Skip to main content

HT News

Blogtable: Outlook for D’Angelo Russell in 2016-17?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Gameplan for the Heat? | Future for Lakers’ Russell? |
Lasting memories of NBA summer?


> D’Angelo Russell recently said his rookie season was “bad.” Do you expect a better 2016-17 out of him? And what is one thing you want to see him improve on?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’m just going to say “basketball” and leave it right here. For a guy whose rookie season got defined by shenanigans, even his clever, face-saving sneaker commercial had nothing to do with him helping his team get better. Why do I think he’d be better served by playing in Oklahoma City, Minnesota or Sacramento, as far as limited distractions? Russell can be a better shooter, more efficient passer and lock-down defender, but not until his name appears in John Schuhmann’s numbers-crunchings way more often than on TMZ Sports.

 

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Based on everything I’ve heard, the kid has grown up, from a basketball standpoint. He really wants to be a star. He put in the work over the summer. He knows he let some people down. That’s a good start and refreshing attitude. Leadership is the one area where he needs the most improvement and he has recognized that. Sometimes we forget that these guys are still teenagers on the maturity clock. He and coach Luke Walton are forging a solid relationship and the results of that will be apparent on the court.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: There are a lot of reasons to believe he’ll be better. The summer after your rookie year should be your most productive summer, because you got a taste of the league and know where you have to improve. There will be no deferring to the Kobe Farewell Tour this season and Luke Walton should be a more encouraging coach. Obviously, pick-and-roll decision-making is going to be critical for him, but he also needs to take a big step forward defensively.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Seeing is believing with D’Angelo Russell. He can talk all he wants about what happened during his rookie season, good and bad, but his maturity will be measured by the growth I see in his game and in his understanding of what it takes to be a leader of a team. He showed plenty of flashes on the court. But the leadership component is more important than anything else right now. The Lakers are sure to face some struggles this season and they’ll be searching for an identity as a group under coach Luke Walton. Russell has to step up, he has to lead as the point guard and figure out a way to repair his credibility in the locker room. While I hate heaping that responsibility on a player so young, the Lakers have no choice but to put him on that hot seat this season. The baby steps days are over.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comHe’ll definitely be better. But can Russell be an elite star? That is the bottom line for a franchise that has been defined by A-list talent for decades. The one thing Russell must establish is a starring presence – even though he is not exceptional athletically and he has no dominating teammates. He must create a new era. No other young star will be held to such a high standard. It is asking a lot of someone with so much still to learn.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogStarted from the bottom now we’re here? I think the type of season Russell turns in should tell us a lot about him, and whether he can learn from a bumpy rookie road. Russell had some great showings at the Las Vegas Summer League, but that’s Summer League. I do think he’ll get a boost from the change in coaching staff, and hopefully have more of a chance to play and display what he can do on the court. I also wonder if the presence of Brandon Ingram will serve to take just enough of the spotlight off Russell to allow him to shine.

Blogtable: Gameplan for the Miami Heat?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Gameplan for the Heat? | Future for Lakers’ Russell? | Lasting memories of NBA summer?


> Say you are Heat coach Erik Spoelstra. What is your plan for training camp now that Dwyane Wade is long gone and Chris Bosh’s status is, at best, up in the air?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comMake sure I try out every one of those 18 water slides at the Atlantis Bahamas resort where the Heat will hold training camp? OK, besides that, my plan would focus on sorting through the multiple options in the backcourt, helping Justise Winslow develop a more reliable and rangier jump shot and watching a now-paid Hassan Whiteside very closely for any signs of slippage or distraction. I also might want to turn whatever Plan B is into Plan A, as far as Chris Bosh is concerned. Two consecutive seasons got sideways due to his blood-clots health scares, and Miami needs that resolved one way or the other. It’s a much bigger on-court cloud than Dwyane Wade‘s departure, where the roster at least offers alternatives. Not so much with Bosh.

