2015 Free Agency

Jordan apologizes to Cuban, Mavs


VIDEO: Video: Isiah Thomas on DeAndre Jordan’s decision to stay in L.A.

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — After signing his new contract with the Los Angeles Clippers, DeAndre Jordan reportedly went on a cruise.

But he took a break from his vacation to reach out to Mark Cuban and the Mavericks, who he left hanging after a change of heart regarding the next four years of his career. Jordan, an unrestricted free agent, had originally decided to sign with the Mavericks, but ultimately returned to L.A. after a wild Wednesday in Houston.

We had heard Cuban’s side of the story, but Jordan remained (publicly) silent until Friday night.

Jordan was criticized for not contacting Cuban himself after changing his mind. His two tweets make it clear that he knows he could have acted differently. He’ll still get booed vociferously the first time the Clippers visit the American Airlines Center next season.

Mavericks’ Cuban gives his version of Jordan free-agent story


VIDEO: Isiah Thomas and David Aldridge chime in on the DeAndre Jordan move

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban offered up his side of the DeAndre Jordan free-agent fiasco Friday morning, going public vis his Cyber Dust social media format.

After Jordan backed away from his verbal assurance he would sign as a free agent with the Mavericks on a four-year, $80 million contract, instead returning to the Los Angeles Clippers for four years and a reported $87 million, Cuban took issue with some of the media reports.

Here is his account of the lost deal with the 6-foot-11 center:

Dear Mavs fans,

After all the nonsense coming from an ESPN employee on Twitter, I thought I would provide the events of the day on Tuesday.

Through all of Monday we were texting back and forth discussing players available, the amount of cap room we had left. Who our staff liked. Who he liked. How excited he was.

Then on Tuesday the communications basically stopped and we started hearing rumblings from multiple people that something was up.

So I flew down to Houston and got a room at the galleria, which is just a few minutes from his house. I had my driver take me to his house. It’s inside a small gated community but the gate was wide open so we drove in and I literally walked up to his door.

There was no one home. So I texted him saying that I was there. I know something is up. Let’s talk. He texted me that he was on a date.

I told him to have fun. I wasn’t in a rush, that I was happy to come by there and say hi or if he wanted to make the date fun, take them to Dallas for a night out.

He didn’t respond.

After about 10 minutes I went back to the hotel. I wasn’t going to sit in front of his house. I didn’t think that was right.

When I got back to the hotel I texted him that I wasn’t in front of his house. Have fun on his date and we will talk.

He hit me back immediately saying thanks.

He knew I was in town. He knew I was close by. I knew something was up. I was getting the same reports everyone else was.

I also knew this agents were coming to town. It made sense that he would talk to them and worst case, even if he was having second thoughts the agent would be able to give me updates.

Like any big career move it’s natural to have second thoughts. So while I was concerned, I still wasn’t worried. So I went to bed.

More to come.

And for those who care. I like this medium because it’s like having a face to face conversation. I can say what I want. No trolls. I can reach any size audience. And respond to people easily.

I will also reblast this to +blogmaverick

+letsgomavs and Dust On

 

Morning shootaround — July 10


VIDEO: How do the Mavs move on after DeAndre Jordan’s reversal?

Parsons: Jordan ‘scared’ of being franchise player | Report: D-Will wants to land in Dallas | Presti says OKC will match Kanter’s offer sheet

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Parsons: Jordan was ‘scared’ to be franchise player — There are, understandably, some sore feelings in Dallas in the wake of DeAndre Jordan changing his mind about signing with the Mavericks on Thursday morning. Mavs owner Mark Cuban revealed some of his thoughts but basically said he’d wait a while before fully delving into the topic. The same could not be said for small forward Chandler Parsons, who played a big role in wooing Jordan to Dallas and didn’t hold back about the big man’s changed outlook on free agency. Tim McMahon of ESPNDallas.com has more:

Dallas Mavericks small forward Chandler Parsons, who led the team’s recruiting campaign for DeAndre Jordan, described himself as “shocked, very disappointed, frustrated, disrespected” that the big man reneged on his verbal commitment to join the Mavs and re-signed with the Los Angeles Clippers.

