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Howard gets plasma treatment on knee

Dwight Howard doesn't know what happened to his knee (Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports).

Dwight Howard is unsure what happened to his knee (Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports).

Dwight Howard still doesn’t know exactly when it happened or how he hurt his right knee. But he has stepped up the level of therapy by getting a “PRP treatment” in hope of getting back onto the court as soon as possible.

Platelet-rich plasma therapy is the same procedure that Kobe Bryant had performed on his knee in 2013 and Howard turned to it after missing Wednesday’s 98-92 loss to Bryant and the Lakers.

The injury comes at a time when Howard’s Rockets have hit their first two-game losing streak of the season and have been in an offensive slump for two weeks. After scoring more than 100 points in five straight double-digit wins to open the season, the Rockets have cracked the century mark just once and are 3-3 since Nov. 8.

Now Houston faces a Saturday night visit from the NBA’s top offensive team, the Mavericks, without their All-Star stopper in the middle.

According to Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle, Howard is still holding out hope to get back onto the court right away, but Rockets coach Kevin McHale is thinking that Howard is “probably out:”

“It feels a lot better,” Howard said. “I had to get a shot in it to clear some of the stuff out it. I’m trying to do whatever I can to get back on the floor.”

In a platelet-rich plasma therapy a patient’s blood is placed in a centrifuge and spun to separate the platelet-rich plasma. The concentrated platelets are then injected back into the injured tissue. Rockets athletic trainer Keith Jones confirmed Howard underwent “platelet rich protein therapy,” another term for Howard’s PRP treatment.

PRP therapy is generally used as a long-term treatment, rather than to promote a quick recovery for a player seeking to return to the court, though Howard held out hope that he would not miss too much time.

“We’ll see how it feels tomorrow,” Howard said. “I was in a lot of pain after the Memphis game. I (said) it was just bumps and bruises. I thought it was just something I could sleep off. But when I got home and the next day, any movement I tried was causing a lot of pain.”

Howard said does not recall any incident during the Memphis game on Monday, but said that after the game that he “couldn’t really walk on it.

“Last game, I tried to do everything I can to play, did every drill, everything possible until the game started and there was nothing I could do,” Howard said. “Hopefully, it feels better tomorrow.
“I did everything to get myself ready to play. It just wasn’t happening. They wanted me to play in the post-season and later on in the season. I didn’t want to sit out. I was very upset about it.”

Asked if he is definitely out on Saturday, Howard said, “I have no idea.”

Report: Nets’ Kirilenko may soon be bought out or traded

It seems almost inevitable now, according to the New York Post, that small forward Andrei Kirilenko is facing a limited future with the team.

The 6-foot-9 Russian forward wasn’t with the Nets on their trip to Oklahoma City Friday and San Antonio Saturday for personal reasons apart from basketball. But Kirilenko’s lack of involvement when around – just 36 minutes in seven games, scoring a total of three points – had the Post’s Tim Bontemps assessing the likelihood that the player and his $3.3 million expiring contract either will be traded or bought out:

Sources said no buyout negotiations have taken place yet, but that it’s possible the team could try to trade Kirilenko and his $3.3 million expiring contract. If such a trade were to materialize, it would likely be after Dec. 15, when all rookies and players signed to contracts this summer are eligible to be moved.

If a trade doesn’t materialize, it seems inevitable that a buyout would be reached at some point.

When asked if he could elaborate on the situation after the team’s morning shootaround [in Oklahoma City, coach Lionel] Hollins said he could not. Asked if he was expecting Kirilenko back with the team once the Nets returned home, Hollins said, “I don’t know.”

Either way, it’s hard to see Kirilenko in a significant role with this team again.

He was made a healthy scratch for losses to the Heat and Bucks at home this week, and after the Miami defeat on Monday said he felt fine physically and had “no idea” what he had to do to get back into Hollins’ rotation.

Those who thought Kirilenko’s kinship and shared heritage with Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov would serve him well (and even smelled something fishy) when he turned down a one-year, $10 million option from Minnesota to sign a two-year, $6.5 million deal with Brooklyn might want to reconsider, if they haven’t yet.

