Uncategorized

Bogut likely out, but Kerr won’t sit healthy Warriors vs. Spurs


VIDEO: Clash of the titans, tonight on ABC (8:30 ET)

Good thing Golden State coach Steve Kerrheh, heh … was only joking when he talked about … ho, ho … sitting out all his best players from the Warriors’ highly anticipated … ha, ha … game at San Antonio as the latest entry in the NBA’s series of ABC prime-time Saturday night telecasts (8:30 ET).

Otherwise David Stern might have roared back demanding a 10-day contract from NBA commissioner Adam Silver just to mete out Kerr’s and the Warriors’ punishment.

“If I had any guts at all, I’d sit everybody,” Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said after Friday’s win over the Mavericks. “It’s like our sixth game in nine nights. It’s on national TV. If I was [Gregg Popovich], I’d sit everybody, but I don’t have that kind of courage.

“I’m in my second year. I can’t flip the bird to the league, like Pop does every once in a while. That’s my guy, but I’m not in that class.”

As it is, the Warriors expect to play without starting center Andrew Bogut, who suffered a jammed toe in Golden State’s victory at Dallas Friday. The Warriors also have been playing without center Festus Ezeli (knee), swingman Andre Iguodala (ankle) and rookie Kevon Looney (hip).

The two Western Conference powerhouses will play each other three times in the next 23 days. And as Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle notes:

The teams have clinched their respective divisions and appear to be on a collision course to meet in the Western Conference finals as they wrap up two of the NBA’s top three regular seasons ever.

Neither team has dropped consecutive games. Neither team has lost at home.

“This is the matchup that we’ve all been looking for,” Warriors forward Harrison Barnes said. “They’re one of the best defensive teams in the league and one of the teams that we could possibly see in the playoffs. We’re excited. We haven’t won there in a while, so that’s something that’s on our mind.”

“Home dominance is always a hallmark of a great team, but normally that means 35-6,” Kerr said. “The fact that both teams are undefeated is shocking.”

The Warriors haven’t won a regular-season game in San Antonio since Feb. 14, 1997 — a 32-game skid that ranks behind only the Kings’ 43-game road losing streak to the Lakers from 1975-92. The Warriors did win Game 2 of the 2013 Western Conference semifinals in the Alamo City after coughing up Game 1 there.

For a sense of how long ago it was that Golden State won in San Antonio, there’s this graphic, showing the teams’ starting lineups that night:

Butler, Mayo and Cousins in NBA’s ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ matinee


Since it’s Throwback Thursday on social media, we might as well throw it all the way back to that iconic 1966 “spaghetti Western” starring a young Clint Eastwood and directed by Italy’s Sergio Leone that has become a favorite of headline writers and those trading in triplets of all sorts.

In fairly rapid succession Thursday afternoon, the NBA produced news that broke down along the lines of “The Good, the Bad & the Ugly.”

First “the Good:”

This is good news in a macro sense because anytime an All-Star player learns that an injury is less severe than initially feared, fans across the NBA should feel relieved, if not rejoice. It’s good news for the Chicago Bulls at the micro level, though, because any hope that team has of righting itself in time for a serious playoff run in the East bracket requires the services of Jimmy Butler. Here is more detail from Mike McGraw, Bulls beat guy for the suburban Chicago Daily Herald:

Butler, who missed 11 games with a left knee strain, made a successful return last Saturday in a win over Houston, but experienced swelling in the knee after the game. He sat out Monday’s victory over Milwaukee and will not be with the team when the Bulls play tonight at San Antonio. It’s not yet clear whether Butler might play in Friday’s home game against Miami.

Butler has had two MRI exams on his left knee, so structural damage wasn’t the concern when the all-star shooting guard chose to get an opinion from Dr. [James] Andrews. The Bulls have 20 games left to secure a playoff spot. As of Thursday morning, they were in eighth place in the East, a few percentage points ahead of Detroit.

