Blogtable: Thoughts on the NBA’s away-from-play rules changes

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on away-from-play rules changesBiggest turnaround with new coach?Incoming rookie destined for NBA stardom?


> Last week the NBA announced some rules changes for away-from-the-play fouls. Do you think these changes went too far, didn’t go far enough, or were just right?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comDid not go far enough. This was clearly a compromise, trying to satisfy the players-need-to-make-their-free-throws purists as well as the this-is-unwatchable critics of “Hack-a-…” tactics. It will cut down on the number of incidents but it won’t eliminate it. I’m not a big fan of different rules for different parts of the game. So I’m hoping what we get in the final two minute of each period now, we’ll soon get for all 48 minutes.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI’m fine with it as long as guys like Isaiah Thomas, Chris Paul, Ty Lawson, Darren Collison, D.J. Augustin, Aaron Brooks and J.J. Barea get to use a step-stool because the basket is too high. And now that I think about it, Dwight Howard should also be permitted to shoot at a basket that is twice as large in diameter all throughout the game because, in addition to his horrible free throw shooting, he also can’t make any kind of shot more than 2 feet from the basket. To paraphrase a famous cartoon character: “Let’s make the NBA dumb again.”

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comJust right. The rule change they got especially right was the automatic for jumping on a player’s back. That’s very reasonable. But altering the away-from-the-play fouls to the final two minutes of every quarter, as opposed to just the fourth period, is a good step. Adopting the D-League rule of every minute of every quarter would have been an option, but also an extreme move. I still say there is no need for that dramatic of a move to address three or four players. Let’s start with this and re-assess.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Just about right. I cringe at the idea of making rule changes just because a small sampling of players can’t perform one of the more fundamental facets of the game. And so the league essentially made a compromise of sorts. It’s going to be good enough for some people, and not enough for Jeff Van Gundy.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comNot far enough. An intentional foul is an intentional foul, no matter when it occurs in the period. And on other levels of basketball, it’s penalized with free throws and possession. Away from the play intentional fouls, as well as intentional fouls meant to stop a fast break, should be penalized as such. And with the latter, we can get rid of the time-wasting and confusing clear path rule.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The rules changes feel as close to just right and reasonable as we’re going to get for fundamental flaws that plague a select few players in the league. I never like to see a league legislating for the few at the expense of the masses, but I agree that something had to be done. With all of the time players spend in the gym in the offseason, I just wish certain guys would fine-tune their free throw shooting mechanics so no one would have to tweak or change the rules.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comI disagree with the fundamental point of view. This little issue is not about whether players can or cannot make free throws. As I see it, these are fouls against the spirit of the game. If you wish to commit a foul cynically, away from the play, then you are committing a foul against the game. Your cynicism should not be rewarded. These fouls are not committed in the spirit of basketball. And so when a coach acts cynically, he should be punished: The other team should retain control of the ball after one or two free throws.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogWell, I was firmly in the camp of not wanting anything to be done, because I felt like changing the rules was in some way rewarding/protecting the small minority who can’t make free throws. So considering the size of the change that was announced, maybe it’s just right? Although part of me suspects if teams really want to Hack-A-Whomever, they’ll figure out a way to do it. I am particularly interested to see how Mike Budenholzer adjusts to it, since last season he used it several times against teams like Detroit to grab a lead, and now he’ll have Dwight Howard on his own team.

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