2015 Free Agency — Day 3


VIDEO: David Aldridge with the latest on LaMarcus Aldridge

From NBA.com staff reports

The first day of NBA free agency was a spending spree. The second day? More of the same. Yet even after that — and more big names (Monta Ellis, Greg Monroe, Tim Duncan) and small names (Aron Baynes, Ed Davis) reaching deals — we’re still waiting for two of the biggest fish in the free-agent pond to swim to their future homes.

Will we finally see DeAndre Jordan and LaMarcus Aldridge make their choice today? That’s still unclear. But what is clear is we’ll be on top of all the latest buzz in free agency all day long …

Report: Kings set to talk with Smith, Williams — 9:29 a.m.

The Sacramento Kings lost out on Wesley Matthews in free agency, but they’re not giving up on a remodel just yet …

Don’t think players aren’t noticing these deals — 9:19 a.m.

Free agency has gotten off to a frantic pace and the deals are flying fast and furious — facts that aren’t lost on the players …

Report: Jordan could make decision today — 8:28 a.m.

Ben Bolch of the Los Angeles Times says DeAndre Jordan has heard all the pitches and wooing. Now he’s weighing it all over and will decide soon

The free-agent center heard a comprehensive pitch Thursday night from the Clippers, the last of four teams to woo one of the NBA’s top defenders and rebounders over a two-day span.

Clippers executives touched on a variety of topics during the three-hour meeting, including increased marketing opportunities for a player who has lagged in that department behind teammates Chris Paul and Blake Griffin, star pitchmen for several national brands. Coach Doc Rivers also addressed tensions between Paul and Jordan that have given the center pause about his desire to continue playing for the only NBA team he has known in his seven professional seasons.

A person close to Jordan who attended the meeting described the Clippers’ presentation as “tight,” saying “they had their stuff together.”

Jordan was expected to weigh everything he had heard from the Clippers, Lakers, Dallas Mavericks and New York Knicks over the previous 48 hours and make a decision as soon as Friday, though there was some thought he would wait for free-agent forward LaMarcus Aldridge to pick a team before declaring his intentions.

 

 

Morning shootaround — July 3


VIDEO: The Heat will get a crack at pitching to LaMarcus Aldridge

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JULY 3 ON NBA TV: Free Agent Fever: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET ***

DAY 2: Complete Free Agency Recap

Report: Lakers, Heat get meeting with Aldridge | Matthews, Mavs agree to deal | Report: Cavs, Dellavedova nearing dealReport: Lopez, Knicks have near-deal | Suns make their intentions known

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Report: Lakers get second meeting with Aldridge; Heat on tap, too — The old saying goes that everyone deserves a second chance. Apparently that’s true in NBA free agency as the Los Angeles Lakers got another shot at wooing LaMarcus Aldridge after their first attempt was more or less poorly received by free agency’s No. 1 target. Mike Bresnahan and Broderick Turner of the Los Angeles Times have more on the second Aldridge-Lakers meeting, which wasn’t too impressive to Aldridge either:

The Lakers got a do-over with LaMarcus Aldridge, an attempt to amend their pitch to the free-agent power forward Thursday after their initial Tuesday night presentation flopped.

The effort was improved, but Aldridge apparently wasn’t “wooed by it,” according to a person familiar with the meeting.

Figuring they had nothing to lose, the Lakers requested a second meeting and were granted it, sitting down in a much less crowded room with Aldridge and fully aware he thought their initial message was too heavy on branding opportunities in Los Angeles and too light on actual basketball talk.

Aldridge was particularly down on the first presentation’s lack of analytics and on-court projections, something General Manager Mitch Kupchak and Coach Byron Scott hoped to change as the Lakers’ only representatives Thursday.

It was unclear what Aldridge immediately thought of the redo, or “follow-up” as the team tried to phrase it, but the Lakers were believed to have accented his importance in the franchise’s attempted turnaround after a 21-61 season. Another glaring issue that needed revisiting — their lack of an effective center, an increasingly important concept for a four-time All-Star who preferred playing only power forward.

The Lakers currently have two big men with NBA experience — center Robert Sacre and power forward Tarik Black. They have failed to find any others.

The Lakers’ meeting with free-agent center DeAndre Jordan on Wednesday didn’t come close to making a dent in his plan to go to Dallas or stay with the Clippers.