“This is something that I’ve never seen in my career, and I know that it doesn’t happen very often,” Parsons told ESPN.com on Thursday. “When a man gives you his word and an organization his word, especially when that organization put in so much effort and I walked him through this process and was very, very open and willing to work with him, it’s just very unethical and disrespectful.”

When Jordan made his original commitment, Dallas still had a couple of decent potential backup plans to fill its void at center, such as trading for Roy Hibbert or signing Kosta Koufos. At this point, the Mavs are left scrambling, likely destroying their chances to contend for a Western Conference playoff spot.

That’s a hard pill for Parsons to swallow days after celebrating the commitment of a fellow 26-year-old he believed would become a perennial All-Star and MVP candidate with a featured role in Dallas.

“He wasn’t ready to be a franchise player. He was scared,” Parsons said. “He was scared to take the next step in his career. There was no other reason other than that he was comfortable and he has friendships there. How you make a business decision like that is beyond me. How you ignore an owner like Mark who is in your hometown just waiting for a chance to talk to you is beyond me.

“I don’t think he made a mistake. I think he’ll be good in L.A. He’s got a good team, he’s got a great point guard, he’s got Blake, but I think he could have been a superstar in Dallas. He could have been the man in Dallas. Never in a million years did I think that this was even a possibility.

“I’ll still be friends with him, but I can’t get over the way that he’s put our entire franchise in jeopardy. It’s normal to get cold feet. It’s normal to get second thoughts, but you don’t back out of a commitment of this much magnitude this late in the game and just leave us high and dry.”

Jordan’s decision to intentionally ignore Cuban, who traveled to Houston on Wednesday in anticipation of an 11th-hour meeting, particularly bothered Parsons.

“The kind of guy that he is, the kind of guy I thought he is, would never do something like that,” Parsons said. “That’s tough for me to swallow, just from the fact that I know how excited Mark was. I know how invested Mark has been throughout this whole process. That’s what I don’t get.

“Be a professional. Pick up the phone. If you’re not going to meet with him, pick up the phone and tell the guy that you’re committed to what you’re feeling, what you’re going through and maybe he can talk it out and help you. But do not ignore the guy. Do not make him sit there and sweat it out. That’s just very unprofessional. I can’t get over that part.”

*** (more…)

Trail Blazers make play for Kanter

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — Restricted free agency has been pretty darn restricted over the last few years.

This summer, 12 restricted free agents (including Jimmy Butler, Draymond Green and Kawhi Leonard) have already re-signed (or agreed to re-sign) with their current teams. Only one – Kyle O’Quinn, via sign-and-trade deal from Orlando to New York – has changed teams. And no restricted free agents had signed (or agreed to sign) an offer sheet … until Thursday.

With the departures of LaMarcus Aldridge, Robin Lopez and Wesley Matthews, the Blazers have more than enough cap space to offer Kanter a maximum contract, which would start at $16.4 million. Portland already has four true bigs – Ed Davis, Chris Kaman, Meyers Leonard and Mason Plumlee – on the roster. Newly signed Al-Farouq Aminu is also, at his best, a power forward. But at 23 years old, Kanter would give them another building block as they transition from two straight 50-win seasons.

The Thunder will have three days to do match the offer sheet once they receive it. Doing so would cost them more than his salary.

If they choose not to match, the Thunder would have 14 players under contract and be about $2.5 million under the luxury tax line. If they did match the offer sheet, they’d be looking at more than $26 million in luxury taxes, in addition to the extra $16.4 million of salary.

