Who cashed in (and who didn’t) from the 2011 draft?

VIDEO: Klay Thompson extends with the Warriors

The best way to judge a draft is to wait a few years and see who gets paid the most and the quickest. Which means we know a lot more about the first round of the 2011 class, now that the deadline for contract extensions has passed.

And the verdict is … what, exactly?

Only six of the 14 players taken int the lottery beat the deadline and got richer. That means the draft was so-so at best and disappointing at worst. But complicating matters is the smell of big money down the road. Thanks to the new TV deal and the looming labor negotiations in a few years, some players are willing to place bets on themselves and hold out for a few extra dollars. It’s also known as the Kawhi Leonard route. The MVP of the 2014 Finals and 15th overall pick had hoped for a max deal, didn’t get one from the Spurs, and will try the market next summer during restricted free agency.

But he was the big exception, and so, we survey the scene for the first-round winners and losers.

Winners:

Klay Thompson (drafted No. 11): Got four years and $70 million from the Warriors to make a big, umm, splash. At roughly $17 million a season, he hasn’t made an All-Star team, yet he’s earning more than Paul George and Russell Westbrook. If you think that’s an overpay, well, the market, which is about to expand, says otherwise. Warriors didn’t want to chance Thompson going on the market and were very comfortable with his growth so far.

Kyrie Irving (1): The Cavs didn’t waste any time giving him the max this summer, and as a bonus, gave him LeBron James. If he gets a ring next June, then it will have been quite the 12-month stretch.

Kenneth Faried (22): There were six power forwards taken ahead of him, including three in the lottery. But Faried worked his way into a four-year, $50 million deal with rolled-up sleeves. The Nuggets are hoping this deadline deal works better than the one for JaVale McGee.

The Morris Twins (13 and 14): Markieff and Marcus Morris didn’t want to test the market, not necessarily because the money wouldn’t have been better, but because they didn’t want to separate. Unless you were born within minutes of your brother or sister, you wouldn’t understand. So the Suns’ forwards agreed to keep the family together. Markieff gets $32 million and Marcus $20 million. Oh, and they keep their money in the same bank account.

Nik Vucevic (16): It didn’t take long for the Magic to find Dwight Howard‘s replacement. Vucevic still needs to refine his skills but big men with double-double ability averaging 13.6 and 11.5 in two Magic seasons) are hard to come by, and that’s why Orlando forked over $53 million over four years. That’s a good, fair price for a young and developing center.

Kemba Walker (9): A day after agreeing to a four-year, $48 million deal with the Hornets, Walker hit the game-tying and game-winning shots in the home opener. He’s a small, shoot-first point guard but is a straight-up baller who craves big moments. A no-brainer for a team desperate for talent and a turnaround.

Ricky Rubio: He was drafted in 2009 but after two years playing in Spain is technically part of the 2011 rookie crop. After the Wolves lost Kevin Love, there was a concern whether Rubio would want to stick around for what could be a lengthy rebuilding process. Yet from the first day of camp, Rubio said he was excited to start a fresh era in Minnesota. His four year, $56 million deal is essentially Eric Bledsoe money, not bad considering Rubio is still looking for consistency and a stretch of good health.

Chandler Parsons (38) and Isaiah Thomas (60): Yes, they were second-rounders, but when one player gets roughly $16 million a season from Dallas and the last pick of the draft gets $6 million a year, as Thomas did this summer from the Suns, they sound like winners to me.

Losers:

Derrick Williams (2): He’s already on his second team and could fetch a few dollars next summer, but this so-called NBA-ready player from the draft struggles to find a comfort zone between the forward spots. He needs a solid season to decrease his flaws and prove that he can be more than a journeyman in this league. If he can’t do that in Sacramento, you wonder if he can do it anywhere. You only get so many chances before teams simply move on.

Enes Kanter (3): After the Jazz forked over big dollars for Gordon Hayward and Alec Burks, they’re done paying for potential, at least for the moment anyway. Not only is Kanter inconsistent, he’s on a team with Derrick Favors, who got paid a year ago, and Rudy Gobert, whom the Jazz are high on. Kanter looks to be the odd big man out and could be bait at the trade deadline.

