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Blogtable: Worried about Hawks?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Remembering Nash’s career | Next moves for Thunder? | Worried about Hawks?



VIDEOHow the Spurs diced up the Hawks in Atlanta

> The Hawks have lost three in a row for the first time all season. Is this team simply in neutral, coasting to the finish line, or have the Hawks run out of gas?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Some of the Hawks’ remarkable achievements have caught up with them, in terms of trying to maintain such excellence so long (think Indiana last season), and some of what befalls any NBA team has been in play too. As in injuries to Kyle Korver and Mike Scott. Once a lot of us in the media started saying, “Yeah, we’re convinced now that Atlanta is good. But let’s see what happens in the postseason…,” it seemed only fair that the Hawks might embrace a little of that attitude, too.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI’ll go with neither. The Hawks are hardly coasting and I don’t believe they’ve hit the wall. It’s a long, long season and virtually every team goes through some kind of funk. But I’m thinking that by the time the playoffs start in three weeks, the Hawks will have rediscovered their Uptown Funk and gon’ give it to you.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comFirst of all, the losses were to the Warriors and Spurs (plus also the Thunder with Russell Westbrook getting a triple-double). Secondly, it’s was three games. So, no. I’m not seeing running out of gas yet. I’m not seeing coasting either. If this continues for a couple weeks, if the Hawks start falling over face first against Orlando, Charlotte and Detroit within the next five games, then we’ll have something to talk about. Right now, it’s nothing beyond the same tough stretch every team navigates.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comLook, the Hawks simply couldn’t play any better than they did from December through February. Eventually, a slide was coming; the only question was how much? It’s tough to place a sense or urgency on their latest performance only because we’re in the dog days. I trust Al Horford will snap out of it as well as the Hawks once the games take on a greatest sense of importance. That said: Cleveland and LeBron are the favorites coming out of the East, and I thought that way even at the height of Hawksmania.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThey lost to the Warriors, Thunder and Spurs, and they were missing Kyle Korver in the first two games. Questions about how well their defense (which has been really bad in the three games) will hold up in the playoffs are legit, but it’s not time to panic just yet.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com They are certainly not out of gas. And you don’t win 55 games with a month left in the season coasting or stuck in neutral. The Hawks simply ran into that tough stretch of the season where you get exposed a bit. It’s nothing that cannot be cured with some intensive film study, a little introspection and the return to health of several key players who have dealt with injury concerns since the All-Star break. Beyond that, there is nothing to see here folks … until the playoffs get underway.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThere is no shame in losing at Golden State and OKC or at home to the Spurs. And there was no way for the Hawks to maintain their high level of efficiency all season long — as the Warriors have also discovered recently. This little dip should have no bearing on the playoffs, when the Hawks’ success will be defined by the matchups.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Oh, so here it comes. All Atlanta fans knew this was in the cards, because no matter how great things are going, this is how it always ends for Atlanta sports teams — in disaster and sadness and disappointment and despair. Except maybe not this time? Because even though the Hawks have lost three in a row, I’m not ready to count them out just yet. They’ve been without Kyle Korver, Mike Scott and Thabo Sefolosha, three of their best eight players. If anything, their absence has highlighted how important having a full complement of players is for this team. It’s not any one guy, it’s not the four All-Stars, the Atlanta Hawks are a team where guys one through 15 each matter.

Blogtable: Next moves for Durant, Thunder?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Remembering Nash’s career | Next moves for Thunder? | Worried about Hawks?



VIDEOIs a playoff push a wise idea for OKC?