 

Next came “the Bad,” lousy news that even ruthless Lee Van Cleef would Tweet “SMH” over:

The Bucks issues a release quoting general manager John Hammond and stating that Mayo suffered the fracture when he tripped down some stairs at his home. Milwaukee’s backcourt situation already was injury-riddled, with Michael Carter-Williams shut down for hip surgery and Greivis Vasquez sidelined by ankle surgery. Reporter Shams Charnia of Yahoo! Sports’ The Vertical fleshed out Mayo’s predicament:

Mayo, 28, sustained the injury this week and surgery is a possibility, sources said.
Mayo … has averaged 7.8 points, 2.9 assists and 2.6 rebounds in 41 games (24 starts).

He is in the final season of a three-year contract he signed with Milwaukee in 2013.

 

That left – cue the mournful harmonica music of maestro Ennio Morricone – “the Ugly,” provided not surprisingly by the Sacramento Kings and chief migraine-inducer DeMarcus Cousins:

As if Cousins picking up his 15th technical foul of the season wasn’t disruptive enough in Sacramento’s home loss to Cleveland Thursday, the big man appeared to berate head coach George Karl during a timeout in the fourth quarter. Witnesses said Cousins was upset that Karl hadn’t argued foul calls on his behalf.

James Ham, Kings Insider for CSNBayArea.com, offered some context to Cousin’s one-game rip for conduct detrimental to the team:

[Kings GM] Vlade Divac and the Sacramento Kings have put their foot down. … Video was captured of Cousins yelling at the 64-year-old Karl during a timeout.

At one point Rudy Gay and assistant coach Corliss Williamson tried to intervene, and finally point guard Rajon Rondo stepped in between the two as they both sat in a team huddle on the sidelines.

The Kings are mired in a tough stretch over which the team has gone just 1-7 and watch their playoff hopes fade. Tension has been high as the Kings head towards their 10th straight lottery season. Cousins picked up his 15th technical foul during the game for arguing a call and he was in no mood to talk after the game.

This suspension comes on the heels of Karl informing the media late Wednesday that he will miss Thursday’s practice due to a cancer related procedure.

 

Before we leave this film classic, let’s give it the credit it deserves for Eli Wallach‘s character, Tuco, offering a bit of invaluable basketball advice: “When you have to shoot, shoot. Don’t talk.”

 

Blogtable: Looking ahead to Thunder-Warriors on Thursday

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Time to move back 3-point line? | More remarkable: Spurs’ run or Curry’s shooting? | Who needs win more in Warriors vs. Thunder?