Before free agency began, the Lakers were the co-favorites with San Antonio to pry Aldridge from Portland, but that was scuttled after their failed first crack at him.

ESPN.com’s Ramona Shelburne also confirms the Aldridge meeting with the Lakers and has info on his planned meeting with the Heat, too:

One source with knowledge of both meetings said it took more than an hour before the Lakers laid out a vision for rebuilding their roster and how Aldridge fit into that in the first meeting. The presentation also was wholly lacking in analytics, which came across even worse after the analytics-minded Houston Rockets followed them into the room Tuesday night.

After getting feedback on Aldridge’s reaction to their presentation, the Lakers requested and were granted a second meeting Thursday night. One source said they made a point of apologizing to the 29-year-old Aldridge for not giving a more well-rounded presentation and thanking him for giving them a second chance. In addition to general manager Mitch Kupchak and coach Byron Scott, they brought assistant coach Mark Madsen to the presentation. Madsen is the liaison between the coaching staff and the franchise’s analytics staff.

After meeting with the Lakers, Aldridge left for a dinner meeting with Miami Heat president Pat Riley, a source told ESPN’s Marc Stein. The Heat’s foray into the Aldridge sweepstakes comes hours after the team agreed with Dwyane Wade on a one-year, $20 million contract. The Heat would have to shed significant contracts and players to clear enough room to make a maximum contract offer to Aldridge, or work with the Portland Trail Blazers on a sign-and-trade likely involving Chris Bosh.

One team apparently out of the Aldridge sweepstakes is the New York Knicks, as the veteran forward canceled his planned meeting with the team, according to reports.


VIDEO: David Aldridge on the Lakers’ free-agency pitch to LaMarcus Aldridge

***  

Wade, Heat do the right thing


VIDEO: Wade agrees to one-year contract with Miami

It was, of course, the only deal that made sense for both Dwyane Wade and the Heat.

It didn’t get Wade the maximum amount for which he was eligible and it still doesn’t make him the highest-paid player on the Miami roster next season (Chris Bosh, $22 million). But Wade got his raise from the $16 million due before opting out and leaves him the option of hitting the jackpot next summer when the salary cap is expected to go through the roof. Assuming, that is, Wade can stay healthy and prove that he’s still at an All-Star level in a season when he turns 34.

That age and the questions about his durability are why Heat president Pat Riley was only too happy to give Wade the bump for next season, while also keeping his options open for the Summer of 2016 free agent-palooza. Then Riley went right from the handshake on the deal to boarding a plane for L.A. where he was scheduled to have dinner Thursday night with free agent LaMarcus Aldridge.

From the moment that LeBron James turned his back on the Heat to return to Cleveland, there was no way Riley was going to allow his team to wallow in mediocrity for long. Since missing the playoffs last season, the Heat have gotten point guard Goran Dragic to re-sign for five years and $90 million and had talented rookie Justise Winslow fall in its lap at the No. 10 pick in the draft. Pencil in a recovering Bosh (blood clots) and center Hassan Whiteside, entering the last year of his contract, and the Heat have an opening night lineup that could probably stand toe-to-toe with any team in the Eastern Conference.

According to reports, Wade has lost 10 pounds so far in his commitment to getting back into top physical condition and now he’s again a key part of a team that can make noise. Without Bosh at the end of the season, Wade showed that he was still capable of performing at a high level and now going into his 13th NBA season has a platform to shine.

Wade simply wasn’t going to get a longer term deal from any other team that paid him top dollar for 2015-16, leaving only the alternative of taking less to go elsewhere — Cavaliers, Lakers, Clippers — out of spite.

Now the franchise icon gets to set himself up for a chance at the multi-year commitment next summer, while Riley and the Heat keep doing the full-tilt boogie to get back in the ring business. That’s a win all around.

Old Man River Walk keeps rolling

Well, the cat had at least a paw out of the bag when Tim Duncan was a member of the Spurs entourage that traveled to L.A. to make a free agent pitch to L.A.

But while San Antonio is still awaiting word from LaMarcus Aldridge if he’ll float their championship hopes for another River Walk parade next June, the walking legend Duncan confirmed that he will be back for his 19th NBA season with the Spurs in 2015-16.

