rose will be too dinged up in one extremity or another to perform at the level he expects of himself. Or at a level where he can make a difference in the outcome, even if he’s less than 100 percent. Or without the risk of limping in his post-NBA years, by which time we’ll all be watching games and reading blogs from microchips planted in our corneas.

The details of this one, and why Rose will make the Pacers feel a little less injury-sorry for themselves, is that the mild hamstring strain the Bulls point guard suffered late Thursday’s victory at Toronto had not responded completely to treatment. Kirk Hinrich is slated to start in Rose’s spot, while the oft-hobbled and much-scrutinized 2011 MVP remains listed as day-to-day. Sidelined for four previous games by sprains in both ankles, Rose has been limited to cardio work on a treadmill and stationary bike the past two days.

“He needs a little time,” coach Tom Thibodeau told reporters after the team’s morning shootaround. “He said he’s feeling a lot better today, doing more. So we’re just going to work our way through it.”

Love shoots down Lakers talk

Up in smoke?

That’s where Kevin Love is sending any talk of him bailing out on the Cavaliers after one season and heading West to join the Lakers next summer.

The All-Star forward also told Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal that there was no fire to the burning rumor that he and teammate Kyrie Irving were making any illicit hand gestures:

“Whatever we were doing with our hands was about as true as me going to the Lakers,” Love said Friday. “Going to the Lakers, I don’t know where someone got that.

“I don’t know why it was so hard for people to realize we were actually curling our mustache. I guess because I had my fingers in the wrong place. But looking at the tape, film don’t lie. It does look like we’re doing something bad, but that’s not the case.”

‘Big Smooth’ didn’t gripe about 82

Sam Perkins ranks 19th all time in games played (1,286) and 55th in minutes (36,598). The sleepy-eyed, sweet-shooting forward/center known as “Big Smooth” played at least 80 games in nine different seasons and played all 82 three times.

He’s been retired for more than 13 years, finishing with Indiana in 2000-01 after divvying up his 17 seasons between Dallas, the L.A. Lakers, Seattle and the Pacers. At 53, he’s not especially prone to “back in my day” crankiness, but he does wonder why a workload of 82 games seems too much for NBA players and their coaches in recent seasons.

Cleveland’s LeBron James talked last month about the benefits of playing fewer games, if the NBA would ever curtail its schedule. San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich has made it part of his calling card – along with taciturn quarter-break interviews – to rest his veteran stars numerous times during the regular season. But Perkins hasn’t been persuaded.

“Huh. I didn’t really have a problem with 82 games,” Perkins said during a Google+ Hangout with SportsBlog.com. “I thought once you got the format and they rolled it out for you, that’s what you had to do. And on top of that, we had to practice three hours a day, two times for two weeks [in training camp]. So I don’t know how much [more] grueling it is now.”

One gripe with which Perkins does agree: The heavy slate of back-to-back games, which grind on the players and may lead to shabbier basketball on those second nights. Or in the Spurs’ case, multiple absences from the lineup.


VIDEO: Perkins talks to SportsBlog.com

“Back-to-backs take a lot out of you, whether you’re a veteran or a young cat. That will tend to mess with you a little bit with injuries,” Perkins said.

Perkins, a teammate of Michael Jordan‘s at North Carolina who was drafted immediately after him in the 1984 Draft, spends time traveling as an NBA ambassador these days. He went to China with the Brooklyn Nets and spent part of the summer “hanging out” with Team USA at the FIBA World Cup in Spain. Perkins serves on the board of Special Olympics and has been preparing for the Games in L.A. next summer.

Last week he and former NBA player Cedric Ceballos traveled to Johannesburg, South Africa, for the Beyond Sport global summit and awards. One of that organization’s initiatives, Perkins said, was a program in Cambodia to eradicate land mines, making fields safe for kids to play.

But he seemed happy to spend time Friday answering questions via his iPad about his NBA career on a variety of topics:

On his notoriety as an ahead-of-the-curve, perimeter-shooting big man: “I know coaches did acknowledge the reason why they hate me so much is because all their players now try to shoot the three instead of staying inside. … Back then, Coach [George] Karl, Coach [Mike] Dunleavy and all these guys, they wanted to open up the game. So they said, you might need to work on your shot after practice. I didn’t even think about it, but shooting 3s with Byron Scott and all the guards, it just got better. … Guys, when I see them from different teams now, that’s all they know, that I shot 3s.”

On the 1984 U.S. Olympic experience: “It was grueling. Bobby Knight had us down in Indiana … and we went three times a day. I had never seen anything like it. Guys you had heard about finally meeting, and everybody was wondering ‘Who are you? What are you going to do?’ It was our first time meeting if you didn’t play then in college. Charles Barkley, Chuck Person, Antoine Carr, Xavier McDaniel. We just had an all-star crew there. … Bobby Knight was a different coach from Coach [Dean] Smith and what I was accustomed to. You had to pay attention because, as you know, Bobby Knight wasn’t one to play with.”

A player he modeled his game after, growing up in New York: “I saw the Knicks a lot. Willis Reed. Dean Meminger. Walt Frazier. Earl Monroe. These are the guys that I always wanted to be like. Because they played hard, they played together.” Perkins also mentioned ABA legends Artis Gilmore, George Gervin and Connie Hawkins – whom he actually saw play on the playgrounds in Brooklyn – as influences.

The NBA players with the best hair and best nickname: “I would have to say [Anderson] Varejao. No, no, I take that back. Joakim Noah. And favorite nickname? It’s got to be Kobe [Bryant]. ‘Black Mamba.’ “

Favorite teammate: “Chris Mullin, Detlef Schrempf and James Worthy. They were solid.”

His advice to current players about life after basketball: Line up internships in fields that interest them in the offseason. And network. “You definitely have to prepare while you’re playing. They tell you when you come into the league to try to meet as many people as you can – open doors to different avenues. It helped a great deal. And trying to have a positive persona for people to [be attracted to].”

The prospect of NBA franchises in international markets: “The new spot everybody’s thinking about is New Delhi, India. India has the potential of having the NBA there. They have the money, they have the infrastructure. And even though we may not think of India as an NBA country, it is probably one that can sponsor the NBA. It’s fascinating to see the hype for NBA basketball. … The place I would have liked to play would definitely be Spain. It’s a place where I hear a lot of guys go over there, they practice a lot but they don’t play as many games.”

Perkins also participated in a lightning round of word association:

Kobe? “Shooter.”

Knight? “Angry.”

SuperSonics? “Best team I ever played on.”

Michael? “Good teammate.”

Big Smooth? “I think of Byron Scott. He gave me that name.”