VIDEORelive the last Thunder vs. Warriors matchup

> It’s a Thunder-Warriors rematch Thursday night (10:30 ET on TNT). Who’s more in need of a victory here, the Warriors to keep their 73-win season hopes alive? Or the Thunder, to show they can actually beat this Warriors squad?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comOklahoma City needs this way more than Golden State. The Warriors only have to go 19-4 the rest of the way to break the Bulls’ record for best regular season, and you’ll notice that I didn’t put “only” in quotation marks because 54-5 makes 19-4 seem pretty darn breezy. But the Thunder have gotten 130 points from Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook in two games against Golden State — and lost. They limited the Warriors to 7-of-26 on 3-point attempts their first meeting — and lost. They held them to 103 points through four quarters, 12 below average, in the second meeting — and lost, giving up 18 in five minutes of OT. OKC needs some positive reinforcement, fast, to carry with it should the teams meet in the postseason.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comYou don’t ever “need” to break a record. And things do have a way of changing once the playoffs begin. But I think the Thunder would like to show themselves that they can close the deal on the Warriors.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com The Thunder. Golden State can keep its hope for 73 alive even with a loss. It starts to become a mental thing for OKC, though, if the losses in the series pile up. Not that the Thunder should want to see the Dubs in the playoffs either way.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com For so many reasons, the Thunder need this more. Even though they’ve played the Warriors close this season, their confidence mainly is at stake. To be able to crack the mystique of the Warriors, even for one night, might go a long way. As for the Warriors, their remaining schedule, loaded with home games, will still give them a solid chance at 72-plus wins.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com It’s more important to Oklahoma City. The Warriors want 73 wins and that mark would obviously cement their place as one of the best teams in NBA history, but they know who they are, one loss isn’t going to break their stride, and winning a championship is still more important than winning 73 games. With Kevin Durant’s contract situation, this has been a critical season in the Thunder, who need to show their star that they can compete for a championship this year or in the near future. Saturday’s loss at home had to be pretty deflating for OKC, who are clearly on a tier below Golden State and San Antonio. A win over the champs, especially in the building where they’ve won 43 straight regular season games, would be a huge boost of confidence for OKC, and give Durant reason to believe that his team can compete with the champs in a seven-game series.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I think the Thunder need the win more, just to prove to themselves that they can finish the job against the team that has overtaken them as the next big thing in the Western Conference and the league. (Remember, just a few years ago, the Thunder were supposed to be the team of this decade). Win or lose, the Warriors still have 73 in their sights.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: This outcome is going to directly impact the Warriors’ pursuit of the regular-season record. But it will neither enhance nor diminish OKC’s chances in the playoffs. Whatever happens in the postseason is going to be influenced by injuries and the unique dynamic of a seven-game series. So if the 73-win season means something to the Warriors, then that makes this rematch more important to them.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogAt this point, the Warriors have nothing left to prove. They might finish with 73 wins, or 70 wins, or whatever — we are certain that they’re one of the greatest teams in NBA history. I know the Thunder have played the Warriors pretty well in two games this season, narrowly losing both, and I think they could use a W against the Warriors for their own good, so they know that they can not just play them close but have what it takes to knock them off.

Cavs use Sunday as day of rest for LeBron, inciting usual grumbles


“Take rest,” Ovid said. “A field that has rested gives a bountiful crop.” But of course, the ancient Roman poet from the B.C. era hadn’t forked over several pieces of gold to watch the farmer tend to his crops, so what did he care if the guy worked that day or not.

Things are a little different in the NBA, where resting an otherwise healthy player – the way Cleveland Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue did with superstar LeBron James on Sunday afternoon in Washington – is a touchier subject for multiple reasons.

There’s the competitive aspect, in terms of a team voluntarily not using its full roster in taking on that day’s opponent. There’s the fairness angle, since in this example James is a player who usually plays and wreaks havoc on most foes; sitting him down against Washington but not against Detroit, Orlando, Chicago or Charlotte does a favor for the Wizards while cutting no similar slack to the teams bunched around them in the Eastern Conference playoff race.

Then there’s the entertainment factor or, in this case, the caveat emptor factor. Sports franchises market their offerings according to schedules; the more formidable and famous the opponents, generally, the more sought-after tickets to those games become. These days, teams often price their tickets accordingly, charging more for the glamour opponents that feature gawk-worthy stars or suggest the most hotly contested games.

Injury or illness is one thing; sometimes theater-goers get stuck seeing the understudy on Broadway when the star isn’t able to appear. But rest is different, with choice and strategizing typically involved.

When San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich decided to rest four players in November 2012, having them sit out a TNT network game in Miami that fell at the end of a six-game Spurs trip, the NBA reacted swiftly. San Antonio was fined $250,000 by former commissioner David Stern, who called Popovich’s decision “a disservice to the league and our fans.”

Tensions have eased since then, as more coaches have followed Popovich’s lead – OK, not generally for huge TV games in the season’s first month – and even the league HQ has backed off. Commissioner Adam Silver has made schedule-relief a priority in his first two years on the job. Still, it seems a protocol could be provided or suggested, since not all games, opponents and occasions are equal.

When Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Danny Green were held out of that 2012 Heat game, Stern – in announcing the penalty – noted that it was San Antonio’s lone Miami visit that season. While James sat Sunday, he at least had played in D.C. on Jan. 6, scoring 34 points in a Cavs victory. He will face the Wizards again Friday in Cleveland. At least some Washington fans got to see James up close and personal.