There is still the matter of working out the details of a contract, but these are the Spurs we’re talking about and that won’t be a problem. The free agency period had barely begun on Wednesday when a new five-year, $90-million deal for Kawhi Leonard was announced. Then Danny Green passed up a chance to get bigger bucks on the open market by signing a four-year, $45-million contract to stay with “the family.” And Duncan has been playing below market value for years.

The 39-year-old Duncan is coming off a season where he started 77 games, averaging 13.9 points, 9.1 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 2.0 blocked shots in 28.9 minutes per game. Then he bumped those numbers up in the playoffs.

Duncan has always said he’ll keep playing as long as he’s healthy and having fun. Put Aldridge in the Spurs lineup and that could be a while.

Time for Butler and Rose to prove, or build, their on-court chemistry


VIDEO: How does Jimmy Butler’s reported deal help the Bulls’ future?

CHICAGO – Jimmy Butler got a lot of mileage, and an even bigger pile of moolah, from gambling on himself last season with the Chicago Bulls.

From this point forward – from the moment he signs that five-year, $95 million contract he reportedly accepted Wednesday when NBA free agency began – it’s the Bulls and their fans who are gambling on Butler.

So he might as well stop now with the “basketball’s just a day job” statement he tosses around a couple times in a RollingStone.com interview posted Thursday. And he needs to get a whole lot more convincing that the relationship between Bulls backcourt mate Derrick Rose and himself is solid enough, professional enough, to get Chicago’s NBA entry where it wants to go.

Butler’s most pertinent comments were what he said about published reports that he and Rose were at odds last season in what some felt was a battle over pecking order within the team.

Here’s what Butler, in the interview conducted after the Bulls’ postseason but before his free agency, told RollingStone.com:

“I don’t think we have any issues. I think we’re fine. I think we’re two basketball players that want to win games. That’s where I’ll leave it at. I think we just wanna win, bring a championship the city, to the organization. I think that’s our job. And I think we’re gonna do whatever it takes to make that happen. I have a lot of respect for the guy.”

Before we parse that, some context: Rose still is the darling of many Chicagoans, a native of the city’s South Side who established himself soon after he arrived in 2008 as the Bulls’ best player since Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen by becoming the youngest MVP in league history in 2011. Three knee surgeries and 185 missed games over the past three seasons allowed Butler to develop into the team’s most impactful player.

Rose’s rehabs and Butler’s own injuries have limited their time together on the court – they have teamed in only 53 games, with the Bulls going 33-20. Butler had a breakout 2014-15, earning an All-Star selection and Kia Most Improved Player Award honors while Rose played inconsistently and missed 31 games.

In Chicago’s two rounds against Milwaukee and Cleveland, Butler averaged 22.9 points on 17.8 field-goal attempts while Rose averaged 20.3 on 19.6. In their Game 6 elimination by the Cavaliers in May, a noticeably passive Rose took only four shots after halftime and scored two points in 17 minutes compared to Butler’s 12 shots and eight points in almost 22 minutes.

The reports of friction surfaced soon thereafter. General manager Gar Forman addressed them on Draft night (“I’ve read about the friction. I haven’t seen it”) without quelling any.

So what should people make of Butler’s “I don’t think we have any issues. I think we’re fine” comment? Or his “I think we’re two basketball players that want to win games. That’s where I’ll leave it at” remark? While he also said he never read the reports – healthy enough, given what passes for media these days – he stopped well short of a full-throated condemnation, not to mention expressions of camaraderie with Rose.

Was it an indication that Butler doesn’t enjoy playing alongside Rose? Was it a hint that whatever chafing might exist is coming from Rose’s direction rather than his own? There’s not enough there to work with and, frankly, any sweeping pronouncements now might ring hollow until all concerned step on the Advocate Center practice court.

But the bottom line for Chicago’s NBA fans is, there’s no time and even less tolerance for any high-school stuff. If the Bulls’ window as an Eastern Conference contender is still open at all, it’s an opening that’s narrowing. Rookie coach Fred Hoiberg is going to have plenty to do without coddling Butler and Rose into playing nice together. If Walt Frazier and Earl Monroe could manage to mesh their way to a Knicks title back in the day, if Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook find enough basketball to get all the way to The Finals, Rose and Butler can.