OKC could try to unload the contracts of D.J. Augustin ($3.0 million next season), Perry Jones ($2.0 million) and Steve Novak ($3.8 million) to lower their tax bill on a team or teams that still have cap space. The departure of Augustin would put some pressure on 14th pick Cameron Payne to step in right away as the backup point guard, but the other two wouldn’t necessarily be missed.

Of course, the Thunder have the depth up front – with Jones, Mitch McGary and Nick Collison behind Serge Ibaka and Steven Adams – to deal with the departure of Kanter.

The Thunder got Kanter in a deadline trade in which they gave up Reggie Jackson and a protected first round pick. Kanter averaged 18.7 points and 11.0 rebounds in 26 games (all starts) after he arrived, but is a disaster defensively; The Thunder allowed 110.4 points per 100 possessions with him on the floor. He played only nine games with Ibaka before Ibaka was lost to a knee injury.

Duncan, James set to re-sign


VIDEO: Digging in on the Cavs’ offseason moves

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The two best free agents of 2015 (and given good health, the two best bargains of the coming season) didn’t reach agreements with their teams until Thursday, the ninth day of free agency and the first day when deals could be officially signed.

Of course, we knew all along that Tim Duncan and LeBron James were going back to San Antonio and Cleveland, respectively. But we were waiting on the terms of Duncan’s deal and for James to break his silence and/or get back from his vacation.

According to our David Aldridge, Duncan will be back with the Spurs for just $5 million this season, meaning that his former back-up, Aron Baynes, will be getting more money from the Detroit Pistons. It also means that the Spurs have additional flexibility under the salary cap after they sign Duncan and LaMarcus Aldridge (to a max contract starting at $19.7 million), with cap holds for Danny Green and Kawhi Leonard on the books. They could have about $2.2 million to offer a new back-up center.

James, meanwhile, is taking the maximum allowed from the Cavs, as expected.

He can opt out again next season and sign a more lucrative deal for 2016-17. And it would make sense for him to become a free agent again in 2017 (for the fourth straight summer) to really get paid after that, when the salary cap reaches its peak and when the Cavs have his full Bird rights.

The Cavs have new deals in place with James, Kevin Love and Iman Shumpert, as well as with the returning Mo Williams. They’ve yet to reach agreements with restricted free agents Matthew Dellavedova and Tristan Thompson, and J.R. Smith seems to be hanging in the wind at this point.

Cleveland also has yet to find a deal for Brendan Haywood‘s non-guaranteed, $10.5 million deal for next season.

Blogtable, DeAndre Edition: What you’ll remember most is …?

In this special edition of the Blogtable, we’re asking our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the DeAndre Jordan free-agency saga — and give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Impact on Clippers? | Impact on Mavs? | What you’ll remember most?