> The Thunder have removed Kevin Durant from basketball-related activities and say he is out indefinitely, still bothered by the injury to his right foot. What does this latest setback mean for Durant? For the Thunder?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I think Durant’s extended absence means OKC is not a top threat to emerge from the killer Western Conference this spring, if it makes the postseason at all. That team has shifted and adapted too much – to injuries and to Russell Westbrook-palooza – to reconfigure itself on the fly for an extended playoff run. It also means everything will be on the line in 2015-16 for the Thunder as that franchise takes its last big shot at a championship before Durant hits free agency.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: It means that Durant should temper thoughts of macho heroics and take the longer view of his career. If he can return for the playoffs without doing further damage, fine. But if it’s a risk, starting planning for training camp in October. That goes squared for Thunder management. Heading into the last year of his contract next season, it’s all about the personal connection between Durant and the franchise and GM Sam Presti knows that.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: That it’s probably time to think about next season. We won’t know for sure until the medical bulletins just before the playoffs, but if the Thunder can’t even set a timetable when he will be back, the latest problem is a significant setback. Get him in a good place for the start of 2015-16. One-hundred percent, with no uncertainty. As much as Russell Westbrook is playing in another stratosphere right now, chances are slim that OKC could make a long run with Durant having little or no prep time before the postseason, along with the other injury concerns. If there is any doubt about the ability of the first to hold up through a series or two this spring, focus on the big picture.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I always thought this was a lost year for OKC anyway, based only on karma. Something always seemed to go wrong for OKC and, specifically, Westbrook and Durant, in terms of health. Even if Durant hadn’t suffered this latest setback, the Thunder would’ve faced a tough first-round matchup with the Warriors. In the short term, his injury hurts, obviously. In the long-term, unless the injury is chronic, I can’t see why OKC can’t return to normal right away.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Both parties need to prioritize the future over this season, which will, at best, finish in a first round defeat at the hands of the best team (statistically) since the 1995-96 Bulls. And that means that they need to have a conversation about Durant’s future. He’s got one more year on his contract, and if he has plans to leave, his team needs to know about them now.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: It means Durant should begin his offseason program now rather than weeks from now if and when the Thunder are eliminated from the playoffs. Now is not the time for Durant to take foolish risks with his body, not after all of the peculiar injury issues that have gone on around the league this season. For the Thunder it means you trudge on for the remainder of this season with Mr. Triple-Double himself, Russell Westbrook, creating chaos for the opposition. Any dreams of an upset in the playoffs seem to be just that, dreaming.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comIf healthy and whole, I’d been thinking they could win the championship from the No. 8 seed. What Durant’s continuing absence means is more speculation than ever about his free agency in 2016, most of it premature and unfounded. The reality is that OKC still has Russell Westbrook, who is going to be focused on the here-and-now of trying to upset Golden State – and who’s to say that he can’t, with nothing to lose and the Warriors carrying so much pressure as the heavy favorite?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: For Durant, it means he needs to sit down and get healthy before he even starts thinking about returning. Durant is crucial to the Thunder’s attack, but that means not just this season, but for as long as Durant is wearing a Thunder uniform. For the Thunder, I just hope they resist any urge to hurry Durant back. I know the summer of 2016 looms large on the horizon, but to me, the best sales pitch to get Durant to re-sign is to put together a championship team. And there is no way that winning a title in Oklahoma City doesn’t involve a healthy Kevin Durant.

Blogtable: Remembering Nash’s career

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Remembering Nash’s career | Next moves for Thunder? | Worried about Hawks?



VIDEO: How did Steve Nash affect the modern NBA game?

