2014 NBA Playoffs

The Finals Stat: Game 5


VIDEO: Spurs’ Third-Quarter Clinic

Game 5 basics
MIA SAS
Pace 92.0 92.0
OffRtg 92.7 115.4
EFG% 44.7% 55.1%
OREB% 12.8% 14.3%
TO Ratio 12.8 8.9
FTA rate 0.360 0.295

SAN ANTONIO — The San Antonio Spurs are NBA champions for the fifth time, having defeated the Miami Heat four games to one in The Finals. One stat stood out from the rest as the Spurs closed it out with a dominant 104-87 victory on Sunday.

The stat

70 – Total point differential of The Finals.

The context

That’s the largest point differential in Finals history, surpassing the Boston Celtics’ plus-63 in the 1965 Finals against the Los Angeles Lakers. The Heat won Game 2 by two points, while the Spurs won Games 1, 3, 4 and 5 by an average of 18.0.

The was a complete destruction of the two-time defending champions. The Spurs’ offense was an efficient machine, scoring 118.5 points per 100 possessions over the five games. They assisted on 66 percent of their field goals and averaged just 11.5 turnovers after committing twice that many (23) in Game 1. They got contributions from everyone in their rotation.

And if you got caught up in the precision ball movement and ridiculous perimeter shooting, you might not have noticed how good their defense was. You don’t beat a team by 70 points over five games with great play on just one end of the floor.

The Heat had the best offense through the first three rounds, scoring 113.7 points per 100 possessions in 15 games, including 114.3 in the conference finals against the No. 1 defense of the regular season. But in The Finals, they scored just 101.3. LeBron James averaged 28.2 points per game in the series, but only 4.0 assists. He didn’t get much help.

It was really on the Heat’s end of the floor where Game 5 changed. Miami had scored 29 points on its first 23 possessions, leading by 16 points midway through the first quarter. But they were then held to just 11 points over their next 26 possessions, as the Spurs took over the game and eventually built a 22-point lead.

For the Heat, it was death by execution.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
EFG% = (FGM + (0.5 * 3PM)) / FGA
OREB% = Percentage of available offensive rebounds obtained
TO Ratio = Turnovers per 100 possessions
FTA Rate = FTA / FGA

GameDay Live: Heat-Spurs Game 5


VIDEO: Kawhi Leonard did it all to pull the Spurs through against the Heat in The Finals

SAN ANTONIO — Fifteen years later, it still has to taste as sweet as the first time for San Antonio Spurs legend Tim Duncan and his coach Gregg Popovich.

Feels like the first time, indeed, even though this makes three titles in three difference decades and five total.

Larry O’Brien never looked so good.

The mighty San Antonio Spurs are your 2014 NBA champions, defeating the Miami Heat in five games and three straight breathtaking performances to dethrone the two-time NBA champs.

They did it on Father’s Day, too, a sweet day for their oldest player and proud father Duncan, the backbone of the franchise, and a bittersweet day for its young star, Kawhi Leonard (the youngest MVP of The Finals since Duncan 15 years ago), whose father was shot and killed at the family car wash in Compton, Calif., back in 2008, just as he was becoming a basketball star.

We can talk about LeBron James and the Miami Heat later, but tonight, it’s all about the “Spurs Way,” the blend of the old (Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili) and new (Kawhi … Patty Mills Boris Diaw and the rest) and one of the league’s true dynasties and the fact that team triumphed over talent when it mattered most.

And yes, they avenged that loss to the Heat in The Finals last year in the best way possible (outscoring the champs by 70 points in the five games and winning every game by 15 or more points), better known as …

#TheSpursWay

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The @officialspurs are the 2014 NBA Champions!!!

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The “Beautiful Brand” wins out

There will be more converts to come, trust me. There will be more!

All respect due …

They do indeed. And they’ll get it around here.

Leonard’s time to shine is now!

You pick up a pen, write Kawhi Leonard’s name and then hand it to someone. Pretty simple.

#SpursWay

All team, all the time!

A timeless tradition … 

Old Man River Walk


VIDEO: Manu with the nasty lefty throwdown over Chris Bosh

Not the “Framily Plan” 

Low blow alert!