Jimmy Butler (30): He and the Bulls were a few million apart at the deadline, and even though Butler could get a decent offer next summer, it might not be from Chicago. The Bulls like his defense, but he lacks what they really could use: outside shooting from the two-guard spot. That’s why they didn’t blow him away at the deadline.

Kings: In addition to delaying Williams, they spent their first-round pick on Jimmer Fredette, who was taken one spot ahead of Thompson. In a weird twist, the Kings, whose brain trust comes from the Warriors, were hoping to steal Thompson next summer.

Wizards: Has anyone seen or heard from Jan Vesely, the No. 6 pick in 2011? There haven’t been many players drafted that high who failed to get a third-year qualifying offer. He’s now playing in Turkey after flaming out quickly with the Wizards, then Nuggets.

Derrick Rose down and out (at least vs. the Cavs)

VIDEO: Derrick Rose leaves game vs. Cavs with an ankle injury.

Derrick Rose limped off the floor again. Stop me if you heard this before. And before.

UPDATED (12:37 a.m.)

At least this time, the left ankle sprain he suffered Friday against the Cavs didn’t appear to be serious, at least not enough to keep him out for an extended time, if any. Rose injured himself after an awkward landing in the second quarter and didn’t return, which cast a spell over what was otherwise an intense and suspenseful game.

Given his injury history — namely a pair of knee injuries that benched him for most of two complete seasons — any time Rose grabs a body part, Chicago winces. That’s why, no matter what degree of injury Rose suffers, it’s a big deal in a town that is weary of watching the Bulls play on without him.

That this happened in the home opener made it even more ominous. At least the Bulls are assured of seeing Rose suit up again, maybe even Saturday in Minnesota. Which is better than the same-old, same-old.

Klay Thompson: Cash Brother


VIDEO: Warriors, Thompson reportedly agree to four-year deal

The Warriors made a bold move to keep their Splashy young backcourt intact by giving Klay Thompson the max just hours before the Friday deadline, which should surprise absolutely no one.

The only suspense was whether Thompson would wait until next summer and follow the same financial strategy as Kawhi Leonard and Greg Monroe, hoping to perhaps cash bigger checks, or take his money now. Once the Warriors decided to max him out, then the issue became moot. Thompson gets $70 million over the next four years (he’ll sign another deal when he’s just 28) and the Warriors get to relax. At least until the bill comes due for Stephen Curry.

Oh, yeah. Remember the guy who’s now the fifth-highest paid player on his team, after David Lee, Andre Iguodala, Andrew Bogut and now Thompson? Curry has 3 years and $34 million left on what has become one of the biggest, if not the biggest, bargains in the NBA. The Warriors were able to get Curry “cheap” two years ago (4 years, $44 million) because they took a risk at the time on his balky ankle. Basically, the Warriors are paying Alec Burks‘ prices for Curry, but don’t cry for him. His deal expires right around the time when the new labor agreement kicks in, which means Curry should ink a deal big enough to feed his family … meaning, his great, great grandchildren.

Anyway, while it’s a steep price for Thompson, who instantly becomes among the highest-paid two-guard in the game, what’s not to like about him? He’s shown steady growth on both ends, isn’t high maintenance, made the World Cup team last summer and if he stays healthy will be around a long time. No player has made more 3-pointers in their first three NBA seasons than Thompson (545), and he’s one of the more underrated defensive guards in the game. This is actually the second time the Warriors demonstrated how much they wanted Thompson. The first came last summer when they refused to include him in any deal for Kevin Love.

Keeping Thompson in the fold, rather than risk losing him next season to perhaps the Kings (not a big risk, but the Rockets said that about Chandler Parsons) means the Warriors can watch the Splash Brothers grow together at least for the next few years. They compliment each other well and are easily the heart of a Warriors team hoping to stamp themselves as contenders. Next up is Draymond Green; the Warriors will try to lock him up next summer, when their payroll will certainly swell towards $90 million.

Report: Warriors, Thompson agree to four-year max extension

By NBA.com staff reports

The Warriors have agreed to terms with Klay Thompson on a four-year maximum extension projected to be in the $70 million range, according to sources.

The 24-year-old shooting guard averaged 18.4 points last season, second on the team to Stephen Curry.

