Morning shootaround — May 30




VIDEO: NBA TV analysts discuss Scott Skiles return to Orlando

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Wade could test Heat | Hoiberg on tap | Skiles returns to Orlando | Harden wants help | Irving welcomes rest

No. 1: Wade could force Riley’s hand — What price loyalty? Over the years while team president Pat Riley has shuffled the roster to keep the Heat in the championship mix, franchise player Dwyane Wade has frequently made financial sacrifices to make it all work. He gave up money to get LeBron James and Chris Bosh to Miami. He took a shorter deal last summer after James left and the team gave Bosh a big, long-term deal. Now it could be time for Wade to expect his payoff and Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel says it could prove a challenge to Riley:

Amid the uncertainty of the team’s roster situation last June, Wade opted out of the final two years that was left on that contract. Then, once LeBron James elected to return to the Cleveland Cavaliers in free agency, Wade re-upped with the Heat on a two-year, $31 million deal that included a $16 million salary for 2015-16 at his option. That contract left more than $10 million on the table from what he otherwise would have collected by not opting out last June.

At the same time, Heat center Chris Bosh, who also is represented by Thomas, secured a maximum free-agent offer from the Houston Rockets, which then led to Bosh agreeing to a five-year, $118 million package with the Heat that began this past season.

Now, with James playing for a championship in Cleveland, it appears Wade might be seeking the type of significant deal he did not secure last summer.

“Several guys opted out of their contract last year,” Thomas said. “Obviously Dwyane wasn’t in a position that Chris was in, in terms of having another team offer a maximum deal. But the reality of this is he’s played his entire career for Miami. He’s done wonderful things in terms of the five titles that they played for, winning three of them.

“He’s had a tremendous career, and we’re just trying to see whether or not there’s room to continue that.”

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No. 2: Bulls ready to make Hoiberg coach — In a city known for plenty of political secrets and more than its share of back room dealing, nobody is surprised that the Bulls have Fred Hoiberg lined up to the be their next head coach, replacing the fired Tom Thibodeau. Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun Times says its only a matter of Hoiberg making things official:

“It’s just when Fred [Hoiberg] says yes to them, not if,’’ the source said. “This is a year in the works.’’

Coaches – both college and at the NBA level – are actually very much dialed into one another, and there weren’t many in either profession that didn’t feel like the Bulls and Hoiberg would be a match “sooner than later.’’

With the NBA Finals between Cleveland and Golden State set to start on Thursday, the Bulls could have the Hoiberg matter signed, sealed and delivered before then.

The only possible hiccup out there seems to be the Minnesota Timberwolves, who also covet Hoiberg. Hoiberg played for the Timberwolves from 2003-05, and then was an assistant general manager for the franchise, seemingly on the fast track to become the general manager. When that never materialized, he went into coaching prior to the 2010 season, and has turned Iowa State into a prominent NCAA program.

According to sources, he’s actually been on the Bulls’ radar since late last year as a Plan B, and as the relationship between now former coach Tom Thibodeau and the front office disintegrated as the year has gone on, he was Plan A with no realistic options following him.

That’s what made the press conference with VP of basketball operations John Paxson and general manager Gar Forman such good theater on Thursday, as the two had to do their best to act like it will be a vast coaching search.

“We’ve got certain criteria that we’re going to be looking for in the next coach,’’ Forman said. “But we’re not going to put ourselves in a box – ‘had to be a head coach, had to be an assistant coach, what level they’ve coached on’ – we’re really going to look for the right fit.

“And I went through some of those things that I’ve talked about. Obviously someone that can lead, but we’ve got to get somebody that can communicate at a high level, that’s got great knowledge of the game, obviously experience is a plus, as far as coaching is concerned. If they’ve been a head coach even more so, but we’re not going to limit our search in any way.’’

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No. 3: Skiles hopes to make more Magic in Orlando — It took Scott Skiles and Magic president Alex Martins some time to make sure they were getting back together for all the right reasons, but the former point guard made his return to Orlando official and now he picks up the rebuilding process, says Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel:

In reality, however, the Magic first had to overcome a significant obstacle, a hurdle in Skiles’ mind.