The whole home vs. road dynamic seems to have a role here too. Some fans at the Verizon Center might have welcomed James’ “DNP-Rest” because it upped the Wizards’ chances of winning. Others, though, surely wanted to see the four-time MVP perform, preferring basketball artistry and Monday-morning highlights chatter to any potential edge in the group effort.

Wouldn’t it be more fair, for instance, if NBA stars got their rest by sitting out home games? At least then, the fans in the building – while inconvenienced that night – presumably would reap the benefit of the rest, getting a fresher James, Kevin Durant or whomever for a deep playoff run. Home crowds have 41 chances each season to see its teams’ stars. Road crowds get just one or two.

This likely can’t be legislated away, not entirely. Coaches rest players when they need it, we’re told, not just according to the schedule. Road trips tend to be more draining than home stands, so that needs to be accounted for.

Maybe the Board of Governors – not disinterested parties, considering how much each team touts the dates when James, Durant, Steph Curry or Kobe Bryant visits – could mandate that voluntary rest be taken at home only. Or split evenly between home and road. Or maybe the bookkeeping would drive everyone batty.

But it still seemed odd to have James, in the same week he played against the Pistons, the Hornets and the Raptors, sitting idle in warm-ups Sunday, grooming his fingernails or watching Kiss-Cam on the scoreboard same as them. The Wizards didn’t seem to mind, opening up their fat lead and controlling the action on their way to a 113-99 win, but some of their fans surely did.

Pistons void deal with Rockets

Because of a bad back, Donatas Motiejunas will be back in Houston.

Because the 7-foot forward could not get clearance for a back injury that required surgery nearly a year ago, the Pistons voided a three-team trade that included the Rockets and 76ers.

Yahoo Sports was first to report that physicians and specialists who examined Motiejunas on Monday refused to sign off on his health.

As a result, Motiejunas and guard Marcus Thornton will return to Houston and the Pistons will get back the 2016 first-round draft choice that was surrounded in the deal at the trade deadline on Thursday. In addition, Joel Anthony, who was traded from Detroit to the Rockets and then sent on to Philadelphia for the rights to Nigerian forward Chukwudiebere Maduabum, will return to the Pistons.

After undergoing back surgery late last season that forced him to miss the playoffs, Motiejunas had several setbacks in his recovery and has played only 14 games this season. The last NBA game he played was on Dec. 31 against Golden State, when he had to leave after just six minutes due to soreness in his back. Motiejunas was assigned for rehabilitation with the Rio Grande Valley Vipers of the NBA D-League on Jan. 30 and played three games there before the All-Star break. He rejoined the Rockets last week and took part in a practice and declared himself 100 percent healthy.

The 25 year old from Lithuania is slated to become a restricted free agent on July 1. The Rockets had regarded the top 8-protected draft pick they were getting from Detroit as a key building block for the offseason.

Motiejunas averaged 12 points and 5.9 rebounds in 2014-15, but just 5.6 points and 2.1 rebounds this season.

The move comes 22 years after the Rockets voided a trade with the Pistons when forward Sean Elliott could not pass a physical. In that case, Robert Horry and Matt Bullard returned to Houston, where later that season they would become members of the first championship team in Rockets franchise history.

Oscar (Big O) Robertson receives Legends’ Lifetime Achievement Award


VIDEO: Robertson given Lifetime Achievement Award

TORONTO – Oscar Robertson is one of the greatest players in NBA history, a pioneer both on and off the basketball floor and walking shorthand for one of the game’s most esteemed stats: the triple-double.

Current stars way too young to have seen Robertson play during his 14-season career with Cincinnati and Milwaukee know his name and what it meant in terms of 10 or more points, rebounds and assists in the same game.

“He averaged a triple-double, right? The whole season?” Washington’s All-Star guard John Wall said, answering the question with a question. “That’s all I need to know. If you can do that in one season, that means you were a heckuva player.”