> He was the master of the pick-and-roll, the NBA’s assists leader five times in seven years, a two-time MVP, an eight-time All-Star, a 90 percent free-throw shooter … What will you remember most about Steve Nash’s career?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I’ll remember Nash as the Wayne Gretzky of the NBA. Not in terms of total dominance or mountainous statistics but in terms of his wizardry with the ball. Most notably, the way he would dribble down to the baseline, beneath the basket — like Gretzky working from behind the net — and out to find something even better than he might have initially conceived. It was the sense that Nash played chess while other NBA players were mastering checkers. The fact that Nash also is Canadian was just a coincidence for me.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: That for all the fancy passing and graceful floating shots, he was tougher than year-old beef jerky. I’ll always remember Game 1 of the 2007 playoff series against the Spurs when Nash’s bloody, raw, cut-open nose looked like it had gone 12 rounds with Mike Tyson and he stayed in the game to put up 31 points and eight rebounds.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: That he was a textbook. Want to see how a point guard is supposed to look on offense? Watch Steve Nash. He could play fast, he could play halfcourt. He could shoot, he could pass. He was always a good leader by example, dedicated to getting better and keeping his body in a good place, until Father Time finally ran him down, and later in his career seemed to assert himself more as a vocal leader in the locker room. Nash was not at the same level as the likes of John Stockton and Gary Payton among point guards from around the same era because they defended as well, but he should be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I’ll remember Nash for triggering the most entertaining style of basketball since the Showtime Lakers. The Suns were pure joy, must-watch TV, and rarely delivered a dud. It was mainly because of Nash and his ability to thrive in the open court and spot teammates and pull up for jumpers. The only point guard to come close since then is Steph Curry. I guess I should remember the two MVPs but those were somewhat controversial. Anyway, Nash was a personal favorite and as a bonus, a total class act.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: That Nash teams led the league in offensive efficiency for nine straight seasons, with him shooting 49.7 percent from the field, 43.9 percent from 3-point range and 91.0 percent from the line, tells me that he’s one of the greatest offensive players in NBA history. That streak includes a season when Amar’e Stoudemire played three games and another season-plus when Shaquille O’Neal supposedely bogged down the offense. Along with Suns coach Mike D’Antoni, Nash changed the way the game is played. And with his shooting, vision, creativity and unselfishness, he’s the prototype for the modern-day, pick-and-roll point guard.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Nash helped revolutionize the game as we see it now, ushering in the up-tempo style that has morphed into the pace-and-space game that has become the rage in the NBA. He did it by being a traditional point guard in the truest sense of the words, excelling as a facilitator with flair the likes of which we hadn’t seen since Magic Johnson. And, Nash was a shooter extraordinaire at the same time. My appreciation for his game increases as time passes and we continue to see point guard play evolve into the mold Nash helped create for the modern point guard. The fact that he’s one of the genuinely great guys in the history of sports certainly makes it easier to appreciate him even more in hindsight. The telltale for me is when you ask those who have worked in the same uniform with him over the years who is their favorite teammate of all time? Nash wins unanimously.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: He brought flair to the game. In an era when the NBA was being overrun by young dunkers who didn’t know how to play for the sake of the team, Nash elevated his teams by way of his skills, creativity and cleverness. He was the thinking man’s star, and he influenced the generation of Chris Paul, Stephen Curry, Rajon Rondo and others as the NBA became a point-guard league.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Actually, the thing I will recall the most is none of that stuff. Back in 2001, I spent a summer day with Nash in Toronto while working on a profile for SLAM magazine. He had a few media appearances to make, so we walked around the city, talking about everything from basketball to soccer to politics to music. He got recognized a few times, but for the most part people left us alone. A few years later, after Nash had bounced from Dallas to Phoenix and redefined the point guard position, we met up in Toronto again. By now, Nash was one of the best players in the NBA and a Canadian icon. The low profile may have been out the window, but Nash was the same regular guy, an unassuming kid from Western Canada who through hard work and will made himself into one of the greatest players in basketball history.

Morning shootaround — March 25


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played March 24

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron has no issue with Love’s MVP vote | Golden State wraps up Pacific | McHale expecting worst with Beverley’s injury; Howard may return tonight

No. 1: James not faulting Love for his MVP choice – Cleveland Cavaliers power forward Kevin Love has been in the spotlight a little bit after some recent interviews. He recently told ESPN Radio’s “Mike and Mike” how his relationship with Cavs star LeBron James is ‘evolving’ and, in a chat with “The Dan Patrick Show”, Love said that if he had an MVP vote, it would likely go to Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook (and not his teammate, James). So is James miffed over who Love would pick if he could vote? Not in the slightest, writes Dave McMenamin of ESPN.com:

“I don’t really think too much of it, really,” James said after Cleveland Cavaliers practice on Tuesday. “I don’t really get involved in that. I think the voters are going to decide who is the MVP. I think what Russ has been doing, his numbers have been pretty crazy keeping those guys afloat in the West in his play. Steph Curry can make a case, for sure, what he’s been doing — James Harden and myself, as well. So, Kevin has his own opinion of who he believes is the MVP. No one should fault him for that.”

Love was a guest on “The Dan Patrick Show” on Monday and was put on the spot to pick either Oklahoma City’s do-everything guard or Cleveland’s captain for the NBA’s most prestigious individual award.