The Warriors had until midnight Friday to reach an agreement with Thompson, who would have become a restricted free agent next summer otherwise.

Report: Jazz, Burks agree to 4-year extension

HANG TIME BIG CITY — With tonight’s midnight deadline looming for teams and players from the 2011 NBA Draft to agree to contract extensions, another player has reached a long-term deal. According to Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski, the Utah Jazz have reached agreement with shooting guard Alec Burks on a 4-year, $42-million extension.

Burks, a 6-6 shooting guard, is entering his fourth season at just 23 years old. Last season, Burks appeared in 78 games and averaged 14 points per game.

Writes Wojnarowski:

Reachable incentive clauses could push Burks’ deal to $45 million, sources said.

Burks has developed into one of the NBA’s better young shooting guards and is a cornerstone of the franchise’s youthful core.

Burks, a member of the 2011 NBA draft class, and his agent, Andy Miller, had until midnight EST on Friday to negotiate an extension with Utah – or Burks could’ve entered into restricted free agency in 2015.

Burks, 23, is the third young Jazz player, along with Gordon Hayward and Derrick Favors, to reach a four-year extension with the franchise.

The Jazz and power forward Enes Kanter ended extension talks Wednesday, and he’ll enter into restricted free agency in July. Utah can match any offer sheet and retain him.

Report: Spurs, Leonard unlikely to reach extension

HANG TIME BIG CITY — NBA teams have until midnight tonight to reach extensions with players drafted in the first round of the 2011 NBA Draft. Some players, such as Charlotte’s Kemba Walker and Denver’s Kenneth Faried, have already agreed to long-term deals with their respective teams. But according to a report this morning, perhaps the most valuable player from the class of 2011 may not reach an agreement in time.

ESPN.com’s Marc Stein reports that NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard and the San Antonio Spurs are unlikely to make a deal before tonight’s deadline:

Sources told ESPN.com this week that Leonard and the San Antonio Spurs, despite more serious discussions between the parties in advance of the Halloween buzzer, are unlikely to come to terms during this extension window, setting up the 23-year-old to become a restricted free agent in July.

‎Negotiations, however, do remain alive going into the final day for at least three other prominent 2011 first-rounders: Golden State’s Klay Thompson, Minnesota’s Ricky Rubio and Cleveland’s Tristan Thompson.

Leonard has been billed as the Spurs’ future face of the franchise for some time — long before he emerged as the star of San Antonio’s five-game destruction of the LeBron James-led Miami Heat in the 2014 NBA Finals — and had his agent, Brian Elfus, in San Antonio this week to negotiate with Spurs officials.

But sources say that San Antonio prefers to wait until the offseason to address Leonard’s future in the name of maintaining maximum financial flexibility.

That strategy does come with an element of risk, since Leonard is sure to attract max offer sheets of varying contract lengths on July 1, his first day as a restricted free agent. But the Spurs would have the right to match any offer Leonard gets next summer in that scenario and would be able to do so with a better feel about how much longer stalwarts Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili want to keep playing. If the Spurs were to extend Leonard’s contract now, and then either Duncan or Ginobili — or both — decides to retire, San Antonio’s cap space to replace them would be lessened significantly.

Not coming to an agreement hardly pushes the Spurs into crisis mode — they still retain Leonard’s rights, and next summer, when Leonard becomes a restricted free agent, the Spurs will have the right to match any contract offer he receives. But after Leonard’s performance in the NBA Finals, he seems primed for a breakout season, and it is highly likely he could draw a maximum contract offer from a franchise looking for game-changing building block.

Not coming to an agreement with Leonard would seem to indicate that the Spurs are comfortable letting another franchise set the market for Leonard. And with San Antonio’s big three of Duncan, Ginobili and Tony Parker getting older, how the Spurs respond to an offer to Leonard will shape their franchise for years to come.