Kawhi-V-P 

There is no choice but to give this quiet warrior his due!

(more…)

Heat defense pushes Spurs to pass


VIDEO: GameTime’s crew breaks down the Spurs’ pass-happy offense

SAN ANTONIO — The San Antonio Spurs’ offense has been a thing of beauty all season. But if the ball movement seemed like it reached a new level in Games 3 and 4 of The Finals in Miami … well, it did.

According to SportVU, the Spurs passed the ball 362 times in Game 3 on Tuesday, an average of 4.21 times per possession, their highest mark of the season. And in Game 4 on Thursday, they passed the ball even more, 381 times, or 4.54 times per possession.

This series is a race between the Spurs passes and the Heat’s rotations. And most of the time, it’s been like a race between Usain Bolt and Charles Barkley. Miami’s defense is meant to disrupt the opponent’s offense, but it has essentially pushed the Spurs to do what they do best.

In fact, before Game 3, the Spurs’ highest passes-per-possession mark came on Jan. 26 in … Miami. So the three games that they’ve moved the ball most have been the three games that they’ve played at American Airlines Arena.

Most passes per possession, 2013-14 Spurs

Date Opp. Res. Passes Poss. PPP PTS OffRtg
June 12 @ MIA W 381 84 4.54 107 127.4
June 10 @ MIA W 362 86 4.21 111 129.1
Jan. 26 @ MIA L 381 91 4.19 101 111.0
Jan. 28 @ HOU L 374 90 4.16 90 100.0
May 27 @ OKC L 370 92 4.02 92 100.0
Feb. 12 @ BOS W 364 91 4.00 104 114.3
Mar. 14 vs. LAL W 390 100 3.90 119 119.0
Mar. 24 vs. PHI W 373 96 3.89 113 117.7
Nov. 11 @ PHI W 360 93 3.87 109 117.2
Feb. 18 @ LAC W 381 100 3.81 113 113.0

via SportVU
PPP = Passes per possession
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions

Tony Parker knows that he has to share the ball and trust his teammates more against the Heat than he does against other opponents. And once he gets rid of it, it can be like a hot potato, with Boris Diaw acting as a de facto point guard in the middle of the floor. The more the ball moves (especially from one side of the floor to the other), the more likely it is that the Spurs will get an open shot.

There’s no real correlation between how often the Spurs have passed the ball and how efficiently they’ve scored. Games against the Rockets and Thunder in the above list were pretty poor offensive games by San Antonio’s standards. And they’ve had games where they’ve scored efficiently (like Game 7 vs. Dallas and Game 1 vs. Portland) without moving the ball much (2.86 and 2.78 passes per possession, respectively).

But the Heat seem to bring out the Spurs’ best ball movement. If Miami can’t find a way to slow it down in Game 5 on Sunday (8 p.m. ET, ABC), its season will likely come to an end.

Game 5: Duncan close to one for the thumb

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Tim Duncan talks with Steve Smith about being on the cusp of a fifth title

SAN ANTONIO — The Miami Heat played their two best games of the NBA Finals on the Spurs’ home floor. If not for LeBron James exiting the final minutes of Game 1 with cramps, they might have headed home up 2-0. So much has changed since then. The Spurs embarrassed Miami, not once, but twice, to push the Heat to the brink. Miami’s only hope is to regain their form the last time they were here.

The Basics:

Game 5 tips off Sunday night at 8 p.m. ET on ABC.

Prior to this year’s format change, the Heat would be playing this Game 5 on their home floor, but considering how lousy they played at the American Airlines Arena, they might feel more at home with their backs against the wall on the road.

They have little to fall back on now. Their 13-game streak of winning after losing is history. The last time they lost three in a row came back in the 2011 Finals to the Dallas Mavericks, the team that raised the Larry O’Brien Trophy in the Big Three’s first season together. Could a Spurs victory end that era?