Back issues limited Kirilenko to 45 games last season in which he averaged 19 minutes, 5.0 points and 3.2 rebounds. As Bontemps noted, he wasn’t used in two of the Nets’ 12 playoff games against Toronto and Miami, and his hopes of a greater role with Hollins replacing Jason Kidd as coach have not materialized.

Relax? Easier said than done for LeBron


VIDEO: LeBron James says being patient this season has been a challenge for him

Maybe if Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers weren’t otherwise indisposed, LeBron James could have called on him to offer words of advice to Cleveland fans worried about, and NBA experts critical of, the Cavaliers’ unimpressive 5-5 start.

But it’s not clear that James’ message is as simple as “Relax.”

James’ needle was pointed in that direction when he announced his return to Cleveland in July, though that part of his message might have gotten swamped in the exuberance of The Decision II. He has said at various times in the preseason and early season that it would take time for the re-tooled Cavs to find their groove and identity. Heck, James said it in several ways as recently as Wednesday night, after a 92-90 home loss to San Antonio had them sifting through the disappointment for bright spots like some wannabe lottery team.

But his tone had shifted significantly by Friday morning, after Cleveland’s shootaround in Washington for its game with the Wizards (8 p.m. ET, ESPN). Had Rodgers shown up to drop a “R-E-L-A-X” on James at the Verizon Center, the four-time MVP might have sacked him. As reported by Chris Haynes of the Northeast Ohio Media Group:

“That’s my biggest test,” [James] said. “My patience, I have a low tolerance for things of this nature, so it’s something I’m working on as well, which I knew from the beginning, that it was going to be my biggest test to see how much patience I have with the process.

“What helps me out is that I’ve been through it before, but at the same time, I’m a winner and I want to win and I want to win now. It’s not tomorrow. It’s not down the line. I want to win now. So, it’s a fine line for me, but I understand what we’re enduring right now.”

That differs from the essay James penned with SI.com’s Lee Jenkins when he chose to return to Cleveland over extending his stay with the Miami Heat. Remember?

I’m not promising a championship. I know how hard that is to deliver. We’re not ready right now. No way. Of course, I want to win next year, but I’m realistic. It will be a long process, much longer than it was in 2010. My patience will get tested.

For the record, the Heat started 9-8 in James’ first year in south Florida, teaming with stars (Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh) who were more advanced in their own careers than Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love. But they figured things out in time to reach The Finals.

Also for the record, the Cavs faced a tough back-to-back this weekend against the Wizards on the road and then home against Toronto Saturday. Oh, and the Packers were 1-2 when Rodgers urge calm on the cheeseheads of Packers nation. They’ve gone 6-1 since.

Morning shootaround — Nov. 21


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 20

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Pierce: Rivalry with LeBron ‘misunderstood’ | Cavs’ Love still searching for his role | Van Gundy fires back at Markieef Morris | Rivers standing by Redick

No. 1: Pierce: Rivalry with LeBron ‘misunderstood’ — The Cleveland Cavaliers from LeBron James‘ first tour of duty there took on Paul Pierce‘s Boston Celtics crew in two separate East semifinals series (2008 and ’10), losing both times. Those matchups — plus others between James’ Miami Heat teams and Pierce’s Celtics, and later, Brooklyn Nets — spurred a notion that Pierce and James don’t like each other personally. In an interview with J. Michael of CSNWashington.com, though, Pierce says that’s hardly the truth:

For Friday’s showdown between the Wizards and Cleveland Cavaliers, there are so many subplots in play: The preseason war of words between the backcourts; the rivalry between the teams during LeBron James’ first stint with his hometown team; and Eastern Conference playoff position. But the main plot will focus on Paul Pierce and James.

“I think a lot of it is misunderstood. If I see LeBron walking down the street, it’s not going to be no fistfight. I got a lot of respect for him,” said Pierce, who had triumphs and failures against him as a member of the Boston Celtics and last season with the Brooklyn Nets. “The competitive nature of both of us, being at the same position, being on top teams, gunning for the same trophy year in and year out, that’s where that comes in to play. It’s like fighting for the same girl. Why do I want to be cool with that guy?

“I’ve got total respect for him as a person. It’s just the things that we go through are all on the court and that’s where we leave it.”