How “heckuva” was he? Robertson, 77, will be presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award Sunday at the National Basketball Retired Players Association classy “Legends” Brunch in a ceremony scheduled to feature Lakers Hall of Famer Magic Johnson and the Minnesota Timberwolves young big man Karl-Anthony Towns.

Robertson did average a triple-double in his famous 1961-62 season: 30.8 points, 12.5 rebounds and 11.4 assists. The 6-foot-5 guard from the University of Cincinnati had 41 games that season in which he reached double figures in all three categories – the NBA’s big triple-double threats in 2015-16, Golden State’s Draymond Green and Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook, have done that 10 and eight times, respectively.

Even more impressive, Robertson averaged a cumulative triple-double over his first five seasons as a pro: 30.3 ppg, 10.4 rpg and 10.6 apg across 383 games. He remains the league’s all-time leader with 181 triple-doubles, racking up the 1960 Rookie of the Year award, the MVP in 1964, 12 All-Star berths and three All-Star MVP honors.

After missing the postseason five times and advancing only twice in his 10 years with the Royals, Robertson was traded to Milwaukee to play with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. He and the Bucks won their only championship in his first year there but returned to the Finals again in 1974 before Robertson retired.

If the players who will be participating in Sunday’s All-Star Game weren’t around in time to witness Robertson’s exploits, the same isn’t true for one of their coaches. San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich grew up in Merrilville, Ind., and was a teenager during Robertson’s dominance in Cincinnati. Neither the Pacers nor the Bulls existed yet as a rooting option, making it simple for Popovich to look over to the Royals.

“I’m an Indiana boy. He’s an Indiana guy, from Indianapolis obviously,” Popovich said Friday. “He and [Celtics Hall of Famer] John Havlicek were the two people I keyed in on the most when I was a young kid and watched games. They weren’t on as much as they are now, but whenever they were, those were the guys I wanted to watch.”

In high school, Robertson famously was the leader of Crispus Attucks High’s consecutive state championships, making it the first all-black school in the nation to win a state championship in any sport. At the University of Cincinnati, Robertson’s teams went 89-9; he was the national collegiate player of the year three times and the U.S. Basketball Writers’ player-of-the-year award is now named the Oscar Robertson Trophy.

Before he reached the NBA, he and Lakers legend Jerry West drove the 1960 U.S. Olympic team to a gold medal. And then came his marvelous, multi-faceted work with the Royals.

“I’m still incredulous at Oscar’s accomplishments,” Popovich said, “when you talk about how he scored, passed and rebounded night after night after night. It’s a combination that I don’t think anybody in the league has. Nobody. And he did it over and over again, to the point where it was almost ignored because he made it so common.”

Robertson, who lives in Cincinnati with his wife Yvonne, has said that if he knew triple-doubles were going to be such a big deal, he would have tried to get more of them.

It isn’t possible to fully appreciate Robertson’s impact, though, without noting his work on behalf of the NBA Players Association. He served as NBPA president from 1965 to 1974, becoming the first black president of any sports or entertainment labor union. In 1970, he put his name to a lawsuit to block the merger of the NBA with the old American Basketball Association, to end the option clause binding a player to an NBA team in perpetuity, to end the NBA Draft’s power to bind a player to one team and to end restrictions on free agency.

By April 1976 – 40 years ago this season – the league agreed to a class-action settlement that became casually known as the “Oscar Robertson rule,” eliminating the reserve clause (much like Curt Flood‘s MLB litigation) and moving the NBA toward free agency.

That side of Robertson’s career, he long believed, denied him some post-playing opportunities in coaching, in NBA front offices or in broadcasting because of the clout it shifted to players and the boost it provided to player salaries. It remains an underappreciated element to this day, at least publicly, even as his skills stay relegated to grainy black-and-white film clips.

“I think he probably was the best player to ever play the game,” said Wayne Embry, Robertson’s longtime friend, former teammate and fellow Hall of Famer. “And then the contribution he made with the Oscar Robertson lawsuit., that changed the complexion of the league in salaries and in creating free agency. So all the growth of this league is the result of guys like him getting things right.”

