One Team, One Stat: A New Defense in Utah


VIDEO: Schuhmann’s Advanced Stats: Utah Jazz

NBA.com’s John Schuhmann gets you ready for the 2015-16 season with a key stat for each team in the league and shows you why it matters. Today, we look at the Utah Jazz, who were a brand new team after the All-Star break.

The stat

20151018_uta_improvement

The context

20151018_uta_basicsAt 19-34, the Jazz were about even with the Kings before the break. At 19-10, they were about even with the Rockets after it.

The Jazz actually regressed offensively after the break, with an increase in turnovers being their biggest issue. But after ranking 27th in defensive efficiency before the break, they ranked first, by a wide margin, after it.

After All-Star, the difference between the No. 1 Jazz and the No. 2 Milwaukee Bucks (99.4 points allowed per 100 possessions) was greater than the difference between the Bucks and the 18th-ranked New Orleans Pelicans (102.8).

20151018_uta_before-after

The impetus for the improvement was one of the best examples of an addition-by-subtraction trade that we’ve seen in a long time. The Jazz didn’t receive any useful players in a three-team, deadline trade with Detroit and Oklahoma City. But they rid themselves of Enes Kanter, one of the league’s worst defenders.

The Jazz allowed 108 points per 100 possessions with Kanter on the floor before he was traded. For the season, opponents scored 111 points per 100 possessions when Kanter defended a pick-and-roll, according to SportVU. That was the worst mark among starting centers.

After the trade, Kanter was replaced in the Utah starting lineup by Rudy Gobert, the league’s best rim protector. Opponents shot 40.4 percent at the rim when Gobert was there to defend it, according to SportVU. That was the best mark among 100 players who defended at least four shots at the rim per game over 40 games.

Not only did the Jazz protect the rim better after the break, they defended the 3-point line better, rebounded better, and forced more turnovers.

20151018_uta_defense

The question now is how well the Jazz can sustain their post-break success over 82 games. If they’re the team this year that they were after the break last season, the Western Conference is even better than we thought.

Utah will miss the length of Dante Exum (out for the season with a torn ACL) on the perimeter. The defense was much better with Exum on the floor than with Trey Burke on the floor last season.

But Gobert will be a Defensive Player of the Year candidate, and if the last two months of last season weren’t a fluke, the Jazz will be competing for a playoff spot in the West.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

2 Comments

  1. Jeremythekidd says:

    Jazz defense was ridiculous scary the second half of last season. I don’t thing they can do that this year.

  2. jason says:

    The Jazz haven’t been noticed since Deron Williams and Carlos Boozer played. Now is their time to shine, the Jazz are looking deadly in the next couple of years. #JazzNation