It certainly sounded on Saturday as if a Spurs victory will extend that Big Three’s era at least another season. Tim Duncan, potentially headed for a fifth championship and a Finals MVP at age 38, as well as 36-year-old Manu Ginobili, playing so well this entire postseason, gave no indication on Saturday that they plan to call it a career, in fact just the opposite. Adding to that, coach Gregg Popovich, the NBA’s Coach of the Year, said he has no plan to walk into the sunset just yet. However, there’s still the matter or wrapping up a fourth championship with Duncan, Ginobili and Tony Parker.

The Narrative:

The best player in the world is getting clobbered by criticism and the best team in the NBA the last two seasons is suddenly being downgraded as a group of individuals that don’t play within a team concept. Both accounts are nonsense. Yes, the Heat was built on the backs of superstar talent, but they have always played as a team. James is one of the most unselfish players in the game, often criticized for passing to an open teammate instead of shooting in the final moments. It can’t go both ways.

The fact is the Heat are being beaten by a playing better than they are, by the best passing, most efficient offense the league has seen likely since the 1980s with Magic Johnson‘s Lakers and Larry Bird‘s Celtics. The true weakness at the moment for Miami is that it’s not getting as many solid performances from up and down the roster as are the Spurs. Chris Bosh and Dwayne Wade have struggled in recent games and Miami’s role players aren’t delivering with the juice of Spurs players such as Danny Green, Boris Diaw and Patty Mills. (more…)

LeBron asks ‘Why not us?’

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VIDEO: Media Day: LeBron James

SAN ANTONIO — LeBron James arrived back in San Antonio for a short media session Saturday afternoon in a pleasant mood, low-key and cordial. The Miami Heat’s far-and-away best player in their so-far disappointing NBA Finals didn’t attempt to airbrush the reality of his team’s dire predicament. But neither was he here to concede that their bid for a first three-peat in the NBA since 2002 was DOA.

“You either don’t make the playoffs or you win a championship,” James said. “There’s no in between.  I don’t want no first-round victory, no second-round victory, no Eastern Conference finals. Either I don’t make the playoffs or I would rather get my two months off, get my body rested or win the Finals. I don’t want no in between.”

The odds are heavily stacked against him. No team in league history has recovered from a 3-1 hole in The Finals to win the championship. The Spurs, after they arguably played as near to perfection during Games 3 and 4 in Miami as any team ever, have never lost a 3-1 lead in a playoff series with Gregg Popovich as coach. The Heat, so used to this script being flipped, have never faced such a deficit in the Big Three era.

So when the Heat take the floor at the AT&T Center for Game 5 on Sunday night (8 p.m. ET, ABC), James said his speech to his teammates will urge them to make the impossible possible.

“Why not us? Why not us?” James said. “History is made to be broken, and why not me be a part of it? That would be great. That would be a great story line, right?”

To do actually do it is another story altogether. The Heat will have to figure a way to slow down the Spurs’ hyper-efficient offense and reboot their own offense that has yet to crack 100 points in a single game this series and dropped off a cliff on their home floor.

James, though, is hardly to blame although he shoulders so much of the criticism. His offensive numbers in the series are eye-popping: 27.5 ppg on 60 percent shooting overall and 61 percent from beyond the arc. He’s put up two monster quarters in the last two games, yet neither even fazed the Spurs, who had blown Games 3 and 4 wide open before halftime.

“I’ve been telling myself I need to do more,” James said. “Is it too much to ask myself? I don’t know, I don’t know. I need to do more because what I’m doing isn’t enough. You know, it’s just what I put on myself. If you told me I was averaging 28 [points], shooting 60 percent from the floor and 61 [percent] from the 3-point line and we’d be down 3-1 … ”

“But that’s what the team is all about. It’s team basketball. But I put a lot more [on myself]. Maybe I need to get to 32, and 65 and 65 from the field and 3. It’s just the pressure I put on myself.”

James could go for 60 points Sunday and it might not matter if he doesn’t get more help. Heat point guard Mario Chalmers has had a nightmarish series. The other two members of the Big Three have to re-emerge. Chris Bosh had 21 points in Game 3 and 4 after scoring 18 in each of the first two games. Dwyane Wade, who said Saturday that physically he is fine, was 3-for-13 from the floor in Game 4 and has been burned defensively throughout the series.

To clear his mind, Wade said he headed to the gym by himself Friday night.