Butler’s emergence is what the Bulls have been hoping for – and what Rose long has needed: a backcourt sidekick with game and ability to lessen his load offensively and handle defensively perimeter players Rose can’t. Butler, meanwhile, has spent four seasons doing terrific work, yet almost everything he’s achieved has felt like a bonus. Now those things and more are expected – and they’re being paid for at top dollar.

So toying with a music-and-culture journalists about hanging with Mark Wahlberg, wanting to impress Taylor Swift with his singing voice and portraying himself only as a basketball player by day is fine in July. Butler is known within the Bulls as a fun-loving cut-up and he seems playful in the interview overall. After his hard-knocks upbringing in Tomball, Texas, and No. 30 selection out of Marquette as the final first-round pick in 2011, he has earned the right to walk through a few new doors opened to him.

But focusing on the untapped promise not just of himself but the Bulls overall, and building the chemistry with Rose (vice versa) needed for them to function nightly as one of the NBA’s elite backcourts has to be a 24/7 commitment. It need not wait till training camp, either.

The Bulls gambled on Rose to the tune of five years and $94.3 million right after his MVP season, and largely have lost on that deal. It’s on Butler to see that it doesn’t happen again, especially for some silly reasons.

2015 Free Agency — Day 2


VIDEO: David Aldridge with the latest on LaMarcus Aldridge

From NBA.com staff reports

To call the opening day of NBA free agency anything other than a spending spree would be a misnomer. From superstars to mid-level players to even role players, big-money contract agreements were bandied about and agreed to …

If you missed it, here’s everything that happened in Day 1. And, as we head into Day 2 of the free-agent frenzy, keep up with the latest buzz as surely more and more names reach deals.

Highlights

The world is still waiting on LaMarcus — 1:21 a.m.

The Spurs, Suns, Mavericks and the rest of the free agents still on the market are all waiting for LaMarcus Aldridge to decide.

Matthews to Dallas — 1:06 a.m.

It seems no one wants to deal with the dysfunction in Sacramento right now. Wes Matthews certainly does not. He turned down the Kings for Dallas.

 

Morning shootaround — July 2


VIDEO: What were the best signings from the first day of free agency?

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JULY 2 ON NBA TV: Free Agent Fever: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET ***

DAY 1: Complete Free Agency Recap

Spending spree marks first day of free agency | Report: Lakers fail to impress Aldridge; Blazers hoping for Aldridge-Monroe combo | Report: Three guards on Kings’ wish list | Clippers hoping Pierce deal leads Jordan to return | West reveals why he’s leaving Indiana

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Recapping a busy Day 1 of free agency — The chatter during yesterday’s free-agent period opened, essentially, with Damian Lillard and the Trail Blazers talking about a long-term extension. By the time 1 a.m. or so rolled around today, it’s hard to keep tabs on just how many actual free agents agreed to deals. From the big names (Kevin Love, Paul Pierce, Paul Millsap) to the mid-range ones (DeMarre Carroll, Danny Green, Tristan Thompson) to smaller ones (Kyle Singler, Brandan Wright), moves were happening constantly. Our Steve Aschburner tries to make sense of what was a crazy busy day: 

“Unfinished business” was the term Kevin Love used, more or less kicking off the first day of NBA free agency Wednesday with his announcement, via The Players’ Tribune, that he would be sticking with Cleveland Cavaliers in pursuit of LeBron James-led championships.

“Irrational exuberance,” though, was the label that came to mind as the shopping and the bidding and the spending (pledges of it, anyway, when deals actually can be consummated July 9) spiraled ever higher. That phrase was former Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan‘s, used to characterize the overheated stock market during the dot.com bubble of the 1990s.

From Love and Cleveland teammates Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert to San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, from young franchise cornerstones such as Anthony Davis and Damian Lillard to DeMarre Carroll becoming Toronto’s highest paid player, the frenzy to find, pitch and lock up players at heretofore staggering amounts of money was more than even some players could grasp.

With so much of the NBA’s business focused on the summer of 2016 – when the revenue from broadcast rights increases geometrically, taking the salary cap from about $69 million to an estimated $90 million – owners and general managers dug deep to cut deals at 2015 prices. Or, more accurately, at 2015’s percentage of payroll.