“I wanted to make sure I was being hired because they thought I could coach, not because I was someone that was affiliated with the organization in the past,” Skiles said.

That concern, Skiles explained, started to fade away once he and the team’s general manager, Rob Hennigan, held a seven-hour talk in Skiles’ suburban Orlando home in recent weeks.

“The first conversation I had with him, I made it very clear that our first priority was to get to know each other on a personal level,” Hennigan said. “The conversation really sort of cascaded from there. I didn’t bring up one time that it was a bonus that he played here or has familiarity with the area and the fan base. That was truly just gravy.”

Throughout a press conference late Friday afternoon, Hennigan and Martins sought to combat the widespread perception that the team hired Skiles because of his past ties to the franchise.

Martins said Hennigan provided him with a list of potential hires shortly after the season ended, and Hennigan started to go through each name one-by-one. When Hennigan arrived at Skiles’ name and started to speak, Martins stopped Hennigan and told him that Hennigan had to arrive at his own conclusions.

Martins added that he spoke with Skiles just twice between the end of the regular season and Friday. The first time lasted just several minutes and was meant to inform Skiles that Hennigan would be in contact. The second time occurred Thursday, when Skiles, Martins and Hennigan traveled to Grand Rapids, Mich., to speak with the DeVos family.

“I truly wanted this to be an objective decision about his coaching ability,” Martins said Friday. “I didn’t want my personal past with Scott and my experience with him of having been a player here and our relationship to enter into that. We truly had to find the right coach for this team.”

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No. 4: Harden would welcome playmaker — One look at a worn-away, worn-down, worn-out James Harden at the end of the Western Conference finals was all that was needed to tell you that the MVP candidate could not be expected to carry so much of the load if he is going to carry the Rockets to their goal of winning a championship. At the team’s exit interviews on Friday, Harden confirmed that he would welcome the offseason acquisition of a playmaking point guard so the Rockets can take the next step forward. Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle has the details:

He said he “definitely” would like to see the Rockets add another playmaker to take some of that responsibility out of his hands.
“That’s one of the conversations me and Daryl are going to have (and) the coaches,” Harden said. “That’s one of the pieces to add, but that’s later conversations. We’ll be all right. We’re very confident in the group we have. This summer we have to work hard and be ready for next year.”

Still, Harden said the Rockets could benefit from keeping more of their core together. Of the 15 players on the Rockets final 2013-14 roster, seven were gone by the start of the next season. Just five players on roster that faced the Trail Blazers were around by the start of this season’s playoffs.

He called keeping the Rockets’ nucleus together “very important” and spoke of the benefits of growing together.

“If we get Pat (Beverley) and D-Mo (Donatas Motiejunas) back healthy, we’re a really good team, a really deep team,” Harden said.

“We’re pretty good with what we have, maybe add a piece or so. But we made it this far with a couple of our guys injured and banged up. Put those guys together and we’ll be a lot better.”

Harden said he intends to work on his “entire game,” and cited “different aspects of shooting, coming off pin-downs, my ball-handling, not turning the basketball over so much.  Post-up game.”

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No. 5: Break before Finals suits Irving — The rest of basketball world may not be happy with more than a week break before the start of the NBA Finals. But Cavs mending point guard Kyrie Irving says the break before taking on the Warriors is just what the doctor ordered, according to our own Steve Aschburner:

“I’m participating in everything,” Irving said after the Cavaliers’ workout Friday. “We just had a light practice today. The next few days, we’ll definitely ramp it up, I assume. I’m in everything. So I’m ready to go.”

That’s a departure from the previous three rounds. Irving sprained his right foot early in the first round against Boston, which, as he continued to play on it, led to a compensating injury in his left knee. That tendinitis limited him against Chicago and caused him to skip Games 2 and 3 against Atlanta in the East finals.

The three-time All Star, 23, did at least travel with the Cavs to Atlanta to start the series, then took a side trip to Florida with Cleveland team physician Dr. Richard Parker to consult with noted sports orthopedist Dr. James Andrews. They came back with a tweaked treatment plan, which Irving credited for helping him play in the Game 4 clincher Tuesday. He scored 16 points in 22 minutes in the 30-point blowout.

