NBA voices concerns over controversial North Carolina law

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The NBA has formally expressed concerns over controversial legislation North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory signed into law Wednesday.

The Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, implements a statewide policy that bans individuals from using public bathrooms that do not correspond to their biological sex. House Bill 2 also gives the state, and not individual cities, the right to pass nondiscrimination legislation.

The 2017 NBA All-Star Game is scheduled for Charlotte, putting the league and its partners in the crosshairs of legislation that flies in the face of the diversity and inclusion efforts that they have championed for years.

McCrory sent out a tweet explaining why he signed the bill:

The NBA released a statement today condemning the legislation:

“The NBA is dedicated to creating an inclusive environment for all who attend our games and events.  We are deeply concerned that this discriminatory law runs counter to our guiding principles of equality and mutual respect and do not yet know what impact it will have on our ability to successfully host the 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte.”

Time Warner Inc., issued a statement of its own today urging Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to veto legislation that would encourage discrimination by not protecting same-sex marriage opponents:

At Time Warner, diversity in all its forms is core to our value system and to the success of our business. We strongly oppose the discriminatory language and intent of Georgia’s pending religious liberty bill, which clearly violates the values and principles of inclusion and the ability of all people to live and work free from discrimination.

All of our divisions – HBO, Warner Bros. and Turner – have business interests in Georgia, but none more than Turner, an active participant in the Georgia Prospers campaign, a coalition of business leaders committed to a Georgia that welcomes all people. Georgia bill HB 757 is in contradiction to this campaign, to the values we hold dear, and to the type of workplace we guarantee to our employees. We urge Governor Deal to exercise his veto.

Hollywood actors and producers have threatened to take their projects elsewhere if Deal does not veto the bill. The Human Rights Campaign sent a letter to Deal today. He has until May 3 to act. Deal opposed earlier versions but has not commented on the final bill.

 

 

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