VIDEOAn emoji battle wages on during the DeAndre Jordan decision

> Emoji wars, Twitter all abuzz, Mavs and Clippers assembling a la The Avengers to sway DeAndre — which of these things (or maybe something else) will you most remember from the DeAndre decision?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWhat we witnessed wasn’t unprecedented, but it ought to be. Breaking a verbal agreement isn’t honorable, nor is swooping in at the 11th hour to encourage it. Had Jordan told all involved he would mull over his decision until the moratorium ended, fine, he’d have remained in play. But that’s not how this went. This sort of episode encourages cut-throat behavior all around. And unfortunately, there were some marking execs and media types loving it simply because it “had people talking about the NBA” for one more summer day. Yeah, well, carnival geeks get people talking, too. What I’ll likely remember from this is that, instead of teams only lining up at 12:01 a.m. on July 1 to be the first ones in the room with a new free agent, this is what started them mobilizing at 11:59 p.m. at the moratorium’s back end to be the last ones in the room. Just to make sure a deal is a deal is a deal.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Just the thought of Doc Rivers and Blake Grifin barricading the doors of DeAndre’s house with furniture against a possible invasion of desperate Cubanites waving stacks of cash and the image of Chris Paul riding to the rescue on a banana boat. And hoo boy, am I looking forward to the announcement of the 2015-16 schedule with the Clippers at Dallas on Christmas. C’mon, Adam Silver. Show us you get it.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Don’t mention the E word again. I’m doing everything possible to un-see that part of the silliness, although I’m afraid we’ve just seen the start of a trend. The rest of it will be impossible to forget, especially the biggest takeaway of all: How the fate of two franchises changed in one crazy day as the world followed along. The basketball part is the bottom line because that will have implications for years. We may not know the real outcome of Wednesday for years, until seeing how things turned out for the Clippers and Mavericks. DeAndre Jordan showed a lack of maturity and professionalism by not doing the very least he could do and treat Dallas with respect, but that’s for him to sort through. The rest of us will watch the basketball aspect unfold.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comWhat I’ll remember is sitting in my chair for 8 hours reading Twitter, the longest I’ve been locked on that site continuously in like forever. Blake Griffin dropped the Twitter mic with the chair-against-the-door pic. I think he has a future in entertainment.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comBlake Griffin’s tweet of the chair against the front door was my favorite moment. It made me laugh out loud and then have to explain the entire ridiculous situation to my wife.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The emoji war was epic, with Kobe Bryant and eventually the fine folks from @Jumpman23 dropping the mic on a crazy day that proved to be Twitter gold for all involved. If the Clippers find their way to the conference finals and perhaps beyond during the next five years, then maybe I’ll change my mind. But until then, the mobilization of the Clippers’ entire basketball operation to get to Houston and secure DeAndre’s services will continue to stick out as the most memorable part of this experience for me.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: It will be worth remembering only if Jordan proves to be worthy of the trouble: Can he help lead his team to the NBA Finals? If so, then we’re all going to be looking back on the Clippers’ principals pulling tighter together around Jordan at his house last night, with the focus being on Chris Paul’s emotional plea to his teammate. But if they’re unable to rally, then this little plot twist will have no staying power (apart from possibly leading the NBA to change the timing of the moratorium).

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogSomeone on Twitter noted that this whole saga was tailor-made for the All Ball blog, and I have to agree. Emojis, Blake Griffin making jokes, Mark Cuban allegedly driving aimlessly around Houston while texting furiously, Paul Pierce tweeting out clip art — it was quite an evening. It was one of the most memorable NBA evenings I can recall that didn’t actually have anything to do with basketball. I love this game.

Blogtable, DeAndre Edition: Impact of his decision on the Clippers?

In this special edition of the Blogtable, we’re asking our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the DeAndre Jordan free-agency saga — and give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Impact on Clippers? | Impact on Mavs? | What you’ll remember most?