Irving’s production hasn’t dropped off entirely, even though he has lacked his signature turbocharged quickness, along with the trust in his body. In 12 games, he has averaged 18.7 points, 3.3 rebounds and 3.7 assists, and his player-efficiency rating of 20.3 is within his PER range of 20.1 to 21.5 through his first four NBA seasons.

But going through the “will he or won’t he?” uncertainty with the knee (the foot isn’t much of an issue anymore) took a mental toll on Irving. So did the layers of treatment, even as he was trying to properly prepare in case he did play.

“You know, being hurt sucks. Especially in a time like that,” Irving said. “So it was just a learning experience, to say the least. But it was a test of my will. I was very resilient in what I was doing. Hopefully going forward I don’t have any relapse.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Klay Thompson could miss at least several days of practice before The Finals after diagnosis of a concussion….Dwight Howard will miss the 2015-16 season opener after getting upgraded to a flagrant foul in the Western Conference finals closer…Warriors Bogut says Dwight Howard crosses the line with physical play…Alvin Gentry is the first candidate to get a second interview with the Pelicans…Wes Matthews leaves the door open in Portland….Thabo Sefolosha says New York police have damaged his reputation

Orlando hires original-Magic player Skiles as coach

HANG TIME BIG CITY – The Orlando Magic are going back for the future.

The Magic announced today that they hired former Magic point guard Scott Skiles as their next coach, replacing interim coach James Borrego, who himself replaced fired coach Jacque Vaughn.

According to a release from the Magic, Skiles’ history developing young players was a major factor in his landing the Magic job.

“Scott clearly distinguished himself as a tremendous fit,” Magic GM Rob Hennigan said. “Our young roster will benefit greatly from Scott’s extensive head coaching experience and commitment to teaching smart, physical, unselfish basketball. We believe in Scott’s ability to establish a culture of winning habits and accountability that will help guide our team in a positive direction.”

“As we began our search, our internal discussions centered on finding a head coach with a solid resume of NBA head coaching experience, great leadership qualities, a motivating communication style, and someone with a strong strategic acumen,” Magic CEO Alex Martins said. “We feel Scott brings a balanced approach in all those qualities and we look forward, with great confidence, to him leading our young men in helping us reach our collective goal of sustainable success.”

As 13 seasons as a head coach with the Suns, Bulls and Bucks, Skiles has accumulated a NBA regular-season record of 443-433 (.506), along with six playoff appearances. The same qualities that made Skiles effective as a player have marked his tenures on the sideline: a fiery demeanor, a relentless work ethic. But Skiles’ intensity has also been his gift and his curse – at each stop along the way, his terms have left some in the organizations looking for a breath of fresh air.

In Orlando, Skiles will have one of the NBA’s youngest rosters to mold. Orlando’s dynamic backcourt of Elfrid Payton and Victor Oladipo appears set for years to come, and restricted free agent forward Tobias Harris should be a hot property this summer, although the Magic have plenty of cap room to keep him. Productive big man Nikola Vucevic agreed to a long-term extension, and the Magic also hold the fifth pick in the 2015 Draft.

Skiles helped the Orlando Magic get off the ground in 1989 as their point guard, playing for the Magic for five seasons. Now, as the twelfth head coach in franchise history, Skiles has the chance to mold this group into the kind of teams he’s built at his previous stops – gritty and gutty, and focused on defense.

The rebuilding effort in Orlando has taken a few years to find its footing and get off the ground, but they’re moving in the right direction. Now it’s up to Skiles to push them into a perennial playoff team.

Warriors’ Thompson out indefinitely


VIDEO: Klay Thompson takes hit to the head

OAKLAND — Warriors guard Klay Thompson is out indefinitely after being diagnosed with a concussion suffered in Game 5 against the Rockets on Wednesday. The surprising update raises the possibility of Thompson at least missing several days of practice before The Finals against the Cavaliers open Thursday at Oracle Arena.