“It’s something about great players when they play in certain arenas, when they play against other great players they elevate their play,” Pierce said about the stakes being raised Friday. “LeBron is one of those guys. He feels the moment. He understands the moment. This could be a moment tomorrow. We’ve got to be prepared for it.’

More wisdom from Pierce:

  • On the Cavs now: “Their record doesn’t show how good they’re going to be. … We’re going to have a lot of games like this throughout the course of the year. We got to be ready for this. We got to start expecting playoff-type atmospheres, playoff-type level of play. It’s time for us to start raising our level of play when these type of teams come in, Dallas, Cleveland, whoever.”
  • On James’ return home: “I was definitely surprised. With the run that they had in Miami, them going to four straight Finals that that wouldn’t deter him, losing in the Finals. I thought they built something special there. Obviously, Cleveland has a special place in his heart and he felt like he left something behind but it’s good for him. It’s good for the game of basketball. Shifts the balance of power. We know how tough it is to  put together a team and try to win a championship in that first year which makes the Eastern Conference that much wide open.”

(more…)

Rose, Gasol out vs. Kings

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – Nothing new on the Derrick Rose front. He’ll miss his third straight game with a strained left hamstring when the Chicago Bulls visit the Sacramento Kings on TNT Thursday (10:30 p.m. ET).

The Bulls will also be without Pau Gasol, who’s dealing with a strained left calf, as ESPNChicago.com’s Nick Friedell reports

“[They’re] just not ready,” Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said before Thursday’s shootaround.

This will be the third straight game Rose has missed after initially injuring the hamstring in last Thursday’s win over the Toronto Raptors, and the seventh game total. He missed four games earlier this season because of sprained ankles. Gasol, who along with swingman Jimmy Butler has now missed two straight games because the calf injury, is hopeful he will be back on the floor soon.

“I didn’t feel a pop,” Gasol said of the injury. “It just started bothering me. It started being sore. I was hoping I got hit but I couldn’t recall getting hit. So then you had to figure it was a muscle strain and strains usually take their time to heal and scar. So I’m just trying to let it heal.”

The Bulls are 4-2 without Rose, but have been better on both offense and defense with him on the floor. They beat the Clippers on Monday without Rose or Gasol.

Morning shootaround — Nov. 20


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 19

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Blatt wants more from all of Cavs | Kidd rips into Nets’ brass | Carter’s emotional tribute in Toronto | Cuban touting new in-arena technology

No. 1: Blatt wants better play across board from Cavs — The Cavs had last night’s game against the Spurs in a situation they couldn’t have dreamed up better: down one point, with LeBron James bringing the ball up court with seconds left to go in the game. But as James crossed halfcourt, he lost his dribble, Manu Ginobili scooped up the loose ball and San Antonio had a 92-90 win. Afterward, coach David Blatt pointed out how the Cavs can’t keep counting on LeBron to save their bacon every night, writes Chris Haynes of the Northeast Ohio Media Group:

That last possession is not what put the Cavaliers in a situation where they are now standing a subpar 5-5. James had a rough go offensively. Spurs foward Kawhi Leonard did a phenomenal job shadowing James and forcing him into help zones.

James ended the night with 15 points on 6-of-17 shooting, with six rebounds and nine assists.

“Kawhi is a really, really good defender and T.D. (Tim Duncan) is kind of always protecting the paint,” James said. “They want everybody in the paint to try to make it tough on me. I missed some shots. They did a great job forcing me into some tougher shots that didn’t go for me.”

When James doesn’t play well offensively, the Cavaliers tend to follow suit. He is averaging 32.6 points and shooting 53 percent in wins and 19.2 points and 39 percent in losses.

Those numbers are not a newfound revelation, but according to head coach David Blatt it shouldn’t be an excuse for others not to bring it.

“What I would say to that is we all have to step up,” Blatt said. “Not just one guy. One guy is not responsible for a whole team. I’m not going to throw out any names or throw anybody under the bus, but the thing about a team is, if everyone is engaged, I think each and every guy has to step up and make himself felt and contribute what he can to the game.”

Clearly not enough guys stepped up in James’ time of need. But overall, Blatt felt his team came ready to play, which was not the case Monday in a home loss to Denver.