Look at it this way: an $11 million player by 2016-17, for example, will eat up the same amount of cap space as a $7.7 player this past season ($63 million cap). That could turn a number of Wednesday’s personal lottery payoffs into something if not reasonable by an average Joe’s or Jill’s standards, at least into something manageable.

One of the surprises of the day, then, was that so many players were willing to lock in rather than hold off or “gimmick-contract” their way to another bite at the platinum apple in a year or two. Love, perhaps thinking of his own troubling history of injuries, went “all in” with the Cavaliers, grabbing a deal that will still be in effect when James turns 35. Davis dried up the premature drooling in Chicago and probably 28 other markets by teams and fans hoping to pry him loose from New Orleans sooner than 2021.

Here was another surprise: Of the top 15 or so players who agreed to terms Wednesday, 10 or more (depending on your rankings) chose to stay put, re-signing with their current teams. Of those who will be playing elsewhere come autumn, Tyson Chandler‘s four-year, $52 million deal with Phoenix and Carroll’s four-year, $60 million package with the Raptors probably rate as the biggest moves.


VIDEO: What were the under-the-radar moves from Day 1?

***  

Free agents ‘at 2015 prices’ trigger NBA’s Day 1 spending spree


VIDEO: Free agents winners and losers after Day 1

“Unfinished business” was the term Kevin Love used, more or less kicking off the first day of NBA free agency Wednesday with his announcement, via The Players’ Tribune, that he would be sticking with Cleveland Cavaliers in pursuit of LeBron James-led championships.

“Irrational exuberance,” though, was the label that came to mind as the shopping and the bidding and the spending (pledges of it, anyway, when deals actually can be consummated July 9) spiraled ever higher. That phrase was former Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan‘s, used to characterize the overheated stock market during the dot.com bubble of the 1990s.

From Love and Cleveland teammates Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert to San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, from young franchise cornerstones such as Anthony Davis and Damian Lillard to DeMarre Carroll becoming Toronto’s highest paid player, the frenzy to find, pitch and lock up players at heretofore staggering amounts of money was more than even some players could grasp:

By 7 p.m. Eastern time, with several agreed-upon deals to go, NBA teams had committed approximately $1.1 billion dollars to players who hit the open market at 12:01 a.m. Among the biggest contracts: Love’s five-year, $110 million to stay with Cleveland, Davis’ five-year, $145 million extension to play for the Pelicans for the next six seasons and Lillard’s $120 million over five years to serve, perhaps, as Portland’s last tent-pole player as the Blazers face a potential rebuild.
And just because that sort of spending wasn’t unprecedented …

… doesn’t mean it wasn’t breathtaking.

With so much of the NBA’s business focused on the summer of 2016 – when the revenue from broadcast rights increases geometrically, taking the salary cap from about $69 million to an estimated $90 million – owners and general managers dug deep to cut deals at 2015 prices. Or, more accurately, at 2015’s percentage of payroll.

Look at it this way: an $11 million player by 2016-17, for example, will eat up the same amount of cap space as a $7.7 player this past season ($63 million cap). That could turn a number of Wednesday’s personal lottery payoffs into something if not reasonable by an average Joe’s or Jill’s standards, at least into something manageable.

One of the surprises of the day, then, was that so many players were willing to lock in rather than hold off or “gimmick-contract” their way to another bite at the platinum apple in a year or two. Love, perhaps thinking of his own troubling history of injuries, went “all in” with the Cavaliers, grabbing a deal that will still be in effect when James turns 35. Davis dried up the premature drooling in Chicago and probably 28 other markets by teams and fans hoping to pry him loose from New Orleans sooner than 2021.

Here was another surprise: Of the top 15 or so players who agreed to terms Wednesday, 10 or more (depending on your rankings) chose to stay put, re-signing with their current teams. Of those who will be playing elsewhere come autumn, Tyson Chandler‘s four-year, $52 million deal with Phoenix and Carroll’s four-year, $60 million package with the Raptors probably rate as the biggest moves.

(It will be interesting to see Carroll playing north of the border, technically making him an international player. He’s the guy who, when asked during the Eastern Conference finals what he might say to Cleveland’s feisty Matthew Dellavedova about his reckless play, wondered if the “foreigner” even spoke English. Like Australians, Carroll will learn, Canadians mostly speak English too.)