There is no timetable for his return. While the injury generally does not linger as long as a week, each case is different and Thompson will go several days at the minimum without practicing with the Warriors, a potential problem for his conditioning and rhythm.

But, coach Steve Kerr said, “I think with Klay, probably not as much with some guys, Klay picks up his rhythm very quickly. We’re going to practice tomorrow, we’ll have Sunday off and so he’ll have the next couple of days and we’ll re-evaluate. This break has turned out to be good for us, obviously, and maybe good for Cleveland too because they’ve got some injuries. It’s just something we’ve got to work through and we’ll see how it goes.”

Thompson attended practice Friday but was not available for comment.

He was injured after taking a knee to the head from Houston’s Trevor Ariza when Ariza jumped to make a play on defense. Thompson went to the locker room, was examined by doctors and then cleared to return, only to have the Warriors later release a statement saying, “After the game he began to not feel well and developed concussion-like symptoms.”

The Warriors were off the next day, Thursday. On Friday, Thompson has been sidelined.

“Following extensive examinations over the last two days — including neurological tests earlier this morning — Warriors guard Klay Thompson had been diagnosed with a concussion,” the Friday statement said. “He will not return to the court until he is symptom-free and cleared under the NBA’s concussion protocol guidelines. He will be evaluated daily and there is not timetable for his return.”

To be cleared to return, Thompson must go through several steps of increasing exertion — from a stationary bike, to jogging, to agility work, to non-contact team drills — without any setbacks. When Thompson completes those steps, a Warriors doctor will talk with the head of the league’s concussion program, Dr. Jeffrey Kutcher, for final approval for Thompson to rejoin the team.

 

For Irving, down time before Finals just what doctor ordered


VIDEO: Kyrie Irving from practice May 29

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio – Tough as the gap between the NBA’s conference championships and the Finals might be for fans and TV viewers, the first three of these eight days have been a tonic and a balm to Kyrie Irving‘s achy left knee.

That gives the Cleveland Cavaliers point guard a legitimate shot at being healthy when his team faces the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 next Thursday in Oakland.

“I’m participating in everything,” Irving said after the Cavaliers’ workout Friday. “We just had a light practice today. The next few days, we’ll definitely ramp it up, I assume. I’m in everything. So I’m ready to go.”

That’s a departure from the previous three rounds. Irving sprained his right foot early in the first round against Boston, which, as he continued to play on it, led to a compensating injury in his left knee. That tendinitis limited him against Chicago and caused him to skip Games 2 and 3 against Atlanta in the East finals.

The three-time All Star, 23, did at least travel with the Cavs to Atlanta to start the series, then took a side trip to Florida with Cleveland team physician Dr. Richard Parker to consult with noted sports orthopedist Dr. James Andrews. They came back with a tweaked treatment plan, which Irving credited for helping him play in the Game 4 clincher Tuesday. He scored 16 points in 22 minutes in the 30-point blowout.

Irving’s production hasn’t dropped off entirely, even though he has lacked his signature turbocharged quickness, along with the trust in his body. In 12 games, he has averaged 18.7 points, 3.3 rebounds and 3.7 assists, and his player-efficiency rating of 20.3 is within his PER range of 20.1 to 21.5 through his first four NBA seasons.

But going through the “will he or won’t he?” uncertainty with the knee (the foot isn’t much of an issue anymore) took a mental toll on Irving. So did the layers of treatment, even as he was trying to properly prepare in case he did play.

“You know, being hurt sucks. Especially in a time like that,” Irving said. “So it was just a learning experience, to say the least. But it was a test of my will. I was very resilient in what I was doing. Hopefully going forward I don’t have any relapse.”

With Kevin Love (shoulder surgery) already out since the first round, the Cavaliers need Irving to bring as much of his “A” game as possible to prevent Golden State from loading up defensively on LeBron James. There would be a benefit for the whole Cleveland team if it didn’t have to sweat Irving’s status day to day through the Finals.

“More so for him, to be able to get out there and be comfortable,” Cavs coach David Blatt said. “Not have to worry. ‘Am I going to hurt today? Is it gonna get worse if I play? Is it going to bother me from doing the things I normally do at both ends of the court?’ So I’m hoping, more than anything else, for him, that his feeling is such that he can get out there and play without worry. Without concern. Then he’ll be fine.”