“It was just to touch, feel the ball, and wonder why I missed so many floaters. I’m high percentage around the basket, so I don’t like missing those shots,” Wade said. “Just to go in there a little bit and have your moments to yourself. I do it often, especially when I’m ‑‑ offensively when I don’t make the shots I want to make or do the things I want to do.”

James rattled off all the deficits in playoff series past that at one time or another no team had ever conquered — 3-0, 3-1, 2-0, whatever. He recalled the Boston Red Sox becoming the first team to overcome a 3-0 deficit in the American League Championship Series when they beat the New York Yankees.

“So history is made to be broken,” James said.

Maybe he even believes it. He certainly conveyed on Saturday that mentally — now 29 years old, a father and husband off the court and a veteran of today’s relentless, hyper-scrutiny on it — he’s as equipped as ever to overcome what never has before.

“I’m in a good place in my life — it’s basketball,” James said. “I understand it’s the media and the sport is the greatest sport in the world, I love it. It’s done so many great things for me, but it’s just basketball. It’s just basketball. So I let it all go. I give everything to this game. But right after Game 4, I was in the ice tub in the locker room and my two boys come running in there talking about let’s play some more basketball. I was like, ‘If y’all don’t get away from me, it’s the last thing I want to do right now.'”

“But it puts things in perspective, and I’m able to have a clear head about it.”

We’ll see if it’s enough to begin the greatest comeback in NBA Finals history.

Spurs say rematch not about revenge


VIDEO: Gregg Popovich talks about his team’s preparation heading into Game 5

SAN ANTONIO — It’s been a long year since those 28 seconds slipped from their grasp like Waterford crystal smashing onto a concrete floor.

If that painful experience from Game 6 of the NBA Finals hasn’t lived in the forefront of their everyday existence, neither has it climbed down completely off the backs of the Spurs.

“I don’t know that that’s left any minds,” Spurs general manager R.C. Buford said Saturday, with his team on the cusp of turning the page. “But I don’t think it’s what you or why you do it.

“We try to put our best team together. Those [players] are thrust into their moment more often than we are. But our commitment to this group doesn’t change because of last year. We still have to put the best team can together with them, for them, and then it’s fun to see them play well have success.”

Buford joked about looking down the line to a future when Tim Duncan has stopped playing and coach Gregg Popovich has followed him out of the locker room.

“We’ve already got Tim’s successor picked out,” Buford said laughing.

“I think we’re always considering it. I don’t know that you’ll know what the opportunity is. Hopefully you’ve built your program to be as flexible as it can be at the time that opportunities are created.

“I can’t predict when that will happen and know when one of the great players of all time and one of the great coaches of all time leave, not knowing how you’re gonna fill those shoes.”

It was suggested that it will feel strange one day walking through the door of the Spurs’ training facility knowing that Duncan and Popovich are not inside.

“Who says I’ll be walking in?” Buford cracked. “There have been worse ideas.

“It will be numbing, changing. Those are the people you worked with, battled with, committed ourselves to as they’ve committed themselves to the rest of us. That will be hard. I don’t know why we’re talking about this.”

The NBA Draft came just five days after the Heat closed out the Spurs’ miserably lost opportunity in Game 7 last June. Then free agency began on July 1, followed by summer league. There were plenty of times to look back and feel the pain, just not right away.

“We’re still in a mourning period,” Buford said. “It’s not any time that begins and ends.”

It could end as soon as Sunday with the Spurs taking a 3-1 lead into Game 5 at the AT&T Center.

The Spurs insist that their motivation every moment of this season has not been about seeking vengeance from the Heat.

“In my case, not that much,” Manu Ginobili said. “I face every season the same way. If we win it. If we lost it. If we lose in the first round. I love doing what we do. You do love it more if you do well and you win. So in my situation I didn’t really take this season thinking that we have revenge because we lost. I just played the same way.”

It was, according to Duncan, one more lesson.

“I think we go back to last year and we learn from that,” he said. “We’re 30 seconds away. We feel that we have it in the bag and it slips out of our fingers.

