One Team, One Stat: Efficient When He Gets the Chance


VIDEO: Schuhmann’s Advanced Stats: Toronto Raptors

NBA.com’s John Schuhmann gets you ready for the 2015-16 season with a key stat for each team in the league and shows you why it matters. Today, we look at the Toronto Raptors and an efficient scorer who saw relatively few touches.

The stat

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The context

20151023_tor_basicsAmong players who attempted at least 500 shots last season, Jonas Valanciunas ranked eighth in effective field goal percentage and 13th in free throw rate. The only other player to rank in the top 20 in both was DeAndre Jordan (first in both), but Valanciunas (78.6 percent) was a much better free throw shooter than Jordan (39.7 percent).

Another reason why Valanciunas is higher on the above list than Jordan is that he was less likely to pass the ball. While Jordan had 15 assists, potential assists or secondary assists per 100 frontcourt touches, Valanciunas had only nine.

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It’s hard to blame Valanciunas, because he didn’t touch the ball that much. He ranked 228th in the league in frontcourt touches last season, even though he played in 80 of the Raptors’ 82 games. Among starting centers, he ranked 25th in frontcourt touches per 36 minutes. He was one of the league’s most efficient scorers when he did touch the ball, but the Raptors’ guard-heavy offense was somehow worse when he was on the floor.

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The defense was also worse, which is easier to explain. Valanciunas’ slow feet in transition and on pick-and-roll coverage has consistently hurt his team’s ability to get stops. He ranked ninth on the team in fourth-quarter minutes, because coach Dwane Casey trusted his other bigs more.

The Raptors were the only team to go from the top 10 in defensive efficiency in 2013-14 to bottom 10 in ’14-15. The way to get back to the top 10 could include a quicker Valanciunas or just less of him on the court. It will definitely include a new scheme to keep pick-and-rolls on the side of the floor.

Offensively, Casey is looking for more ball movement and less reliance on his guards this season. That could lead to more opportunities for Valanciunas, though it will be hard for them to improve on an offense that ranked third in efficiency last season.

Valanciunas got a four-year contract extension this summer, but this is still a big season for the 23 year old’s development on both ends of the floor.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

2 Comments

  1. WhatupButterCup? says:

    …oops, typeo. I meant “why NOT make the most of his advantage on offence?”

  2. WhatupButterCup? says:

    Casey is messing up with Valanciunas. I can understand sitting him in situations because of his lack of quickness. But if he’s on the court and you consider him a defensive liability in some situations then why make the most of his advantage on offence? There was a game against Golden State last year where the Raptors were doing well early and Jonas was dominating. Casey pulled him. Why? GS hadn’t found a way to adapt and counter. Jonas was still dominating and GS was not cashing in on offence. Many fans were frustrated by so much of this kind of “strategy” by Casey last year. He may be good in many ways but it’s time to get a more effective coach.