It would mean the difference between playing self-consciously and even cautiously versus just playing. The latter can lead to dynamite results, with Irving so key to slowing Golden State’s momentum and breaking down its defense.

“Basketball for me is all based off instincts,” Irving said. “Going out there when you’re playing hurt, it’s a mental struggle and a mental game that you’re playing with yourself. You’re trying to convince yourself, like, ‘I can one-dribble pull-up or come off this screen…’ Your mind is thinking one thing and your body just won’t allow you to do it.

“Knowing when they’re in line, it’s the utmost confidence. For me it’s the biggest thing. Because my game is predicated on stopping and going, and being able to finish at the rim and make plays. … Now these practice days are vital for me in order to get my rhythm back.

“I’m in a good spot right now.”

Numbers preview: The Finals


VIDEO: The Starters preview The Finals

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers each made history in reaching The Finals.

Since the NBA starting counting turnovers in 1977, no team had made The Finals after leading the league in pace — like the Warriors did — or after ranking as low as 20th in defensive efficiency — like the Cavs did — in the regular season. That’s 37 years of trends that have been bucked, in two different ways.

These are special teams. Statistically, the Warriors are the best team we’ve seen since the 1996-97 Chicago Bulls, outscoring their opponents by 11.4 points per 100 possessions in the regular season. The Cavs, meanwhile, have fought through a myriad of changes (via trades and injuries) to get here, improving defensively along the way.

And the Cavs have been statistically better, both offensively and defensively, than the Warriors in the playoffs, even when you account for weaker competition. Cleveland has better marks in adjusted efficiency (taking their opponents’ regular season marks) on both ends of the floor.

This is also a matchup of the MVP and the world’s best player, the two guys who lead the league in postseason usage rate. Stephen Curry and LeBron James won’t be guarding each other and have very unique games, but some of their playoff advanced stats are very similar.

20150529_curry_james

Curry has been the more efficient scorer, while James has provided more for his team on defense and on the glass. Curry has the deeper supporting cast, but James has been here before.

When this series is done, he’ll either be 3-3 or 2-4 in The Finals, and either the Cavs will have their first championship or the Warriors will have their first one in 40 years.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the Finals, with links to let you dive in and explore more.  

Morning shootaround — May 29


VIDEO: Relive the Warriors’ and Cavs’ conference title clinchers

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Breaking down the Thibodeau ouster| Rivers: Paul, Jordan need each other to succeed | Randle aiming for return in Summer League

No. 1: Was Thibodeau enough of a politician?; Clashes with management led to his dismissal— Five seasons, 255 regular-season wins, 23 playoff wins (including an East finals berth) and countless other player-level accolades (developing an MVP, a Defensive Player of the Year and a Most Improved Player) weren’t enough to give Tom Thibodeau job security in Chicago. The Bulls fired Thibodeau yesterday in a not-too-shocking move given the unrest between him and the front office and now, must find his replacement. Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski and our own Steve Aschburner chime in on the move with two different viewpoints.

Here’s Wojnarowski on how Thibodeau’s lack of political glad-handing may have led to his firing:

For all the issues that inspired Chicago Bulls management to carry out such a ferocious campaign to discredit Tom Thibodeau – minutes restrictions and personnel disagreements and an inability to simply interact – perhaps the most powerful had been jealousy.

Over and over, those listening to John Paxson and Gar Forman would tell you that Bulls management could never make peace with the praise heaped upon Thibodeau for 60-victory seasons and deep playoff runs. For them, it was too much about the best defense in the NBA, too much about his development of journeymen into rotation contributors, good players into All-Stars, great players into an MVP.

To them, Thibodeau represented a Chicago folk hero who needed to be leveled. Tell them that he was a great coach, and league officials say you’d often hear back from Bulls management that simply, “He’s good.”