“So I think we learn from that and we draw on that and we say, hey, it’s not over till it’s over. Our goal right now is to just win one more game. We’d love to do it [Sunday]. We’d love to do it in one game. But luckily we’ve put ourselves in a situation where we have a couple opportunities and we’re going to take whatever it takes.”

Duncan, Ginobili not looking at exit


VIDEO: Duncan talks about his future, closing out the Heat

SAN ANTONIO — Maybe it’s human nature. We like to write endings to other people’s stories.

But just because it might fit into a neat narrative, don’t think that the chance to raise another NBA championship trophy over their heads sometime in the next week should automatically mean Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili will walk out the door and bring an end to the era of the Spurs’ Big Three.

“I don’t have any plans on doing anything,” the 38-year-old Duncan said Saturday. “I’m going to figure it out when it comes. I’m not saying I’m retiring. I’m not saying I’m not retiring. I’m not saying anything. I’m going to figure it out as it goes. I’ve always said if I feel like I’m effective, if I feel like I can contribute, I’ll continue to play. Right now I feel that way, so we’ll see what happens.

Duncan, who is finishing his 17th NBA season, just passed Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and has now played more playoff minutes (8.869) than any player in history. His 10 points and 11 rebounds in Game 4 of The Finals also moved him ahead of Magic Johnson with 158 double-doubles for the postseason record.

“I don’t have a time frame,” Duncan said. “I don’t think about it. Whatever people are saying or who has insight on whatever, they’re getting it from somewhere else because I haven’t told anybody anything nor have I thought about it in any respect.”

Ginobili dismissed the rumor out of hand.

“You have no data to support that,” he said. “You haven’t talked to any of us to support that. It’s just irrelevant. At this point we are focused on the next game.”

Their 32-year-old partner Tony Parker said he has had no indication that the gang is on verge of breaking up and that he’s looking forward to being on the court with Duncan again next season.

“I know he’s got one more year on his contract, and he loves being with us, loves playing basketball,” Parker said. “Either way, whatever he decides, I’ll support him. But if I have to choose, obviously, I would love him to keep going. I love playing with him.”

For what it’s worth, coach Gregg Popovich has said that he expects Duncan will one day just decide the game is no longer fun and then — “probably in the third quarter of game” — will just walk off the court. Popovich said he’d be “10 minutes behind” Duncan.

But the only coach that Duncan has ever had in the NBA did not sound like he was expecting it all to end, no matter what the outcome of The Finals.

“I don’t feel tired,” Popovich said. “I mean, I’m tired today, but I mean in general. I’d like to continue to coach.”

Beyond this year?

“Sure,” he said. “I didn’t think I was going to have to answer those kind of questions today.”

The questions have been swirling for at least five years as the outside world mistakenly viewed the Spurs’ time as past.

“We’ve been on our last run for the last five or six years from how everyone wants to put it,” Duncan said. “We show up every year, and we try to put together the best teams and the best runs possible because what people say doesn’t matter to us.

“As I said, as long as we feel we’re being effective, we’re going to stay out here and we’re going to play. We feel like we can be effective, and we have been.

“With the front office putting the teams together that we’ve had and us playing smaller roles and our roles changing over the years, and us happy to accept the roles that we’re in, I feel we can do it until we feel we don’t want to do it anymore.”


VIDEO: Popovich addresses the media before Sunday’s Game 5

Beasley says season in the background has changed him for the better

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com

Indiana Pacers v Miami Heat - Game 6

Michael Beasley has yet to be active in The Finals and has been inactive in 10 of Miami’s 19 playoff games. (NBAE via Getty Images)

SAN ANTONIO — The Miami Heat’s main characters had taken their spots for media day at AT&T Center on the eve of the NBA Finals. Stars LeBron James and Dwyane Wade entertained in the interview room. Chris Bosh, Ray Allen, Mario Chalmers and other key cogs answered questions from behind podiums spaced around the perimeter of the floor.

Then there were the others, plopped down in the front row of seats along the corner of the court, just outside the sphere of the media’s interest. It was a fitting foursome: Greg Oden then Chris “Birdman” Andersen then Rashard Lewis then Michael Beasley. All four had signed with Miami within the last two seasons, eager to join LeBron and D-Wade for a championship ride, but also to seek a resurrection of sorts for careers that veered in different directions for differing reasons.