 

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The first thing is to let go of yesterday. LeBron James and Wade aren’t walking through that door and maybe not Bosh either. Embrace change and begin to emphasize a new philosophy with a new core. The emphasis should be on developing Hassan Whiteside into a star, pump some air in Goran Dragic‘s confidence and stress defense. It’s a new era in Miami and there’s no sense ignoring it.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comPlay fast. Dwyane Wade is a Hall of Famer, but the pace he played at didn’t allow Goran Dragic to be his best with the Heat. Dragic wants to run and he’ll be able to do it more often playing more minutes alongside younger guys like Justise Winslow and Tyler Johnson (and Josh Richardson when he returns from his knee injury). Hopefully, Hassan Whiteside can stay engaged (and more disciplined) for longer stretches than he was last season and can, along with Winslow, keep the Heat in the top 10 defensively. More stops will create more chances to run. The Heat have ranked in the bottom eight in pace each of the last four seasons and it’s time for that to change.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: If I am Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, the one thing I know I’m not going to do is bring up the names Dwyane Wade or LeBron James. No sense in torturing myself as a coach knowing those guys are playing elsewhere. And I have to plan to go to work in training camp without Chris Bosh. Until he is cleared for full activity, I have to plan accordingly. It’s all about the youth movement now. Hassan Whiteside, Justise Winslow, Tyler Johnson and Josh Richardson have to continue to develop. As a staff, we have to make sure Goran Dragic and Udonis Haslem lead the way for us and show everyone else what it is we expect from this team from a culture standpoint. We are starting from the ground up, rebuilding this program, so I know I’ve got perhaps the greatest challenge of my career ahead of me.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comBosh is on the books for the next three seasons with a salary that eats up roughly one-fourth of Miami’s cap. If Bosh can play in most of the games at his typical All-Star level then they could be competing for the No. 2 seed in the East. But Spoelstra will have no control over that. Whether or not Bosh can contribute, the Heat are going to have to develop a go-to scorer on the perimeter. Every contender needs one, and Spoeltra must find one – which creates a huge opportunity for Goran Dragic.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Sometimes desperation begets inspiration. Last year during the playoffs against the Toronto Raptors, after Hassan Whiteside went down, the Heat ended up trotting out a lineup featuring Justise Winslow at center, surrounded by a bunch of guards and small forwards. And they were fun to watch! They may not have had enough to beat the Raptors, but it was an interesting lineup with room to grow. So this year I’m guessing they return with Whiteside and then spread the floor with shooters and athletes. Obviously a lot is dependent on the health and return of Chris Bosh, but I’m not writing the Heat off just yet.

Morning shootaround — Sept. 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Shaq: Simmons a ‘LeBron-type player’ | Payne on mend for Thunder | Schroder embraces bigger role on Hawks

No. 1: Shaq calls Simmons a ‘LeBron-type player’ — As a Hall of Fame player and today as a TNT analyst, Shaquille O’Neal is never one to shy away from a bold proclamation. He’s also got a lot of pride in his alma mater, LSU, and will talk up a player from there from time to time. O’Neal tapped both of those wells as he gave his thoughts on the No. 1 pick in the 2016 draft, Philadelphia 76ers forward Ben Simmons, during an interview at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, writes Jessica Camerato of CSNPhilly.com:

Shaquille O’Neal was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as one of the best to have ever played the game. He has solidified his place in basketball history, and now he is eyeing the next generation of potential stars in the incoming rookie class.

“I don’t know all of them, but I know my guy’s going to be pretty good, Ben Simmons,” O’Neal said last week in Springfield, Mass.

O’Neal said he has paid attention to only the top two picks, Simmons and Brandon Ingram. He got to know Simmons’ game before he was drafted by the Sixers when Simmons attended his alma mater, LSU.

O’Neal recognized Simmons’ multidimensional skillset, from scoring to ball handling to rebounding, which sets him apart as a 6-foot-10 point-forward. Even though Simmons played just one season in college, that was enough time for O’Neal to draw comparisons between him and one of the most talented in the NBA.

“He’s a LeBron-type player,” O’Neal said. “What I mean by that, LeBron does a nice job of making everybody else around him better — passing the ball, doing the small things — and Ben is that type of player.”

O’Neal defended Simmons’ collegiate performance and expects improvements from the 20-year-old in the NBA.

“He took a lot of flack, especially at LSU with not really taking over games,” O’Neal said. “But he’s young. He’ll get to that.”