“I would just say because of time spent on the court, you know ‘Bron took those few games off and those couple of weeks off. … They’re both having MVP-type seasons, but I’m going to go with Russell Westbrook because every single night you’re looking at his stat sheet, they’re fighting for a playoff spot even with Serge Ibaka going down now, Kevin Durant potentially being out the rest of the year and [Westbrook] still going out there and really fighting for his team and them winning and fighting for that seventh and eighth spot in the playoffs,” Love told Patrick. “I think Russ is arguably having the better season.”

Love expanded on his choice on Tuesday when asked if he was surprised all the attention his answer caused.

“If you choose to get the little three or four second clip,” Love said, believing his answer was controversial only when taken out of context. “In my whole answer I said LeBron could very well be the MVP. Steph Curry, James Harden — those are guys that you all talk about. You know very well all of them could be named (MVP).”

James said he doesn’t judge this season for him based on his previous MVP campaigns, but rather on his impact he’s made in the games he’s played.

“When I’m on the floor, you judge me by when I’m on the floor and my winning and do I win?” James said. “And when I’m on the floor, do I play at a high level? And that’s all I care about. When I’m on the floor, is my team winning? Because I think that has a lot to do with it. And, how are my numbers when I’m on the floor? Judge me by that and then when I’m not on the floor.”


VIDEO: LeBron James talks after practice about Kevin Love’s MVP comments

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Saunders flips over ‘tanking’ accusation from Jazz broadcasters


VIDEO: Wolves defeat Jazz with limited roster

“Tanking” has become a buzzword in the NBA, and a regrettable one at that. It’s a too-widely embraced, wink-wink term for teams that sorta-kinda allegedly do as much as they can to lose games – or as little as they can to win them – without stepping over a line of integrity that would drop the league to the level of professional wrestling.

The franchise most commonly associated with the accusation, the Philadelphia 76ers, has had two years to get callous to the charge. And lately “resting,” tanking’s cousin, has taken over as the ethical issue du jour deep into the 2014-15 season, pushing lottery-obsessed shenanigans out of the spotlight for now.

But Flip Saunders is old school and he didn’t like it when what he felt was a gutty, gritty, resourceful performance from his Minnesota Timberwolves was met – even as it happened by Utah Jazz broadcasters Craig Bolerjack and Matt Harpring – with derision. Bolerjack and Harping portrayed the Wolves’ limited roster (seven players!) Monday in Salt Lake City as yet another tanking production by one of the league’s bottom feeders.

The Wolves are in obvious rebuilding mode, force-feeding presumptive Rookie of the Year Andrew Wiggins heavy minutes while scouting heavily for the Draft in June. At 15-54 when their skeleton crew took the floor at Energy Solutions Arena, they trailed only New York (14-57) in the spiral down to the most lottery chances.

Let’s let Wolves beat writer Jerry Zgoda pick up the umbrage that flared from the Minnesota coach and president of basketball operations when he learned afterward about Bolerjack’s and Harpring’s disparaging asides during the telecast:

[Saunders] had just seen his team with only seven healthy players win in OT, at altitude, on the second night of back-to-back games. Instead of being in a celebratory mood, he was incensed after he returned to a joyous locker room and found what he said were 25 text messages informing him of comments made by Utah’s television broadcast earlier in the game.

… Jazz announcers said, to paraphrase, that teams purposely losing games to improve draft lottery odds by dressing only seven available players is bad for the league, bad for fans who pay good money to see Kevin Garnett and the league needs to do something about it.

Utah fans didn’t see Garnett, Ricky Rubio, Kevin Martin, Gary Neal or four other injured Wolves players Monday. They did see newly signed D League guard Sean Kilpatrick make three three-pointers in a fourth-quarter comeback, and they also saw Zach LaVine ignore a mental mistake with the game on the line and make two clutch threes in the final 21 seconds of regulation to force overtime anyway.

“That’s totally irresponsible, we’re not tanking games,” Saunders said. “If that’s so, then [Utah] got beat by a team who was tanking. … We’re playing to win. Our guys are out there: We won two games ago at New York, we lost in the fourth quarter against Charlotte last night. We’re not tanking games. It is irresponsible for them to go on TV saying that. If you work at ESPN, you get fired for saying stuff like that.”

