Blogtable: Paul George the power forward?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?



VIDEOPaul George scores 32 vs. Pistons

> Paul George doesn’t seem sold on the move to power forward, but the Pacers sure do. How do you see it working out for PG-13 if he plays PF all season? And what would you suggest to George to help him through the change?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: The situation will work itself out for better or for worse, for this reason: You are what you can guard. I first heard that positional philosophy back in the day from Minnesota’s Flip Saunders and it’s true: George will be a “power forward” on those nights when he can defend the other guy’s. Given the number of stretch-4 types in the league nowadays, that’s not so grueling. As for advice, I’d suggest George not watch too many “Hardwood Classics” on NBA TV, where he’d risk being traumatized by seeing PFs such as Karl Malone, Charles Barkley, Kevin McHale, Rasheed Wallace, Buck Williams, Maurice Lucas, Elvin Hayes and other greats who put the “power” in that position before the NBA downsized. 

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI would suggest that George give it more than one preseason game. I would suggest that virtually every team in the league is using a variety of different big, small and in-between lineups that place an emphasis on versatility. I would suggest that he suck it up and go to work like a big boy.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comDepends how well he plays — and feels. It has a chance to work, and the benefit of the doubt should fall on the side of smart basketball minds with a successful track record thinking it is a positive. If it plays out for a little while and George does well, he will be fine. But since he already has hesitation, if he has a slow start to the regular season and the first few weeks is also filled with a physical pounding against power forwards, especially while defending bigger players, then the problem escalates. Let’s not assume the Pacers will forever force this on George. They want PG to get back to his previous level as much as he does. If the new look is not working, Frank Vogel can always make the switch back.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comWhen players say “I’ll do anything to help the team”, they don’t really mean it. Not 100 percent, anyway. The Pacers are lacking at that position and want to try a new style and he’s resisting. George is looking at it from the defensive end, where he’s giving up height and weight, rather from the offensive end, where he’ll be a matchup nightmare for most. Also, this will be his first full-season since his leg injury and as Larry Bird said, PG doesn’t need to spend his time chasing quicker players. He should give it an honest try (it’s only October!) and understand that the Pacers have his best long-term interests.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comLet’s note that George’s first preseason game at the four was against Anthony Davis and that he’s going to play 80 regular-season games against power forwards not named Anthony Davis. He’s also not going to play all of his minutes at the four. But I would advise him to give it some time and figure out how he can use the move to his advantage. Other power forwards won’t be able to deal with his quickness and stick with him on the perimeter, and he might actually have fun playing offense with the Pacers for the first time in a few years. Still, I’d advise the Pacers to keep an eye out for a better (bigger) fit at the stretch four position, who would allow George to play more or all of his minutes at the three.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I didn’t expect for this Paul George-at-power-forward experiment to go off without a few hiccups. George was apprehensive from the start and I suspect he’ll remain so until he gets more comfortable with this new wrinkle. I don’t know that he’ll have to log heavy minutes there all season. For as many advantages as he might exploit playing out of position like that, he’ll be at a disadvantage often enough that coach Frank Vogel will have to make some adjustments as well. I’d suggest he fight through whatever the struggles are and keep it professional. He’s already made clear that he’s not a huge fan of the move, but he’s looking out for the Pacers’ greater good above all else. His sacrifice will go a long way with folks inside of the organization and the fans who fill the seats at Bankers Life Fieldhouse.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comIf he’s concerned with playing against bigger opponents, his best response will be to attack them relentlessly. Force the other team to go small against him. The Pacers tried to play with a traditional 1980s-styled lineup and it carried them only so far. This move to power forward can enable George to be even more aggressive – and successful – if he buys in completely.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: If George thinks he’s still a 3, or maybe even a 2, that’s great. But has he seen the NBA the last few years? The NBA is going small, and positions are increasingly inconsequential. From a practical perspective, playing power forward shouldn’t make much of a difference for George, other than perhaps being asked to grab a few more rebounds than if he was on the perimeter. It might actually save his legs a bit on the defensive end, and on offense, if George is matched up against bigger power forwards, he can take them out to the perimeter and beat them off the dribble. Still don’t like the assignment? George can play NBA 2K16 and put himself at the 1 if he wants. But for the Pacers to have their best shot at winning, George may have to be open to playing where the team needs him most.

8 Comments

  1. sports fan says:

    Play him at PF against teams where he’ll have an advantage & play him at SF in games where he can’t match up at PF.

  2. Indiana'sownLarryBird says:

    PG at power forward sounds stupid.

  3. clutchcity says:

    blake griffin, anthony davis, lamarcus aldridge, chris bosh, dirk, zach randolph all guys pg won’t be able to handle in the post

  4. Pacers Fan says:

    If he can guard LeBron James, he can defend any PF, maybe except LaMarcus Aldridge and Tim Duncan. But hey can they really guard him??

  5. JSC says:

    I believe that PG will have a good season mostly at “PF”. but he will be shooting 3’s all day long.

  6. Eric Peraza says:

    He’ll be great at any position

  7. harriethehawk says:

    Stop crying and play basketball. The Pacers are whimps.

  8. marlon green says:

    It is really not a big deal. The league is playing small ball all the time these days. And those old days of bigs playing in the post is pretty much over so he will be fine.