If Thibodeau had only the political savvy to publicly praise his bosses, maybe everyone could’ve been spared the years of needless acrimony and drama. As Thibodeau joined the Chicago Bulls five years ago, a coaching friend told him: “Remember to kiss some babies,” a suggestion that he needed to learn to be more of a politician.

Thibodeau played a part in creating the dysfunction. In his next job, he needs to bring with him some lessons learned, needs to understand better that there can be compromises without destroying your values system.

In the end, management won over owner Jerry Reinsdorf to pay out the $9 million owed on Thibodeau’s contract. Reinsdorf has lorded over decades of management-coaching dysfunction – and yet Thursday he was issuing a statement on the firing of Thibodeau as a way to stay true to the organization’s “culture.” That’s been a screwed-up culture for a long, long time. Between Michael Jordan and Derrick Rose, the Bulls were a mess. When Thibodeau arrived, so did the winning – and then, so did the loathing between management and his staff.

Those close to Thibodeau say that Reinsdorf’s statement stung the coach on Thursday, that he had treasured his relationship with the owner. Thibodeau has always admired Reinsdorf’s accomplishments – a self-made tycoon, a successful sports and media mogul – and always felt that Reinsdorf had been an ally for him. Reinsdorf wasn’t around much, though, and talked far more with management than the coach. Thibodeau lost Reinsdorf in the past year, and ultimately lost the job.

Before the end of Thursday night, Thibodeau had sounded enthusiastic to close associates. He was thinking about the next job, about the possibilities out there. Throughout the day, Thibodeau was getting texts and calls from old players – with the Knicks and Rockets and Celtics and, yes, Bulls – and they say that it moved him.

In the hours after his firing, Tom Thibodeau hadn’t sounded angry to his friends – only nostalgic. Five years is a good run in the NBA; it’s just a matter of time until someone else comes calling for him.

And here’s Aschburner on how Thibodeau’s firing may have come as a result of the years-long feud between he and the front office:

Paxson and Forman spoke with assembled Chicago media for about 25 minutes Thursday afternoon at United Center, by which time Thibodeau had been told his services no longer needed and departed the Advocate Center practice facility across the street. He leaves with two years remaining on his contract, worth a reported $9 million, and the freedom to take a new NBA job (New Orleans remains the source of greatest speculation) or sit out to collect the Bulls’ money, whichever suits him. Paxson and Forman said the Bulls weren’t dragging their heels on Thibodeau’s firing to block him until available coaching vacancies were filled — that makes sense, since whatever he’d earn in 2015-16 would offset what they’d still owe him.

But the way it all was handled — Reinsdorf’s salvos lobbed at the coach in support of his guys in suits, the Bulls’ brain trust being far more available and talkative on Thibodeau’s fate after it had been sealed than while it was salvageable, an apparent Cold War in addressing their communication breakdowns and a sense that egos ruled the day more than the good sense to make things work among proven professionals — fit a little too comfortably into the franchise’s history. Or its vaunted “culture” that got mentioned time and time again Thursday.

Remember former Jerry Krause‘s notorious comment that “organizations win championships?” And the bad blood between Krause and coach Phil Jackson, and Krause and stars Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen? This was that, the same mood, just different principals.

One NBA head coach referred to Friday’s events in Chicago as “a crucifixion.” Another spoke of “the knife Reinsdorf stabbed in Thibodeau’s back” on the way out.

Among the things Thibodeau did in his time with Chicago was help Rose become the league’s youngest MVP, turned Luol Deng into a two-time All-Star, drill Noah into the NBA’s Defensive Player of the Year and a fourth-place finisher in MVP balloting in 2014 and oversee Jimmy Butler‘s development as this season’s Most Improved Player. He got veteran Pau Gasol to perform at a level that made him an All-Star starter for the first time.

Of course, NBA players are survivors, so it’s not surprising that some of them reportedly weren’t happy with Thibodeau, his grinding work demands and what some of them felt was a limited offensive repertoire. Some were said to have complained in exit interviews with Forman and Paxson, and they didn’t exactly throw themselves in front of the divorce train when asked about the “noise” in March and April.