Morning shootaround — Oct. 31


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 30

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Westbrook could miss 4-6 weeks | Cavs fall flat vs. Knicks | Smith calls out Faried | Brown rips Sixers’ rebuilding plan | Report: Cavs, Varejao closing in on deal

No. 1: Westbrook could miss 4-6 weeks — All those questions about the depth of the Oklahoma City Thunder? The chatter is about to get even louder. The Thunder’s star point guard, Russell Westbrook, suffered a hand injury and had to leave the game last night against the L.A. Clippers. Our own Scott Howard-Cooper provided some context to what the injury might mean for OKC, and then comes this news: according to Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman, Westbrook could miss four to six weeks as he heals up. The loss of Westbrook, combined with Kevin Durant already being out with a foot injury, spells trouble in Oklahoma:

The early indication is that Russell Westbrook could miss four to six weeks after fracturing the second metacarpal in his right hand Thursday against the Los Angeles Clippers.

It could keep the Thunder’s electric point guard sidelined through mid-December and add him to an already ridiculously long list of injured Oklahoma City players who are expected to miss the season’s first month.

The projected recovery time would cost Westbrook 15 games on the low end and as many as 21 contests. He would rejoin the lineup between Nov. 28 and Dec. 12.

Westbrook is scheduled to undergo further tests Friday in Oklahoma City.

“It’s just really pretty unbelievable. You’re kind of just shocked almost,” said Thunder forward Nick Collison of his team’s injury-riddled roster. “It’s not funny at all, but you almost have to laugh about it just because it’s so many guys.”

In all likelihood, the Thunder will go into its home opener Saturday against Denver with just eight healthy players. Only one is a point guard. Joining veteran Sebastian Telfair are Collison, Perry Jones, Serge Ibaka, Andre Roberson, Kendrick Perkins, Steven Adams and Lance Thomas.

Under the league’s hardship rule, however, teams can be granted additional roster spots and exceed the maximum of 15 players if they have been depleted by injuries. At least four players must be injured for at least two weeks and must miss at least three regular season games for a team to qualify.

Oklahoma City, which the league recently denied the hardship exception because it had not yet met the games missed criteria, certainly will be eligible now with Durant, Anthony Morrow, Mitch McGary and Grant Jerrett all set to miss Saturday’s game against the Nuggets.

With Westbrook now out for an extended period, the Thunder could soon add two players to its roster, bringing the team’s total number of players to 17.

Still, the Thunder needs help. Now.

The eight remaining players consist of one borderline All-Star (Ibaka), two defensive-oriented big men (Perkins and Collison), three largely unproven players who possess promise (Adams, Roberson and Jones), one journeyman (Telfair) and one training camp survivor (Thomas).

“It’s unfortunate the way it is right now, but that’s the way it is,” said Thunder coach Scott Brooks. “We have to figure out how we can improve and get better from all of our experiences. And this is going to be a tough one, but the good teams, good players bounce back through adversity.”

Westbrook ironically was the Thunder’s healthiest player before Thursday. Of course, Westbrook missed 36 games last season after undergoing three surgeries on his right knee in 2013.


VIDEO: Russell Westbrook suffers a hand fracture against the Clippers

 

Thunder lose Westbrook to hand injury


VIDEO: Russell Westbrook injures his right hand midway through the second quarter against the Clippers

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The injury issues continue to pile up for the Oklahoma City Thunder just two games into this NBA season.

Kevin Durant is already out for anywhere from six to eight weeks after fracturing his foot, an injury that required surgery, in training camp. Russell Westbrook left Thursday’s loss to the Clippers with a “small fracture” in his right hand, according to Thunder coach Scott Brooks, who disclosed the diagnosis after the game in Los Angeles. Westbrook will be reevaluated on Friday.

Westbrook appeared to hit his hand on the elbow of Thunder big man Kendrick Perkins as they both went after a rebound in front of the basket midway through the second quarter. Westbrook went to the locker room and did not return before the halftime break. He was later ruled out for the rest of the game, per TNT’s David Aldridge.

This after a 38-point, six-assist effort on opening night in Portland Wednesday.

The Thunder now face the prospect of playing an extended period without either Durant or Westbrook. In their six years in Oklahoma City, they’ve played exactly one game without one or the other. At this point, there’s no timetable for Westbrook’s return.

One Stat, One Play: Space for LeBron


VIDEO: One Stat, One Play: Space for LeBron

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Cleveland Cavaliers led the preseason in offensive efficiency, even though LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love only played together in two of their seven games.