Only Beasley, the troubled, 25-year-old forward, sought something deeper: Salvation.

“I’ve seen him grow immensely, maturity‑wise, as a pro, on and off the court,” said Erik Spoelstra, the Heat’s rookie coach in 2008 when they drafted the 19-year-old Beasley No. 2 overall. “It’s really been ‑‑ it’s been cool to see.”

Even so, if judging solely by how Spoelstra has used him, it’s fair to wonder if Beasley, his disappointing career already dwindling by a thread, has failed in his pursuit. Some may have even forgotten he plays for the Heat. Few players are perceived so negatively by fans and media alike, with much of the scrutiny coming by way of his own missteps; a self-destructive path of poor decisions off the court and a sliding, seemingly increasingly lazy effort on it through his first five seasons spent with three teams.

Yet despite never realizing a rotation niche this season, and being inactive more often than not during the postseason, Beasley is adamant that this second stint with Miami has served as a vessel for personal growth.

“I’ve learned a lot, not just from LeBron and Dwyane, but from Rashard, Udonis [Haslem], Birdman and Ray, a team full of veterans, a team full of future Hall of Famers,” Beasley told NBA.com from his front-row seat little more than a week ago. “Definitely a great move for my career, more on the mental side of things. I’ve learned a lot: How to do things the right way, how to have fun the right way, not to sweat the small stuff.

“I’ve worked. The thing I’ve learned above all else is how to win, what it takes to win, the attitude and dedication to work. You get tired, but once you get used to it, it’s like your body needs it.”

Those are words that might pique the interest of skeptical general managers as Beasley becomes an unrestricted free agent next month. Last summer, after an underwhelming first season in Phoenix, the Suns bought him out of his remaining two years and $12 million as legal issues swirled around him. It followed a flame-out with Minnesota, the team Miami traded him to for a couple of second-round picks two seasons after drafting him one spot behind Chicago’s Derrick Rose and ahead of Russell Westbrook and Kevin Love.

After the Suns cut ties, Beasley signed a one-year, veteran’s minimum contract with the two-time champion Heat, a team with established leaders and where Beasley believed he would be afforded the chance to reset his career, and his life, while removed from the daily pressures of the spotlight.

“Who doesn’t have a past? Who doesn’t have skeletons?” Beasley said. “It’s just my skeletons are in the open, not in the closet. So have I been unfairly portrayed? I can say yes, I can say no. Did I bring it on myself? Most definitely. But it’s the growing process in life, maturing, a grown boy turning into a young man.”

Beasley has yet to be active in The Finals and has been inactive in 10 of Miami’s 19 playoff games. He’s played a total of seven minutes in three games. During the regular season, he appeared in a career-low 55 games and averaged career-lows in points (7.9), rebounds (3.1) and minutes (15.1).

Yet, Beasley said: “Honestly, this season has flown by faster than any other I’ve been in. I don’t know why, I don’t know how. I guess time really does fly when you’re having fun.”

The Heat had no fun in Games 3 and 4 in Miami and now head back to San Antonio for Sunday’s Game 5 in the unenviable position of trailing 3-1. After Game 4, Spoelstra was asked if Beasley could be an option in Game 5 to provide some much-needed scoring punch. While his playing time was sporadic, Beasley did record a career-high shooting percentage of 49.9 percent and 38.9 percent from beyond the arc, a better mark than only his rookie season.

Spoelstra didn’t give a direct answer, and in an indication as to how Beasley is still perceived, the questioner was roasted on Twitter by fans and also media covering The Finals for having even broached the subject.

“I shouldn’t say no. I do, but I’m not going to stress over it,” Beasley said when asked if he cares more now how others view him. “People who know me, my family, my kids, my closest friends, they know me. I’m not trying to get everybody to know that I’m a good guy, a great guy or whatever. At this point I’m just focused on playing basketball.”

Beasley has worked closely with Heat assistant coach Juwan Howard. Unlike past seasons, Beasley is said to arrive early for practice and stays late, cues he said he immediately gleaned from the team’s veterans. He is said to listen intently to coaches and teammates, and he hasn’t uttered a peep about being limited to an end-of-bench role.