The Wolves won for the second time in three games after they had lost 10 of 11 before that. They did so Monday by beating a Jazz team that had won 14 of its previous 19 games and had led by as many as eight points before the Wolves pulled a most improbable comeback.

It’s tempting to conclude, as The Bard might, that Saunders doth protested too much. His comments about people getting fired made it seem as if the Jazz announcers might have struck a nerve. Minnesota, after all, spent all but eight of its first 25 seasons prior to this one out of the playoffs, yet never, ever has gotten lucky enough in the lottery to move up even one spot in the draft order. Diving down for the worst possible record might be seen as their only way to land a franchise prospect – now that they have no more Kevin Loves to trade.

But the circumstances were all wrong Monday night. No team tanks, or does anything else, by using only seven players. And, ahem, the Wolves wound up winning in overtime.

Even Harpring seem reassured enough by that to tweet out an apology overnight:

Morning shootaround — March 24


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played March 23

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Howard’s return may come soon | Love opens up on season, playing with LeBron | Mavs worried about Ellis’ attitude? | Bird expects George to play this season

No. 1: Rockets may speed up comeback date for Howard – The Houston Rockets continue to get along just fine, even as center Dwight Howard nears the two-month mark in suiting up for them. Houston is 17-9 in the 26 games it has played since Howard went down with a knee injury on Jan. 23 and talk of late has been that he’ll be back in the lineup soon. But given a recent stretch of injuries Houston has suffered — and with the playoffs drawing closer — there’s a good chance Howard’s timetable for return may be bumped up. Jenny Dial Creech of the Houston Chronicle has more:

While there is no set return date for Rockets center Dwight Howard, coach Kevin McHale said it has to be soon.

After the team’s 110-100 win over the Pacers on Monday, McHale said he might have to start putting Howard back into games.

“We are so down on bodies and we don’t have a lot of practice time,” McHale said. “We might have to start throwing him out there and letting him get some minutes in the game, whether he starts out 15-20 minutes and getting game time. But he has to start playing here pretty soon because otherwise the season is just going to go by and you can’t wait for the playoffs to come back, so we’ll see.”

The Rockets next game is on Wednesday night in New Orleans.

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Westbrook loses his triple-double


VIDEO: Westbrooks’ notable night is now 12, 17, 9

It turns out there is one way to slow down the triple-double machine that has been Russell Westbrook lately. But it took a ruling by the NBA office to do it.

A video review of the game resulted in the league subtracting one rebound from Westbrook’s total from Sunday’s win over Miami, thus wiping out what would have been the Oklahoma City All-Star’s 10th triple-double of the season.

The league said that Westbrook was incorrectly credited with a rebound in the 93-75 victory. The correction means the Thunder point guard finished with 12 points, 17 assists and nine rebounds.

Westbrook now has nine triple-doubles on the season for an Oklahoma City team that at 40-30 entered Monday night with a 2½-game lead for the eighth spot in the Western Conference playoff picture.

Morning Shootaround — March 22

NEWS OF THE MORNING


VIDEO: Highlights from games played March 21

Aldridge re-injures hand in loss to Grizz | Pacers on the brink? | Steve Nash’s retirement felt hardest in Phoenix | Grizz move Green to bench

No. 1: Portland’s nightmare road trip — When it rains, it pours. After surviving an early-season injury to LaMarcus Aldridge, the Portland Trail Blazers managed to survive and become title contenders. But then Wesley Matthews went down for the season with a torn Achilles, and though they vowed to carry on without Matthews, the Blazers have had what they call a “nightmare” road trip. Now, with Nicolas Batum and Aldridge battling injuries, as Joe Freeman writes in The Oregonian, the Blazers may have reached their toughest point of the season:

A five-game trip that started with so much promise went from bad to worse on Saturday night as the Blazers not only lost 97-86 to the Memphis Grizzlies, but also lost two more key players to injuries.

If you’re counting, the Blazers have four players — three starters and their top backup big man — dealing with varying levels of injuries. And, as if that weren’t enough, they also happen to be in the middle of a four-game losing streak, the longest of the season. That impressive victory over the Toronto Raptors was only seven days ago, but it feels like seven months.