There was, of course, plenty of unfinished business. LaMarcus Aldridge was the straw stirring Wednesday’s drink, even as his interviewing of teams continued. San Antonio emerged as a likely destination for the All-Star power forward, if he does leave Portland, with the Spurs pitching a baton hand-off from Tim Duncan to Aldridge and a makeover on the fly with Leonard and the team’s aging core still formidable enough to contend.

Things didn’t go well, apparently, for the Los Angeles Lakers in their wooing of Aldridge. Word leaked almost immediately that the Blazers’ big man was unimpressed by a lack of vision for the on-the-court product. Glitz alone didn’t look as if it would cut it, with the Lakers said to be dropped from Aldridge’s list.

Other names remain in play: Marc Gasol, Greg Monroe, DeAndre Jordan, Monta Ellis, Wesley Matthews, Rajon Rondo, Reggie Jackson, Dwyane Wade and James himself. Draymond Green reportedly got a deal done later in the day with Golden State, suffering a hiccup or two more than Leonard or Jimmy Butler as a restricted player who wasn’t required to secure an offer sheet elsewhere.

The Lakers had their Aldridge embarrassment while their East Coast counterparts as marquee franchise mired in current muck, the New York Knicks, registered barely a blip on Day 1. In the NBA of 2015, the Cleveland Cavaliers committed in excess of $230 million to three players (Love, Thompson, Shumpert) while the Knicks looked to have trouble getting people even to take their calls.

That all could change Thursday, naturally. And we’re pretty certain to see fireworks Friday and Saturday, on both the Old Glory and new money fronts.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 205) Featuring Pete Philo

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Kristaps Porzingis knows all of the names that came before him, all of the international big men who were supposed to be game changers that didn’t live up to the hype.

The ghost of Darko Milicic, and others, lingers for a youngster like the Porzingis, the Latvian 7-footer the New York Knicks selected with the fourth pick in last week’s NBA Draft.

But Porzingis insists he’s different. He’s prepared to break the mold and is ready to embrace the pressure of playing on the biggest stage the NBA has to offer.

The question is does he have the chops to live up to his own words? 

And that’s a question guys like Pete Philo, the Indiana Pacers’ director of international scouting, get paid to figure out for their respective teams. Their work digging up the details on players most of us have never seen play in the flesh, can be the difference between success and failure for a guy like Porzingis.

Step 1 of the NBA’s summer hoops Holy Trinity is the Draft, which was handled last week with plenty of surprises, including Porzingis.

Step 2 is the Free Agent Fever (on NBA TV and NBA.com starting today and going strong until all of the big names agree to deals) going on right now.

Step 3, Summer League action in Orlando, Salt Lake City and Las Vegas kicks off life fireworks on July 4.

We’ve got you covered on all three steps of the process on Episode 205 of the Hang Time Podcast featuring Pete Philo. He joins us to talk Draft, the work that goes on behind the scenes and what that spawns in free agency, summer league ball and beyond.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: Does Kristaps Porzingis have what it takes to snap the international big man jinx? Knicks fans certainly hope so, as does Phil Jackson and the Knicks’ brain trust

2015 Free Agency — Day 1


VIDEO: Kevin Love returns to Cleveland

From NBA.com staff reports

Last night’s opener to the free agency season in the NBA was like many more before it — some initial movement, a couple of re-signings here and there and, for the most part, a formal starting of the rumor mill.

The biggest moves last night were by one player who wasn’t even on the free-agent market this summer (Anthony Davis) and another who wasn’t expected to go far from his home team (Kawhi Leonard). Both players reportedly agreed to deals with their current teams — the New Orleans Pelicans and San Antonio Spurs, respectively — and earned big paydays to boot.

Davis reportedly agreed to a five-year, $145 million maximum contract while Leonard got a reported five-year, $90 million deal. The Portland Trail Blazers also reached a reported four-year, $30 million deal with free-agent forward Al-Farouq Aminu. Aside from those moves, the Brooklyn Nets are finalizing deals with Brook Lopez and Thaddeus Young while the Pacers are hot on the trail of Monta Ellis.

As we dig into Day 1 of free agency, keep up on all the latest buzz below …

Highlights