Simmons will be a centerpiece of the Sixers system this season. He brings intangibles, versatility and a basketball IQ that is already beyond his years.

“When it comes to other aspects of the game, he’s very, very intelligent,” O’Neal said. “He plays the game very well.”

***

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Sept. 12

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Optimism growing about Bosh’s status | Report: Howard falls ill on flight | Hill ready to lead Jazz back to playoffs

No. 1: Report: Optimism growing that Bosh will play in 2016-17 — The Miami Heat and star forward Chris Bosh seem to have the same goal in mind — him playing in the 2016-17 season. However, enacting a plan both sides agree on to reach that goal hasn’t always gone well. Bosh missed the last half of the 2015-16 season with a heart condition and still needs clearance from the team to play again. According to Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald, Bosh and the Heat may be getting close to that approval status:

There is growing optimism about Chris Bosh being cleared by the Heat to resume his career while remaining on blood thinners, according to a union source.

Bosh pitched the Heat on playing late last season, while taking a new form of blood thinner that would be out of his system in eight hours or so. The Heat resisted that approach at that time but is now more open than it had been to Bosh playing while on blood thinners, according to the source.

Bosh wouldn’t be the first athlete to do that: Former Florida Panthers player Tomas Fleischmann takes anticoagulant injections after games that are out of his system by game time.

Whether Bosh would be able to play in every game, such as the second set of back-to-backs, remains to be seen.

But barring a setback in the next few weeks, it would be surprising if Bosh isn’t cleared to play.

That would mean a Heat starting lineup of Bosh, Hassan Whiteside, Justise Winslow, Goran Dragic and likely Dion Waiters.

***

(more…)

Report: Heat guard Richardson sustains knee injury

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Miami Heat guard Josh Richardson is out indefinitely after tearing the medial collateral ligament in his right knee during a workout with teammates earlier today, as first reported by The Vertical.

It’s a tough blow for a Heat team that was counting on Richardson to contribute even more than he did during a somewhat surprising rookie campaign for a team that made the Eastern Conference semifinals last season.

Richardson, the Eastern Conference Rookie of the Month in March, could be back in time for the start of the season. But the Heat won’t know for sure until the severity of his injury is determined.

Richardson averaged 6.6 points and 1.4 assists in 52 games last season and shot 46.1 percent from beyond the 3-point line in 52 games. With All-Star shooting guard Dwyane Wade gone to Chicago in free agency, Richardson is expected to battle for playing time with Dion Waiters, Wayne Ellington, Tyler Johnson and Been Udrih in a revamped Heat backcourt alongside starting point guard Goran Dragic.

 

Report: Pelicans add Stephenson to roster

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Lance Stephenson‘s free agent summer ended a little later than expected.

But he’ll back in the Western Conference for the start of the 2016-17 NBA season after agreeing to sign a deal with the New Orleans Pelicans earlier today, as first reported by Shams Charania of The Vertical and since confirmed by multiple outlets.

Stephenson, who finished last season with the Memphis Grizzlies, will reportedly have to earn a roster spot. The Pelicans already have 15 players on their roster with guaranteed contracts, and three others (Chris Copeland, Robert Sacre and Shawn Dawson) with partially guaranteed deals.

Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry has a roster loaded with backcourt players, including rookie shooting guard Buddy Hield as well as veterans Tyreke Evans (returning from injury), Norris Cole, E’Twaun Moore and Langston Galloway. But they’ll begin the season without point guard Jrue Holiday, who is taking a leave of absence to care for and support his pregnant wife Lauren as she also deals with a brain tumor.

With Anthony Davis returning from injury, Gentry needs to surround his franchise big man with quality depth. Stephenson will have to scrap to be a part of that group.

He’s shown that ability in the past, particularly during his time with the Indiana Pacers earlier in his career and for the Grizzlies in the playoffs last season, when he averaged 13 points. And at 25, Stephenson is in physical prime. In six NBA seasons Stephenson has averaged 8.8 points, 4.2 rebounds and three assists. He spent his four seasons with the Pacers, one with the Charlotte Hornets and last season with the Los Angeles Clippers and Grizzlies.