“I thought we played it with the right level of intensity, focus and determination,” he said.

Defense wasn’t the issue this time. Blatt made it a point to single out Kyrie Irving, calling it his best defensive game of the season for his play on Spurs guard Tony Parker, who was 2-of-7 and had eight points in 33 minutes.

Coughing the ball up is what players harped on. The last thing any team wants to do is hand the Spurs’ efficiently-run offense extra possessions.

“Turnovers killed us,” Anderson Varejao said. “At the end of the game we had a couple of bad ones and I believe that’s why we lost.”


VIDEO: The Spurs handle the Cavs in an early season East vs. West showdown (more…)

Kobe won’t pile on Howard with K.D.

HOUSTON — Kobe Bryant’s contentious history with Dwight Howard, as both teammate and opponent, is well-documented. The pair had a scrap in the season opener at Staples Center.

But on a night when Howard sat out of a 98-92 loss to L.A. due to a strained right knee, Bryant did not want to jump into the war of words between the Rockets center and Kevin Durant of the Thunder.

When Howard and Durant got into an argument Sunday night in Oklahoma City, Durant reportedly called Howard an expletive that questioned his manhood.

“No, I don’t feel that way,” Bryant said. “And I don’t think Kevin does either. At moments of confrontation during a game you’ll say things in the heat of the moment. I know Dwight. I’m sure Kevin does. We don’t feel that way about him.

“You get in an argument with somebody, you’ll say things out of frustration, out of anger that you really don’t mean. It’s a heat of the battle, heat of the moment.

“You (media) guys have all been in arguments, guys that are married. Sometimes you say things that you want to take back, that you don’t really mean. But it’s in the heat of confrontation.”

Because of knee, Dwight won’t see Kobe

Dwight Howard complained of a sprained right knee and sat out Wednesday’s rematch against Kobe Bryant, which of course only means two things are now inflamed: the knee, and the “soft” rap against Howard which came courtesy of Kobe.

The Lakers-Rockets game was the first meeting between the teams since the season opener, when Howard and Kobe competed against each other for the first time since Howard left the Lakers two summers ago. Their relationship wasn’t the best then, and when they exchanged elbows with seven minutes in the opener, won easily by the Rockets, it only escalated in public view.

Once they were separated, not only did Kobe call out Howard by saying “try me” repeatedly, he also yelled “soft.” Lakers coach Byron Scott said the obvious: “They don’t like each other. It’s as simple as that.”

Well, then. It could be a bit of frustration on Kobe’s behalf, because the downfall of the Lakers began when Howard signed as a free agent with the Rockets, rather than stick around in L.A. during Kobe’s sunset. The Lakers haven’t been a winner since, and began this season losing nine of their first 10. Meanwhile, Howard and the Rockets are second only to the Grizzlies in the West.

Speaking of Memphis, Howard said he tweaked the knee against the Grizzlies but appeared to downplay the injury, calling it “bumps and bruises” following a back-to-back. Howard also didn’t raise the knee as an issue earlier Wednesday at the morning shootaround, but apparently discomfort set in shortly thereafter.

Fixing defensive downfalls remains job No. 1 for Cavaliers


VIDEO: GameTime’s crew discusses what the Cavs must do to shore up their defense

CLEVELAND – It sounded like the old Steve Martin joke, advising people how to be a millionaire and never pay taxes (“First, get a million dollars. Then…”). Someone asked Gregg Popovich how he and his San Antonio coaching staff get players not known for their defense to “buy in” to the Spurs’ system so they uphold that team’s stingy reputation.

“I don’t bring anybody in like that,” Popovich said after the Spurs’ shootaround session Wednesday at Quicken Loans Arena. “Except maybe [Marco] Belinelli. He’s trying.”

Even the trigger-happy Belinelli got vetted through Tom Thibodeau‘s five-guys-on-a-string tactics in Chicago for a year before Popovich and general manager R.C. Buford signed him in July 2013.