NBPA boosts star power as Knicks’ Anthony elected to union post

TORONTO – Committed in recent years to having the NBA’s biggest names among its union leadership, the National Basketball Players Association furthered that agenda Friday when it elected New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony to Knicks’ All-Star forward, to serve on its executive committee.

Anthony joins fellow All-Stars Chris Paul, the NBPA president, as well as vice presidents LeBron James and Steph Curry as NBA players with the highest profiles, the heftiest contracts and the most at stake in straightening out and strengthening a union that didn’t always command the attention of the league’s elite.

Anthony was voted to a three-year term on the nine-member executive committee, replacing Willie Green, who served three years and is no longer active as an NBA player.

NBPA executive director Michele Roberts has been meeting with NBA commissioner Adam Silver well in advance of what most assume will be a re-opening of the collective bargaining agreement between players and owners in July 2017. Either side has until Dec. 15, 2016, to formally request that the 10-year labor deal signed in 2011-12 end after six years.

Roberts even cited the expected negotiations in a statement announcing Anthony’s executive involvement. “He’s passionate, has the respect of the players and I’m sure he will have a strong point of view during the collective bargaining process,” she said.

Several players were encouraged by the turnout and the tone of the meeting at the boutique hotel in downtown Toronto serving as NBPA headquarters. An estimated 65 members participated, with a number of player reps and rank-and-file members on All-Star break traveling to town specifically to attend.

Not pleased with the terms of the CBA it accepted coming out of the 2011-12 lockout and coping with leadership issues resulting from deposed Billy Hunter’s tenure in Roberts’ role, the NBPA has been aggressive in pulling together a stronger, more professional union. “I wouldn’t even say ‘righting the ship,’ ” one NBA veteran who attended Friday’s session told NBA.com. “It’s more like lifting the ship out of the water, putting it together the way it was supposed to be, and placing it back in.”

Said another player: “It’s all about leadership.”

Curry, Andre Iguodala and James Jones were all re-elected to serve additional three-year terms on the executive committee. The other committee members are Steve Blake, Kyle Korver and Anthony Tolliver.

Kidd-Gilchrist reinjures right shoulder


VIDEO: Michael Kidd-Gilchrist injures shoulder against Pacers

Michael Kidd-Gilchrist of the Hornets dislocated his right shoulder after hitting the floor Wednesday night in Indiana — the same shoulder that cost him the first 46 games of the season.

There was no immediate word how long Kidd-Gilchrist would be out this time.

He had surgery in October to repair a torn labrum and was expected to miss most or all of the season, only to return Jan. 29. In his first six games back, the small forward known for his defense averaged 13.5 points and seven rebounds in 31 minutes a night while shooting 52.6 percent.

 

Ezeli surgery puts to test LeBron’s remark on Warriors’ health

LeBron James didn’t exactly curse the Golden State Warriors earlier this season when he lauded the defending champions as “the most healthy team I’ve ever seen in NBA history.” But that backhanded compliment might no longer apply, based on backup center Festus Ezeli’s surgery Monday.

Ezeli underwent arthroscopic surgery in Oakland to clean out debris from his left knee and will be re-evaluated in six weeks. The team’s official news release included the phrase “expected to return this season,” but that likely means sometime in April, leaving the Warriors only a short time to re-acclimate the 6-foot-11 backup big man before hitting the postseason.

Add in the 16 games forward Harrison Barnes missed with a sprained ankle and it’s becoming increasing difficult to write off Golden State’s success to injury avoidance. Granted this setback still doesn’t match the short-handedness through which James led Cleveland in the playoffs last spring – what with both Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love missing or hobble through most of the playoffs – but it will stretch Golden State’s deep roster just a wee bit thin. Marreese Speights and maybe Jason Thompson will pick up Ezeli’s minutes, while starter Andrew Bogut has less margin for mishap now himself.