VIDEODavid Aldridge breaks down the DeAndre Jordan decision

> What does his return do for the Clippers given their other reported offseason moves? Where do they now rank in the West hierarchy?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: The Clippers avoid a drop in the Western Conference standings with this move – they were looking at retreads or minimum-salary types to man the center spot if Jordan had left. But they’re still not cracking the top three out West – Golden State, San Antonio, Memphis – and to me, it’s the latest example of that franchise’s frantic, emotional, not-quite-professional way of doing things. It doesn’t instill new confidence the Clippers can get through tough postseason times.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: What the Clippers avoided was falling like a piano off a roof. They are in the same place they ranked last season, fighting to be in the upper half of the West bracket, a step below Golden State, San Antonio and OKC, duking it out with Houston and Memphis for home-court advantage in the first round of the playoffs.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Obviously it is a dramatic change. It’s a double blow, keeping the Clippers in a prominent place after all while undercutting the Mavericks’ hopes of being in the upper echelon. We have to see how the rest of the summer turns out rather than give daily updates on where teams rank because the situation is so fluid. A lot of teams are still filling out depth charts. But this minute, the Clippers are behind the lead group of Golden State and San Antonio, part of the pack with OKC, Houston and Memphis in some order.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Obviously this is a game-changer for the Clippers. They went from JaVale McGee to DeAndre. So it’s fair to say they didn’t lose their place in line in the West. That said, the other offseason pieces must deliver in order for the Clippers to go deep into spring. Paul Pierce can’t fall off the cliff just yet. Lance Stephenson must straighten his head and his game in a hurry. And there’s still questions about the depth of the bench especially at point guard.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Clippers avoided wasting, in regard to contending for a championship, a season of Chris Paul and Blake Griffin at their best. They’re still gambling on Lance Stephenson and they still need to hope that their big three stays healthy, because they don’t have anyone to back up any of them right now. But they’ll go into the season as a top-six team in the Western Conference, certainly behind Golden State and San Antonio, and in the mix with Houston, Memphis and Oklahoma City. They can truly contend for a title if coach Doc Rivers can somehow get another reliable contributor with what little flexibility he has left (minimum-contract offers and Jamal Crawford‘s tradeable deal) and if they can improve defensively.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: DeAndre’s return keeps the Clippers firmly entrenched in the upper echelon of the Western Conference standings. They are still a top-four or-five team in the West and one of the best teams in the league. I’m more interested in the impact both Paul Pierce and Lance Stephenson will have on this group, on and off the floor, more than I am DeAndre’s return. The Clippers know what they have in their big man. Those other guys remain a mystery.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe last couple of years have shown how much injuries and other surprises can influence the outcome – the key is to enter next season with a competitive roster and coaching staff, and the Clippers will be right there. They can excel at both ends, their depth has improved and they should be loaded with hungry players, from their Big Three (who collapsed on the verge of the conference finals) to Lance Stephenson (who should be receptive to Doc Rivers’ coaching after a horrible season with Charlotte). I can also envision them adding another player in midseason to add to their run. This was a big summer for the Clippers, and year three with Rivers should be their culmination.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: With Jordan, I’d still have the Clippers third, behind Golden State and San Antonio. Not sure which version of Lance Stephenson they’ll get, but if they get Indiana Pacers Lance instead of Charlotte Hornets Lance, they might be able to leapfrog those teams. Interestingly, I also think the key there is Jordan, and whether he’s able to continue to develop and be more than a 10 ppg scorer and develop into more of an offensive threat. They still need a bench, of course, but that core of CP3, Blake and DeAndre is going to be what makes the Clips a contender.

Blogtable, DeAndre Edition: Impact of his decision on the Mavericks?

In this special edition of the Blogtable, we’re asking our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the DeAndre Jordan free-agency saga — and give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Impact on Clippers? | Impact on Mavs? | What you’ll remember most?