How might one describe that five-game trip?

“A nightmare,” Aldridge said.

And his health is reason No. 1 for that harsh reality. Aldridge injured his left hand — the same body part that already features a torn thumb ligament — with 4:37 left in the first quarter against the Grizzlies, when Tony Allen smacked it as he lunged for a steal.

On the play, Aldridge collected a pass from Damian Lillard just above the left elbow and drove toward the hoop. Zach Randolph charged from the middle and Allen blitzed from the left, reaching at Aldridge with his left hand to dislodge the ball, smacking Aldridge’s hand in the process. The four-time All-Star instantly winced and cupped his left hand with his right, a sight that no doubt sent a shiver across Rip City considering he has played with a bum left thumb since Jan. 24.

He played the rest of the  quarter and gave it a go in the second for six minutes, but did not play after halftime, finishing with 16 points and five rebounds in 18 minutes.

The good news? The results of in-game X-rays were negative. The bad news? After the game, Aldridge’s hand was swollen, in pain and he said he could not bend it.

“It didn’t exactly go the way we planned,” center Robin Lopez said of the Blazers’ five-game trip.

Despite the rash of injuries, the Blazers (44-24) actually held their own in the second half against the second-best team in the Western Conference. Less than 24 hours after an embarrassing loss to the Orlando Magic, the shorthanded Blazers trimmed an 18-point Memphis lead down to seven in the fourth quarter, causing 17,898 at the FedExForum squirm in their seats down the stretch. With Dorell Wright raining threes, snatching steals and completing smooth coast-to-coast layups, Lopez scoring inside and rebounding and Damian Lillard doing it all, the Blazers made things interesting.

But the Grizzlies (49-21) were too deep and talented to wilt completely, and in the end, Mike Conley (21 points, nine assists) was too good, Green (23 points, nine rebounds) was too smooth, Tony Allen (10 points, 11 rebounds, six steals) was too menacing and their long-range attack (11 for 18 from three-point range) was surprisingly too effective.

Lillard finished with 27 points and seven assists, CJ McCollum added 13 points and six rebounds and Wright had 10 points, six rebounds, two assists and two steals. But it was all for naught. And as the Blazers walked away from that postgame scene in the locker room, they chose not to dwell on the injuries or the losing streak.

Instead, they chose to look forward. They’ve no doubt reached their toughest moment of the season. But they insist they have plenty of fight left.

“We’ve got our backs up against the wall right now,” Lillard said, before adding, “I’m not concerned. We’ve just got to play better. If we play better, just keep doing what we’re doing, keep believing in each other, I think we’ll be fine.”


VIDEO: Blazers coach Terry Stotts discusses the team’s loss in Memphis

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Steve Nash calls it a career, but impact on game will live on


VIDEO: Steve Nash was a two-time MVP and one of the greatest players of his generation

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The debates about Steve Nash‘s place in the history of the NBA can officially begin now that the two-time MVP has officially announced his retirement.

What is not up for debate, however, is the impact Nash had on the teams he played for and the game. He helped usher in the pace and space era of the game while in Phoenix, where he also collected those back-to-back MVPs, in Mike D’Antoni‘s system. A super team featuring Kobe Bryant, Nash, Pau Gasol and Dwight Howard in Los Angeles Lakers uniforms never materialized as Nash and Howard battled injuries that derailed the championship aspirations for that group during the 2012-13 season.

Nash’s 19-year career comes to a close with him finishing third behind John Stockton and Jason Kidd on the all-time assists list at 10,355. But Nash could not suit up for the Los Angeles Lakers this season due to injuries. Nash told ESPN’s Marc Stein that it’s “really difficult to put it into words,” now that his career is over. But he did it better than anyone else could in a letter to The Players’ Tribune website, where he broke the news of his own retirement earlier today:

The greatest gift has been to be completely immersed in my passion and striving for something I loved so much — visualizing a ladder, climbing up to my heroes. The obsession became my best friend. I talked to her, cherished her, fought with her and got knocked on my ass by her.