They’re a safe bet to lead the regular season in offensive efficiency too, and some smart people believe that they have a shot at being the most efficient offensive team in NBA history.

When you have James, Irving, Love, and some guys that can knock down shots, you’re going to score a lot of points. You could probably take away Irving or Love and the Cavs would still finish with a top-three offense.

But there’s one aspect of the Cleveland offense that I still have a question about. It’s regarding who else is on the floor, and how much space the Cavs will provide for one of the best finishers the league has ever seen.

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The above video is the first installment of “One Stat, One Play,” and it deals with James’ trips into the paint.

Cavs hit hardwood lab in search of chemistry


VIDEO: LeBron James says he isn’t nervous about his first game back with the Cavs

CLEVELAND – As scary old Halloween movies fill our flat-screens with images of mad scientists and dungeon laboratories this time of year, we’re never far from reminders about chemistry’s importance.

NBA teams, either.

Those that have it – like the San Antonio Spurs and others – know it and trust it. Those that don’t – most lottery teams and assorted underachievers – wish they did. And then there are newbies, like the Cleveland Cavaliers. With their shiny new ingredients and lofty expectations, the Cavs at the moment are like a start-up pharmaceutical firm, seeking FDA approval as they hit the market on the fly.

Forward Kevin Love, hours before tipoff of the Cavaliers’ opener against New York Thursday at Quicken Loans Arena (8 p.m. ET, TNT), was asked about his team’s chemistry after the morning shootaround session.

“It’s been a pretty smooth transition,” Love said. “We all have been able to get along. Doesn’t matter if we’re rookies like Joe Harris or 15, 16 years in like Matrix (Shawn Marion) or Mike Miller. So we have good continuity off the floor. The problem is we just have to get on the floor together. No matter what, our first month of training camp, it is only a month.

“Seven, eight preseason games isn’t going to do it. So it’s going to take us a little longer than that. Hopefully our talent and our execution and our discipline will help us get over the top our first several games.”

Basketball at its best is five men on a string, offensively and defensively. The string? That’s Xs & Os, sure, but it’s also familiarity, trust and chemistry.

Love said he’s curious to see how the Cavs pieces fit, same as many fans.

“And I’ll keep saying this, it’s going to take a little bit of time. Like anybody in their first 10, 20 games,” he said. “But once we figure out our niche and what works for us, we’re gonna go to that.”

LeBron James has gone through this before. He developed into a leader in his first Cleveland stint, learned how to defer while leading with Miami and now shoulders the primary responsibility for knitting together this new group.

“It just comes natural,” James said. “For me as a leader and just as a person that’s very outgoing, it just comes natural. There’s no book to how to build chemistry. Just you either have it or you don’t.”

That might seem a wee blithe, but then, James did sound and say he was awfully relaxed heading into this latest, much-anticipated chapter of team building and championship chasing.

“I’m very relaxed right now. I’m actually sleepy,” James said at about 11 a.m. ET. “I’m ready to go home and lay down. It’s my [nap] bedtime, what I do on a game day. Once the hours kind of count down and the minutes count down to game time, it gets a little more warmer in here, the excitement will begin.”

There weren’t any jitters on the eve of this Cleveland reset for the NBA’s best player. He stayed home and flipped around, watching as many of the league’s 12 games as he could.

“I love the game of basketball so it was great to see so many teams playing and I knew it was our time after last night,” James said. “For me, none of us should take this moment for granted. This is probably one of the biggest sporting events [in Cleveland] ever.”

New Cavaliers coach David Blatt talked of team chemistry almost clinically, as if he’ll be working in a lab coat on the sideline Thursday. Blatt will be making his NBA debut at age 55, after 33 years playing and coaching basketball internationally.

“Simplify. Designate,” Blatt said, specifying the surest ways to fast-track some chemistry into a “Hi, My Name Is…” group of players new to each other.

“Lock in on a minimal number of things and try to grow from that point. Stick to principles, stay fundamental and willing to stay the course, and ultimately to grow. That’s what I’m trying to do.”

Blatt said he would happily let James address the team in their pregame meeting. And James said that, after his nap, he would tabulate the results of his informal Twitter poll of fans whether he should go back to the chalk-toss ritual of his first stay in Cleveland.