So who might the Bulls’ new boss be? Forman and Paxson made it sound like they were only now about to rev up a full-blown coaching search, which is hard to believe. Iowa State’s Fred Hoiberg, a Forman crony from way back who spent part of his NBA career in Chicago, has been the No. 1 candidate — at least in speculation –since before the season began. The idea that the Bulls would make this leap of cutting loose Thibodeau without having their parachute strapped on, or at least within reach, strains credulity.

Hoiberg is a bright basketball mind, a solid individual and, aside from a health record that required a second open-heart procedure recently, certainly capable of the Xs & Os required in the job. Certainly, he is communicative enough — and clued in enough now — to stroke Bulls upper management in the ways it apparently needs.


VIDEO: K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune analyzes the Thibodeau firing

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Bulls fire Thibodeau

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Chicago Bulls announced Thursday afternoon that they have fired coach Tom Thibodeau.

The rift between Thibodeau and Bulls management — specifically vice president John Paxson and general manager Gar Forman — has never been a secret. In the news release, Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf made it sound like Thibodeau refused to listen to other people in the organization and leaked information about the team’s internal issues.

While the head of each department of the organization must be free to make final decisions regarding his department, there must be free and open interdepartmental discussion and consideration of everyone’s ideas and opinions. These internal discussions must not be considered an invasion of turf, and must remain private.

Thibodeau came to Chicago from Boston, where, as an assistant, he was the architect of one of the best defenses in NBA history. The Bulls had a top-five defense in each of his first four seasons, but fell off on that end of the floor last season.

20150528_bulls

Chicago dealt with major injury issues in each of the last four seasons, starting with Derrick Rose‘s ACL tear in the 2012 playoffs. Thibodeau loaded his best players with heavy minutes at times, and the input that he refused to welcome likely had to do with injury prevention.

Still, he can probably have another job as soon as he wants one. Denver, New Orleans and Orlando are all looking for new coaches and all ranked in the bottom 10 in defensive efficiency last season.

Morning shootaround — May 28


VIDEO: Highlights from Game 5 of the Western Conference finals

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Thompson develops concussion-like symptoms | Reports: Magic, Pelicans interested in Skiles | Report: Bulls mull firing Thibodeau

No. 1: Thompson develops concussion-like symptoms after Game 5 — Golden State Warriors shooting guard Klay Thompson took an accidental knee to the head by Houston’s Trevor Ariza late in Game 5. He suffered a cut, from which blood was coming out of, and had to leave the game, but eventually did return. After the Warriors wrapped up their Finals berth, however, Thompson said he wasn’t feeling well and developed concussion-like symptoms. ESPN.com has more on the story:

Golden State Warriors shooting guard Klay Thompson developed concussion-like symptoms after Wednesday night’s series-clinching Game 5 win over the Houston Rockets, the team announced.

“Klay Thompson was evaluated by the Warriors medical staff immediately after suffering an injury during tonight’s game and was put through a concussion evaluation,” the team said. “At the time he did not show any concussion-like symptoms. After the game he began to not feel well and developed concussion-like symptoms. He will continue to be evaluated by the team’s medical staff tonight.”

Thompson said in a televised postgame interview that he was “feeling a little dizzy,” before adding, “We got a week off — or close to it. I’ll be all right. I’ll get my health back.”

The injury occurred when Ariza, caught in the air on a shot fake, hit the right side of Thompson’s head with his right knee. Ariza was called for a personal foul on the play.

Blood coming out of the cut prevented Thompson from checking back in to the game upon his return to the Warriors’ bench. He ended up needing three stitches to close the wound.

“He was definitely shaken up. We’ll evaluate him tomorrow. It was a bizarre night for him,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said in his postgame news conference before Thompson’s concussion-like symptoms were revealed. “Huge first half that really got us going, and then I left him in too long, he got his fourth foul and I thought I’d buy one possession, see if we could get him a shot, and when he picks up his fifth and when I do bring him back, he immediately gets hurt and out for the rest of the night.

“The break will be good for him. It’ll probably be good for all the guys with the run we’ve been on, but especially for Klay.”

 


VIDEO: Thompson suffers accidental blow to head in Game 5

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Hang Time Podcast (Episode 203) Super Team Redux

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Maybe one superstar, one healthy, game-changing true superstar is all you need.