VIDEODirk Nowitzki talks after the Mavs’ postseason ouster

> How does his change of heart affect the Mavericks, their offseason moves and the upcoming season? Where do they now rank in the West hierarchy?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: This is potentially devastating to Dallas, which won 50 games last season and now will be doing well not to lose 50. The options left among available big men are limited – Amar’e Stoudemire‘s name has come up, but he’s strictly a limited-minutes guy at this point, and neither Kevin Seraphin nor Josh Smith is a center, for those suggesting them. Owner Mark Cuban‘s “David Robinson year” remark might actually play out, and that’s tough to imagine for Dirk Nowitzki, coach Rick Carlisle and a few others. I am looking forward, though, to seeing Dallas sign Rick Mahorn and Charles Oakley to 1-day contracts for the first Clippers-Mavericks meeting this season. Just to dish out reminders to Jordan and a couple of his teammate-rescuers that this episode won’t soon be forgotten.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com The Mavericks are burnt toast for the 2015-16 season, another waste of one of Dirk Nowitzki’s last years and that’s the worst part of the flip-flop. Dallas is in the lottery, up to its 10-gallon hat. But I’m going on the record here as saying Mark Cuban will be thankful this happened in a couple of years. While Jordan is worth the price to the Clippers to keep him as the third wheel with Chris Paul and Blake Griffin, he would have been badly exposed as Cuban’s so-called “franchise player” down the line. It was a bad joke to even mention him in the same breath as Shaquille O’Neal. I think Jordan might even have realized that himself and ran from that burden.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: It’s a brutal outcome for the Mavs. It’s not like DeAndre Jordan turned them down and they implemented the fallback plan. By the time he had finished mishandling the situation at historical levels, they were scrambling for the fallback plan to the fallback plan. The Dallas front office began the offseason with a clear plan, executed it with precision… and then got it fell apart through no fault of anyone there. If Wesley Matthews comes back strong, the Mavericks will be around .500, respectable but not in the playoffs. And they will have a lot of people rooting for them.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I think there’s a silver lining to losing DeAndre. I always thought the Mavericks with him were nothing special … maybe a No. 6 or 7 team in the West. This way, they can get a jump on rebuilding and stash their millions for next summer and plan to transition from the Dirk Nowitzki era.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Dallas is where the Clippers were 24 hours ago. They have a strong starting lineup, with a huge hole at center. Unlike the Clippers, they have a lot of cap space. But while there are a lot of centers still available, they’re all back-up quality. So I could see them trading for Chris Andersen or Zaza Pachulia. As they stand, they’re in the 8-10 range in the Western Conference, with the health and recovery of Wes Matthews still being a big question.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: This is the strange part for me — I didn’t think adding DeAndre was a gamechanger for the Mavericks. Sure, he would help shore up the middle. But without an elite point guard feeding him, I don’t know that he would have been a consistent force for the Mavericks on both ends of the floor. The Mavericks certainly don’t have any options comparable to DJ now, and that’s a potentially devastating blow for a franchise that is contemplating the dreaded rebuild. I don’t like the idea of Dirk Nowitzki on a lottery team in his twilight years, but in the absence of some miraculous move between now and training camp, that’s the predicament these guys could be in this season.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The Mavericks are going to miss the playoffs, and they may lose their draft pick to the Celtics (unless it lands among the top seven) by way of the Rondo trade. The silver lining will emerge one year from now if they can turn Jordan’s absence into a superior free agent in 2016. But this interim season is going to be a long one for a team that figures to have no identity at either end of the floor.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog Without DeAndre, I’m not sure that they do rank among the West hierarchy. The Western Conference is so stacked, and if you’re looking for playoff teams that might drop out of the picture to make room for teams like Oklahoma City, Phoenix or Utah, I’d look directly at Portland (after losing LaMarcus Aldridge) and Dallas. Losing Monta Ellis will hurt, and while Wesley Matthews should be a nice addition, he’s still recovering from a torn Achilles. Jordan could have given them a nice frontline alongside Dirk and Chandler Parsons. Now they need Dirk to play like MVP Dirk. And I’m not sure that player still exists.

Morning shootaround — July 9


VIDEO: DeAndre Jordan isn’t going anywhere, Lob City fans

How will DeAndre’s decision affect Mavs? | Report: Matthews sticking with Dallas | Davis officially re-ups with Pelicans | Report: Pistons to keep Anthony | Report: Spurs trade for McCallum

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: How will DeAndre’s decision affect Mavs? — If you were in an NBA cave yesterday, you missed out on the wild, day-long saga free-agent center DeAndre Jordan put everyone through after having a change of heart about his agreed-upon deal with the Dallas Mavericks. Ultimately, after a wooing process that included Jordan’s Los Angeles Clippers teammates Blake Griffin, Chris Paul and others, he did renege on his agreement and returned to Lob City. While that’s all well and good for the Clippers, what does this do to the Mavericks? Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News analyzes it and does not paint a pretty picture:

Even if you have no love for owner Mark Cuban or his team, you have to admit it’s cruel and unusual the way they lost DeAndre Jordan.