Morning shootaround — Sept. 9

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Davis cleared for start of season | Kerr expecting ‘growing pains’ on defense | Reinsdorf discusses Bulls’ offseason overhaul

No. 1: Pelicans’ Davis medically cleared for start of season — The New Orleans Pelicans haven’t seen their do-everything superstar, Anthony Davis, on the court for them since late March. That’s when Davis was shut down for the season with a torn labrum in his left shoulder and tendinosis in his left knee. But things are looking up for the Pelicans and Davis, as he recently took part in the team’s offseason workout in Los Angeles and has now been medically cleared for the start of 2016-17. John Reid of The Times-Picayune has more:

Anthony Davis is expected to be medically cleared to start the season with no restrictions, New Orleans Pelicans general manager Dell Demps said at a season-ticket event for fans at the team’s practice facility on Wednesday night.

Davis underwent a surgical procedure in March to fix a tendinopathy and a stress reaction problem in his left knee cap. Davis also suffered a torn labrum last season, but he did not require surgery on his left shoulder.

Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry said on the Pelicans’ in-house podcast show last week that Davis is still a little banged up but he’ll be able to play pickup games and do everything in training camp and then will be ready at 100 percent when the Pelicans open the regular season on Oct. 26 against the Denver Nuggets at the Smoothie King Center.

Davis spent nearly the entire offseason in Los Angeles going through rehab work to prepare for the season. He also participated in volunteer workouts with his teammates in Los Angeles.

Demps also told fans that small forward Quincy Pondexter participated in his first ‘full go’ workout on Wednesday and they are excited to get him back in the fold with training camp opening on Sept. 24.

‘I think with Quincy he’s getting close and I think we’re airing on the side of caution and not jumping the gun at all,” Gentry said on the Pelicans’ in-house podcast.”I think he will probably be healthy and ready to go for us.”

Guard-forward Tyreke Evans will not be available for the start of the upcoming season because he is not fully recovered after undergoing three surgeries on his right knee in a nine-month span. The Pelicans say Evans is still rehabbing to strengthen his surgically repaired knee.

***

(more…)

Timberwolves still awaiting word on Kevin Garnett’s plans for 2016-17

With training camp less than three weeks away and their first preseason game set for Oct. 8, the Minnesota Timberwolves still are waiting to hear from veteran forward Kevin Garnett on his decision to play in 2016-17 or to retire.

“Kevin hasn’t told me or informed me yet if he’s coming back to play or if he isn’t coming back,” Wolves owner Glen Taylor told NBA.com Thursday. “I can only assume I’ll be hearing from him in the next three weeks.”

Garnett, whose contact not just with media but also Wolves management is limited in the offseason, is under contract for $8 million to play this season. From that standpoint, no news is good news — or at least status quo. If Garnett does play, it would be his 22nd NBA season.

Garnett — the only player in NBA history with at least 25,000 points, 10,000 rebounds, 5,000 assists, 1,500 steals and 1,500 blocks — played in only 38 games last season due to chronic knee pain, averaging 3.2 points, 3.9 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 14.6 minutes. His career numbers: 17.8 ppg, 10.0 rpg, 3.7 apg and 34.5 mpg.

Tom Thibodeau, the Wolves’ new coach and president of basketball operations, told NBA.com Wednesday at the coaches meetings in Chicago that discussions on Garnett’s status still are between Taylor and the player.

Morning shootaround — Sept. 8

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Riley: ‘We move on’ from Wade | How Magic nearly flubbed drafting Shaq in ’92 | Towns on Wolves: ‘We’ve got to make the playoffs’

No. 1: Riley has ‘no regrets’ as 2016-17 season nears — The Miami Heat have retooled their roster this summer and as part of it, watched as franchise icon Dwyane Wade left in free agency to sign with the Chicago Bulls. Team president Pat Riley knows a new era is afoot in Miami and acknowledged as much in an interview with the Palm Beach Post‘s Tom D’Anglelo:

Heat president Pat Riley is looking forward to Sept. 27, the start of yet another era in his 22 years with the Heat. While the expectations have been lowered, that does not mean Riley and the organization will approach this year any differently.