The Cavaliers imposed no such prohibitions when they came together this offseason, parts being bolted around LeBron James in a flurry of trades and free-agent acquisitions. The incumbent backcourt of Kyrie Irving and Dion Waiters had no particular defensive chops. Power forward Kevin Love racks up formidable rebounding numbers but otherwise hadn’t shown much defensive proclivities. Center Anderson Varejao is energetic and aggressive in the paint, but Love and Tristan Thompson aren’t bonafide rim protectors. Shooters Mike Miller and James Jones are, well, shooters. And even James’ defense seemed to slip a notch in his last season with Miami.

Through nine games, Cleveland’s defensive rating of 108.3 was tied for fifth-worst in the league. That’s not just worse than his Heat team’s performance last season (102.9), it’s worse than the 2013-14 Cavaliers managed (104.8) on their way to a 33-49 record.

The Cavs have given up 100 points or more seven times, and their defensive effective field-goal percentage of .536, which adjusts for the premium on 3-pointers, is third-worst in the NBA, better only than the Lakers (.551) and Minnesota (.559). The breakdowns in Cleveland’s schemes are clear, from zone coverage to pick-and-roll misdirections to some poor or lazy individual habits.

So while everyone has focused on the blending of offensive styles and responsibilities of James, Love, Irving and the rest, Cleveland opponents have found it awfully easy to score – a flaw the Cavaliers can’t afford to ignore.

“I don’t think it’s something you learn on the fly,” James said Wednesday. “I think it’s something you work on every single day. You teach it, you preach it, you demand it. I didn’t come [into the NBA] as being a big defensive guy. I played defense and my high school coaches did preach it, and we knew in order to win, we had to defend. This is a different level.

“When [former Cavs coach] Mike Brown came to this team, that was just his whole mindset, saying, ‘If we don’t defend, we can’t win.’ And he preached it every day. It was just instilled in us as players. You’ve got to teach it, you’ve got to preach it, you’ve got to demand it every single day.”

Sounds like current Cavs coach David Blatt is there now, too.

“You have to raise the level of expectation,” Blatt said the other day, “and the level of accountability, and you have to make the whole greater than the sum of its parts. Sometimes if you’re not blessed with great individual defenders, your principles have to be that much stronger, and your helps and your court recognition have to be that much better. And that’s why it’s taken us longer in that area of the game than on the offensive end.”

San Antonio, by contrast, ranks third in the NBA in defensive rating (96.0) after finishing fourth (100.1) last season and tied for third (99.2) two years ago. A team whose main pieces have been together for multiple seasons might be expected to have an edge, though effort and priorities matter as much or more.

The Cavs’ familiarity will grow, but it’s on them to drag the defense along. Bumping up Shawn Marion‘s minutes has helped some, and there has been chatter about pursuing Timberwolves wing Corey Brewer in trade. Still, a roster overhaul is unlikely and any defensive makeover will require lipstick (and more) on what so far has been a pig.

“Defensively we just need more than anything to just trust each other,” Love said. “We’re all capable, especially as a team. We’ve got to take the individual battle. But at the end of the day, we need to trust each other that we need to help each other out.”


VIDEO: LeBron James is driven to get the Cavs back to winning consistently

 

Report: Beal to return from injury

HANG TIME BIG CITY — After fracturing his wrist during the preseason, Washington Wizards guard Bradley Beal will make his season debut tonight against the Dallas Mavericks, according to a report from the Washington Post.

Last season, his second campaign in the NBA, the 6-foot-5 Beal averaged 17.1 points per game and teamed with John Wall to give the Wizards one of the NBA’s best backcourts. Thus far the Wizards have replaced Beal in the starting lineup with Garrett Temple and are off to a 7-2 start.

According to the Post

Beal will come off the bench and be on a minutes limit as he works his way back to game action. The slick shooter sustained a non-displaced fracture of the scaphoid bone in his non-shooting wrist in the second quarter of a preseason game against the Charlotte Hornets on Oct. 10. He underwent surgery two days later.

Coach Randy Wittman told reporters Tuesday that Beal’s status would not be decided until Beal was evaluated Wednesday morning, but Beal has worked out the last two nights and participated in live competition Tuesday night without a hitch.

UPDATE, 12:13 p.m. ET: Beal said during Wednesday’s practice no decision has been made yet on his status tonight and he’ll be a gametime decision