That one transcendent star might be just enough to get you into the building to compete for the Larry O’Brien Trophy. Or at least that is the story they are telling today in Cleveland, where LeBron James has guided the Cavaliers back to The Finals for the first time since 2007.

He didn’t promise this when he returned home last summer, at least not right away. But the Cavaliers are here now, awaiting either the Golden State Warriors or the Houston Rockets in The Finals next week.

And since we have a few days to ponder it, what does this feat for LeBron say about today’s NBA and what it takes to scale the mountain?

An hobbled Kyrie Irving and an injured Kevin Love should have been a recipe for disaster in the conference semifinals against Chicago. That was not the case. LeBron rendered that point moot with stellar work night after night and did the same against the Atlanta Hawks in the conference finals sweep. Can he do it again? We shall see.

In the meantime, let’s talk about the theory of a Super Team and whether or not that’s what you need to compete for it all, to win it all. Recent history is split on that (LeBron, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh were 2-2 in the big series).

History says there are no guarantees for Super Teams, as our very own Rick Fox would know, having witnessed a Super Team meltdown of his own with the Los Angeles Lakers’ monster squad of Shaquille O’Neal, Kobe Bryant, Karl Malone and Gary Payton — the one coached by the Zen Master himself, Phil Jackson. The same star-studded crew that fell to the ultimate team, the 2004 champion Detroit Pistons.

Mix it up with us on Episode 203 of The Hang Time Podcast: Super Team Redux …

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business, Andrew Merriman.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: LeBron James leads the Cleveland Cavaliers past the Atlanta Hawks and into The Finals for the first time since 2007

Howard, McHale still confused on suspension talk, ready to move on


VIDEO: Should Howard have been suspended?

OAKLAND, Calif — After sweating out the ruling from the NBA office following his Flagrant 1 foul for a backhanded slap at Andrew Bogut on Monday, Rockets center Dwight Howard is just happy that he avoided suspension and will be able to play tonight in Game 5, while his coach Kevin McHale is still trying to sort out the entire punishment system.

“There’s no need to even talk about it even more,” Howard said following the morning shootaround at the Olympic Club. “I’ve got to get ready for tonight’s game. That’s all that really matters.

“We just got to play basketball. I have to understand what another team’s game plan is, especially with me. To try to get me frustrated, get me mentally out of the game. I just stay strong through all that stuff.”

But is that easier said than done?

“It is,” Howard said. “It’s kinda like being in the boxing ring, but you don’t get a chance to use your gloves. You just gotta get hit. It’s tough, but it’s about how you respond.

“Just put my energy in the right place. Instead of fighting back, fighting the other team when they try to frustrate me, fight harder to get an offensive rebound. Fight harder to get post position. Fight harder to get a stop on defense. All that stuff will make up for wasted energy on trying to fight back with another player.”

The former Celtics Hall of Famer McHale, who played in a far rougher, tougher league back in the 1980s, sounded as if his head might explode from trying to understand the current system of penalties.

“Those rules are ridiculous,” he said. “I don’t know who came up with the rules. You should just decide how many flagrants or how many technicals per series is acceptable … one, two, three, nine … I don’t know. Then every series it starts off with zero. Then you have that many in the first series and that many in The Finals.”

What did McHale tell Howard going forward?

“Hit them first,” he said. “They always call the second one.”

McHale laughed at the notion that the incident between Howard and Bogut would be remotely compared to his playing days and said there was a simpler, more direct way to hand things back then.

“Here’s what happened,” McHale said. “If a guy held you, you hit him. Then the referee said, ‘If you don’t want to get hit, don’t hold him.’ Because they usually catch the second one.

“So you blasted him in the head and the referee said, ‘Well, you guys are even, because you held him and then you hit him in the head.’ You look at the guy and say, ‘If you hold me, I’m gonna hit you in the head.’ And then the referee would say, ‘If you hold him, he’s gonna hit you in the head.’ And then they quit holding you and you quit hitting him in the head.

“Oh, I gotta go on that one.”