“No apologies, no regrets – except for one – no tears,” Riley told me today, obviously referring to losing franchise icon Dwyane Wade to the Chicago Bulls. “Good luck. We move on. Players come and go, but franchises move on.”

The reason for our conversation was to speak about Shaquille O’Neal’s induction into the basketball Hall of Fame on Friday. Riley took the time to speak from San Tropez where he and Heat owner Micky Arison are on a five-day journey through the Mediterranean to celebrate the 25th wedding anniversary of Magic and Cookie Johnson. (More in this below)

Riley, 71, does not sound like a man ready to cruise into retirement. He clearly is looking at ways to rebuild this team into one that can one day compete for the organization’s fourth title.

The Heat have been remade since losing Wade, Luol Deng and Joe Johnson among others. They are a mix of young athletic players with fewer veterans than Heat teams of recent years.

“I’m excited for our new guys,” he said before already talking about the next move. “Maybe we make a deal or catch lightening in a bottle again next summer (in free agency) like we did in 2010.”

***

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Sept. 7

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Rivers says Pierce still unsure about playing | Mitchell sounds off about dismissal | Gordon, Magic expecting playoffs in 2016-17

No. 1: Rivers says Pierce still unsure about 2016-17 — The last news we heard about Paul Pierce was that the 38-year-old former Finals MVP was leaning toward returning to the LA Clippers for what would be his 19th overall NBA campaign. Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who was speaking at a fundraiser for the ABCD Camp in Boston, told reporters he remains unsure if Pierce will play for LA next season. ESPN.com’s Chris Forsberg has more:

“Depends on the day I talk to him. Paul has had the summer, he’s gone back and forth,” Rivers said while back in Boston to host the annual ABCD Hoops Dream fundraiser at TD Garden. “I think he has a right to do that. I really do.

“Paul didn’t have the best year last year. I don’t think he wants to go out that way. So I think that’s why he’s working to try to come back. But he still may change his mind next week. So we just have to wait. I told him if I see him at training camp, I’m assuming he’s playing.”

Rivers plans to talk with Pierce again this week but does not expect an answer until training camp draws closer.

Rivers said he would be brutally honest with Pierce if he didn’t think Pierce was capable of helping the Clippers next season.

“If I don’t think they can play, then I tell them that. But I think Paul can play,” Rivers said. “I don’t know how much he’ll play, but he can play. I’ve always thought it’s easy for someone else to tell you to retire; I think that’s something that the player has to come to by himself.”

Rivers reaffirmed that, should Pierce choose to retire, he’ll encourage him to sign a one-day contract with the Boston Celtics in order to retire as a member of the Celtics organization.

“I think it’s important. I think we have to do that. And I think we will,” Rivers said. “[Celtics president of basketball operations] Danny [Ainge] and [assistant general manager] Mike [Zarren], we’ve already talked.

“The day [Pierce] retires, he’s going to retire a Celtic. He has to. Paul’s a Celtic. So when he retires, he’s got to retire as a Celtic. I don’t think anyone disagrees with me.”

Rivers talked with Ray Allen this summer but wouldn’t tip his hand on whether he thought Allen would resume his NBA career after sitting out the past two seasons.

“I don’t know. I won’t talk about what we talked about. I think if Ray was in the right spot, he may play,” said Rivers. “I think Ray wants to golf a lot too, right now. But Ray is in amazing shape. I don’t know how he does that. I didn’t know how he does that as a player; I don’t know how he does it as a non-player. He’s probably in top-5 shape in the NBA. So could Ray play? Absolutely, I believe he could.”

Rivers sounded most confident that Kevin Garnett would continue his playing career, even as he aids the rebuilding process with the Minnesota Timberwolves.

“I think Kevin — and I know it, because I talk to him — loves the young guys on his team,” Rivers said. “He loves how they work. He thinks they have an old-school mentality. So I think he’s really gotten into Kevin, the teacher. And I honestly never saw that coming, either. Yet he was a phenomenal teacher with [Boston]; I just didn’t think he would have the patience to do it. And I think Kevin loves teaching these young guys.

“And I think Paul just loves playing. He was the one that I thought would play the longest because the way he plays, and he’s doing it.”

***

(more…)


Advertisement