Of course, the Warriors could just decide to small-ball the opposition into submission. Ezeli’s impact was most noticeable defensively, with teams shooting worse (46.5 percent vs. 47.1) and scoring less (3.2 points fewer per 100 possessions) when he was on the court.

Monte Poole of CSNBayArea.com caught some of the initial reaction from the Warriors on Ezeli’s situation:

“Festus is a huge part of our rotation,” head coach Steve Kerr said after practice on Monday. “He’s really had a good year, an excellent year.

“Mo is going to step in and play well for us, but I feel bad for Festus. It’s a contract year and he’s young and he’s already had a knee surgery. We’re just keeping our fingers crossed that he’s going to be OK.”

The 6’11” center last appeared in a game on January 25 vs. San Antonio and has missed the last five games due to a sore left knee.

In 40 games this season (11 starts), Ezeli is averaging 7.5 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.23 blocks in 17.8 minutes per contest.

Miami’s Bosh: Long players face long odds in Foot Locker Three-Point Contest


VIDEO: Bosh’s 3-Point highlights

Long thought to be a sport in which height gives one a decided advantage, basketball as put on display at All-Star Weekend tends to come up short, so to speak.

It’s bad enough that centers get thrown into the hopper with the forwards as “frontcourt” players in All-Star balloting. It’s even worse when you look back over past champions of the two most revered side events, the Verizon Slam Dunk and the Foot Locker Three-Point Contest. That’s why Miami’s Chris Bosh isn’t getting his hopes up too much for when he works his way around the arc emptying ball racks on All-Star Saturday Feb. 13.

Only four times since the dunk event became official in 1984 has it been won by a player 6-foot-9 or taller: Larry Nance, 6-foot-10, did it in 1984. Josh Smith, 6-foot-9, won in 2005. Dwight Howard donned his Superman cape in 2008, and Blake Griffin jumped over the Kia in 2011.

The same holds true for big men shooting from long distance, with just four different big men among the winners since the 3-point “shootout” was added in 1986. Larry Bird, at 6-foot-9, won the first three. Peja Stojakoivc, 6-foot-9, won in 2002 and ’03. Dirk Nowitzki claimed the 2006 crown and, six years later, Kevin Love showed off his deep range. Last year, none of the eight contestants stood taller than 6-foot-7.

With the dunk competition, it’s been said for years that it’s harder for a tall player to make his dunks look challenging or artistic enough. There’s no “wow!” factor in how high up the big guys have to get – none of the oohing and aahing Spud Webb or Nate Robinson instantly generated – and generally speaking, wing players in the 6-foot-4 to 6-foot-7 range seem to elevate (so to speak) the act into something balletic.

As for the 3-point contest – which relies on actual scores rather than judging – anatomy and angles seem to disfavor tall guys. Reaching down to grab the ball, then raising it up to proper launch position … that all takes a teensy bit longer for the big guys.

So Bosh is approaching this as something to have fun with, while giving a nod to his fans (current and former) in Toronto, writes Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel:

Selected Thursday to compete, Bosh on Friday reflected on the daunting challenge of shooting against the likes of Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson next week in Toronto.

“Look, I have nothing to lose, OK? I’m just going to shoot it. And if the ball goes in? That’s awesome,” he said.

At 6 feet 11, Bosh is three inches taller than any of the seven other participants.

“I’m just happy I’m the only big,” he said. “Bigs are not going to be a part of the All-Star Weekend in a couple of years. I’m just glad I’m one of the last of the guys.”

With the event at Air Canada Centre, if means more jeers from a fan base yet to accept his free-agency departure from the Toronto Raptors to the Heat in 2010.

“Yeah,” he grinned, “it’ll be awesome. It’s like cheers in reverse. That’s what I tell myself, man. If you care to acknowledge me, that’s half the battle.”

Told it seemingly took Toronto fans 10 years to get over the departure of former Raptors icon Vince Carter, Bosh smiled.

“Oh, so just four more years left?” he said. “OK, that’s good. My kids will be in high school by then. That’ll be nice.”