And that is what I’m most thankful for in my career. In my entire life, in some ways. Obviously, I value my kids and my family more than the game, but in some ways having this friend — this ever-present pursuit — has made me who I am, taught me and tested me, and given me a mission that feels irreplaceable. I am so thankful. I’ve learned so many invaluable lessons about myself and about life. And of course I still have so much to learn. Another incredible gift.

Nash went on to thank many of his coaches, teammates, family, friends and other influences, making it a point to identify those who helped him go from a Canada to college star at Santa Clara to a NBA star and eventually one of the all-time greats:

Don Nelson insisted that I score. I always wanted to pass but he said, “It’s goddamn selfish when you don’t shoot.” Or, “If you’re a dominant fucking player — dominate!” He insisted that I be aggressive. That growth was a turning point in my career.

Mike D’Antoni changed the game of basketball. There’s not many people you can say that about. No wonder I had my best years playing for him. His intelligence guided him to never over-coach, complicate or hide behind the game’s traditions. He deserves a championship.

When I dribbled by our bench as a rookie on the Suns, Danny Ainge would say, “Take him!” with intensity and contempt in his voice. That was a huge vote of confidence for a rookie.

I remember when Dirk [Nowitzki] and I were nobodies. He used to say over dinner sometimes, “How are us two stiffs gonna make it in this league?” Somehow we made something of ourselves. After all the wins and all the great times we’ve had around the world together, what really means the most to me are the late nights early in our careers when we’d go back to the Landry Center in Dallas, to play a few more games of HORSE and one-on-one. Dirk and the great city of Dallas got their championship, and I couldn’t be happier for them.

Michael Finley was twice an All-Star in his prime, when Dirk and I were young guys on the Mavs. Michael never played in another All-Star Game, but our team went from last place to the Conference Finals under his watch. Do you know how rare that unselfishness is in our game? A true friend and teammate.

The most accurate free throw shooter in NBA history, Nash served as the point guard for the top offense in the NBA for a staggering nine straight seasons (encompassing part of his time in Dallas, 2001-02, through 2008-09 in Phoenix). An eight-time All-Star, seven-time All-NBA pick and five-time assists leader, Nash also won the celebrated J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award in 2007.

His impact on the game, around the globe, will be felt for years.

His underdog story resonates, no matter what language one speaks, as Nash (in his own words) prepares himself for “Life After Basketball.”

I will likely never play basketball again. It’s bittersweet. I already miss the game deeply, but I’m also really excited to learn to do something else. This letter is for anyone who’s taken note of my career. At the heart of this letter, I’m speaking to kids everywhere who have no idea what the future holds or how to take charge of their place in it. When I think of my career, I can’t help but think of the kid with his ball, falling in love. That’s still what I identify with and did so throughout my entire story.

Collapsed Lung Sidelines Rockets’ Jones Indefinitely

The Rockets believe that if they can ever get all of their big men healthy and on the court together, they could make big noise in the rapidly approaching playoffs.

But the latest sound out of Houston is another loud thud with the news that power forward Terrence Jones will be sidelined indefinitely with a collapsed lung. According to Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle, Jones will be out indefinitely after suffering his latest injury Thursday night against the Nuggets.

Jones had previously missed 43 games this season, 41 of them due to a nerve inflammation that threatened his career. The Rockets have played the last 24 games without star center Dwight Howard, who has been recovering from a painful swelling in his right knee.

“Guys have to step up,” Rockets coach Kevin McHale said. “I sure wish Kostas (Papanikolaou, who has been out for 13 games with a sprained ankle) was ready to play, but he’s not ready to play, either. We just have to deal with it and go.

“We’ll play smaller more. That’s the bottom line, but we’ve played small some. Joey’s going to have to be really on point. Joey (Dorsey) is going to have to play and bang against the bigger guys and we’re going to have to get Josh (Smith) play more minutes, of course. And D-Mo (Donatas Motiejunas) is going to have a big load. And James has been good at guarding a lot of post guys down there, very strong. We’ll have to double team more in the post. We’ll have to make it work.”

The Rockets play at home against Phoenix on Saturday before leaving on a five-game road trip to Indiana, New Orleans, Minnesota, Washington and Toronto.