The Mavericks are left to wonder what the heck happened and how they can recover from the franchise-shaking blow of losing a 26-year-old rising star center who was one of the most sought-after free agents this summer.

This could be an event that will rank with Roy Tarpley’s drug suspension as the darkest days in franchise history.

It could impact everybody from coach Rick Carlisle to franchise icon Dirk Nowitzki and all in between.

In the short term, the Mavericks have to find somebody to play center and the options are limited. The Indiana Pacers could be willing to listen to trade offers for 7-2 Roy Hibbert, but they already had a tentative deal sending Hibbert to the Los Angeles Lakers. And Hibbert is coming off a lackluster 2014-15 season.

The option exists to make a run at Amar’e Stoudemire, too. The Mavericks suddenly have about $20 million more than they expected to have to fill out their roster.

Players like Washington’s Kevin Seraphin are still on the board. He’s a five-year veteran who is 6-9 and 260 pounds but averaged just 6.6 points and 3.6 rebounds in 15.6 minutes per game this season. Seraphin, 25, is not considered a strong rebounder.

Clearly, the Mavericks are not going to find anybody on the open market that can rival Jordan.

What they also must wonder now is whether or not the upcoming season can be salvaged without a dip into the lottery, which would be a bitter pill to owner Mark Cuban and a dangerous move since the Mavericks’ 2016 first-round draft pick will go to Boston in the Rajon Rondo deal unless it is among the top seven in the lottery.

Last week after getting the original commitment from Jordan, Cuban said that if the Mavericks had lost out on Jordan, they would have been forced to consider the unsavory prospect of tanking a season – “have our David Robinson season,” Cuban called it. It would take a major dive into the lottery, finishing with at least the fourth-worst record in the league, to guarantee the Mavericks wouldn’t lose their pick.

Moreover, the Mavericks could be faced with massive roster turnover again next summer when Chandler Parsons and Dirk both can opt out of the final years of their contracts.

*** (more…)

DeAndre Jordan picks Clippers after all


VIDEO: DeAndre Jordan opts to stay in Los Angeles

Ending — maybe — one of the bizarre moments in league history, DeAndre Jordan on Wednesday reneged on a previous commitment to sign with the Mavericks and chose instead to remain with the Clippers.

The decision not to stick with his original decision casts Jordan in a terrible public light, but apparently is the outcome he wanted after reportedly reaching out to the Clippers to let them know he was interested in staying with the only professional team he has known. That prompted the most high-profile of the Clippers — Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, Doc Rivers — to converge on Jordan’s home in Houston to close the deal.

If the Clippers could not get Jordan to return, it would have faced being a franchise considered to be an annual title contender to becoming a team in the middle of the pack in the ultra competitive Western Conference, especially with the Spurs landing LaMarcus Aldridge and getting David West. Also the Oklahoma City Thunder expect to contend with the healthy return of former MVP Kevin Durant and we can not forget the Clippers’ main rivals, the defending champion Golden State Warriors.

The Mavericks, likewise trying to get an audience, apparently never got inside. The attempt to convince Jordan to stick with his first instinct and join Dallas never happened, until owner Mark Cuban began to inform his front office the new starting center would not be coming after all, according to several reports.

The Mavericks are in the same position the Clippers were in when shopping in the free agent market. The Mavericks lost Tyson Chandler when he agreed to a deal with the Suns. The Mavericks had a backup plan in place if Jordan had turned down the team last week. But those plans may not be an option as the Pacers have a proposed trade of Roy Hibbert to the Lakers.

Wednesday’s turn of events began when a report from ESPN.com’s Marc Stein stated the team would step up its efforts in retaining the center piece of their defense.

On Tuesday, J.J. Reddick was asked to grade his team’s offseason in a radio interview with Bleacher Report Radio on Sirius XM, he didn’t mince words about how he thought the offseason went in Lob City.

"Believe only half of what you see, and nothing that you hear" -Edgar Allan Poe

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