He even pays more attention to nutrition when in the past a pregame meal of chicken strips and french fries from the concession stand would do.

“Everything that we’ve discussed privately, everything that we’ve been working on individually and also with other coaches, he’s been grasping it, and he’s been enjoying it and working hard at it,” Howard said. “That right there, that’s how I judge Michael.”

After he signed with the Heat, Beasley hired a new agent. Beasley said he is solely focused on finishing out this season and declined to answer if he’d be willing to sign a deal similar to his current one to remain with the Heat. His agent, Jared Karnes, said there have been no discussions yet with Miami president Pat Riley.

Beasley did make one declarative statement: He will be sticking around in the NBA.

“Definitely,” Beasley said. “There’s still some immaturity about me, but that’s what keeps it light. I’m a goofy, fun-loving guy, I like to think so myself anyway. But you’re definitely going to see a different me.”

It’s up to Beasley to make believers.

Film Study: Spurs on a string


VIDEO: Through the Lens: Finals Game 4

MIAMI — The 2014 Finals have turned into a thorough beatdown. The Miami Heat have won a game by two points, while the San Antonio Spurs have won games by 15, 19 and 21.

They got help from LeBron James‘ cramps in Game 1 and had a flukey shooting performance in Game 3, but were still the better team through the first 144 minutes. And Game 4 was their most complete performance yet.

Except for a couple of ugly quarters, the Spurs’ offense has been humming all series. On Thursday, they were just as good on defense.

James scored 28 points in Game 4, but 19 of those came in the second half, when the Spurs had the game well in hand. They held the Heat to just 36 points on 43 possessions in the first half and basically shut down James’ supporting cast … until James Jones hit four straight shots in garbage time. It was Miami’s worst offensive game of the postseason.

The Heat are the best finishing team in the league. In the regular season, they led the league by shooting 68.0 percent in the restricted area. Through the first three rounds, they were shooting even better than that at the basket and they were solid in the paint through the first three games of The Finals.

But in the first half on Thursday, the Heat had almost as many turnovers (7) as points in the paint (8), where they shot a miserable 4-for-15.

On a string from the start

The first possession of the game foreshadowed exactly what was to come for the next 48 minutes. It was five guys on a string helping each other, closing off the paint, recovering out to the perimeter, keeping the Heat from getting an open shot, and, eventually, forcing a turnover.

The possession started with a Mario Chalmers/LeBron James side pick-and-roll, with Kawhi Leonard sitting back at the foul line, where he can help on Chalmers, but also get back to James. Every other Spur was ready to help…

20140613_poss1_1

After Chalmers swung the ball to Dwyane Wade, he got a sideline screen from Rashard Lewis, and there was Tim Duncan, at the block, cutting off the paint…

20140613_poss1_2

Wade squeezed by Duncan under the basket, but had no shot on the other side of the rim, because Leonard sunk down to prevent it…

20140613_poss1_3

When Wade kicked the ball out to James, Boris Diaw rotated out from the corner. James saw it coming and immediately got the ball to Chris Bosh, but there was Leonard again, closing out…

20140613_poss1_5

Bosh attacked the close out and got by Leonard, and there was Duncan again…

20140613_poss1_6

And when Bosh tried to slip a pocket pass to Wade, Leonard had recovered and got his big mitts on the ball.

It was a supreme effort by Leonard, who was all over the place over a span of 15 seconds. But it was also an example of perfect synergy from all five Spurs. There was no miscommunication and no hesitation in their rotations. When one guy got beat, another guy stepped up and everyone else reacted quickly and appropriately. (more…)

Game 4: The Wrap


From NBA.com staff reports

Kawhi Leonard and the San Antonio Spurs dominated the Miami Heat for a second-straight game to win 107-86 on Thursday night. The Spurs now lead The Finals 3-1 as they head back to San Antonio for a potential closeout game on Sunday. Here’s a quick recap of NBA.com’s complete Game 4 coverage:

Game 4 Coverage: Spurs 107, Heat 86NBA Finals

Analysis

NBA TV: GameTime

Video Highlights

Postgame News Conferences

Photos

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