Blogtable: What will you remember most about “Chocolate Thunder?”

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

 


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VIDEO: Remembering Darryl Dawkins

>The NBA lost one of its most charismatic players ever last week when Darryl Dawkins died at 58. What will you remember most about “Chocolate Thunder?”

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comThere have been three players who have come into the NBA since I started paying attention (initially as a kid) about whom I recall thinking, “How is anyone going to stop that guy?” The first was Kareem Abdul-Jabbar with his sky hook, the third was Shaquille O’Neal with his sheer size and brute force. The one in the middle was Dawkins, a man-child who seemed like he might unwittingly hurt himself or another player with the power and rawness of his game. That he never averaged nine rebounds in a season is, to me, a testament to how undeveloped his skills remained, until injuries undercut his career further. The shattered backboards were sideshow stuff, as I saw it, that didn’t help folks take him more seriously. As for his wacky quotes and personality, I always like the simplicity of this one: “When everything is said and done, there’s nothing left to do or say.” RIP, DD.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com:  Even as someone who was sitting courtside the night in Kansas City when Chocolate Thunder exploded the backboard, I’ll remember Darryl Dawkins more as the most friendly, charismatic, happy, fun-to-be-around person I have met in nearly four decades of covering the NBA.  Even nights when he was angry about something that happened during a game would end up with him cracking jokes and sending you away from his locker with a smile on your face.  He believed that enjoying life and enjoying people was more important than winning games.  Maybe that held Darryl back from reaching his full potential as a player, but it made him a special person.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com:  We didn’t realize it at the time, or at least realize the extent, but Dawkins was a marketing marvel ahead of his time. What a gregarious personality, what a gift of being able to connect with people, what a wit, all wrapped up in a mountain of a body that helped him stand out in other ways. Not only shattering backboards, but then labeling the dunk with a lengthy rhyme? The same guy now would break Twitter. He was Chocolate Thunder and he was from Lovetron. We were all better for it that alter ego Darryl Dawkins visited Earth and the NBA.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I’m thinking this is a trick question, because “shattered glass” is the first thing that comes to mind. I’ll give you the second and third: That square-off with Maurice Lucas during the NBA Finals; Luke would’ve dropped him had they gone the limit (RIP to Luke, by the way). And those colorful suits he wore, which were louder than an AC/DC concert.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: When I was 9 or 10 years old (mid 80s), a basketball camp I was at got a visit from the biggest guy I had ever seen in my life. Darryl Dawkins was the first NBA player I ever met and the first autograph I ever got. He told some funny stories, threw down a few dunks, and signed for everybody there. Thirty years later, he had the same personality and the same willingness to engage with fans, young and old. For someone from the planet Lovetron, he was very down to earth.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com:  First and foremost, Darryl Dawkins was a larger than life personality light years ahead of his time. We love to talk about players who could transcend the time they played in and whether or not they could be as effective in another era. I think about him off the court, “Chocolate Thunder” in the social media age … we’d all be in stitches around the clock. That said, the one thing that I’ll remember most is seeing him during All-Star Weekends and other functions when he was around the other living legends of the game and seeing what kind of love they still have for a guy who was a fierce competitor and as big a personality as there was during all of their playing days. Plus, the man gave us a 10th planet, “Lovetron,” something no one will ever be able to top in terms of the greatest marketing creation any athlete has ever cooked up.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comI remember interviewing him in his hotel room in Istanbul at the 1992 Euroleague Final Four. At that time Dawkins, 35, had been out of the NBA for three years. He was playing for Milan and coach Mike D’Antoni, who called him “the best player in Europe’’ and the fastest on his team. Dawkins was shooting better than 80% from the field in the Italian league because he was consistently passing up any shot that wasn’t two feet from the basket. “All he does is dunk,” D’Antoni said. In the Italian boxscores he was listed as Dawkins, Darryl Ricardo. “That was my mother did that to me,” he said of his middle name. “That was from her watching ‘I Love Lucy’ reruns all those years.” He was a character even then.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Dawkins was in that last generation of players that was before my time, so by the time I was avidly watching NBA games, Dawkins was finishing his NBA career out battling injuries playing for the Nets and Pistons. To me, more than anything, Dawkins was like some kind of myth. He broke not one, but *two* backboards? How was that even possible? And this was in an era before YouTube, so seeing a replay of one of Dawkins’ glass-shatterers was like stumbling across found footage of a long-rumored treasure. I know it’s much more difficult now with breakaway rims, but I still think someone breaking a backboard during the dunk contest on All-Star Weekend would be an instant contest-winner, and it’s still the one thing that nobody has pulled off in a dunk contest. Perhaps this year someone can figure out how to do it as a tribute to Chocolate Thunder.

5 Comments

  1. Slang says:

    I’ll never forget WrestleMania 2, when he was a guest judge for the Piper / Mr. T match. He looked like he could put in a few moves himself. RIP, and thanks for mentoring Derozan that one time with the All Star Slam Dunk competition.

  2. marlon green says:

    I will never forget those shattered backboards and that one of a kind personality he had. His famous “Yo Momma” dunk. Seriously who names their dunks!? The guy was just as much fun to watch off the court as he was on it. RIP Chocolate Thunder and prayers go out to you and your family.

  3. harriethehawk says:

    I never got to see him play live, but I saw him every day for the fours years I spent in college- kept his large poster up in my college dorm back in the early 80’s. Loved that guy.

  4. The Angry Buddhist says:

    I’m surprised that none of these pundits wrote about how Darryl was persecuted by the officials. 1976 was only a few years after the age of Black Power. Dawkins was the first super athlete in the NBA (save for Wilt) and with his deep blackness, ear rings and ferocious power he was a threat to the order of things, Whether it was conscious or sub-conscious it doesn’t matter. Three times he led the league in personal fouls. The refs took away his game. He had more talent than Shaq. He was just a generation too soon.
    Once I was court-side at the Meadowlands and Darryl went flying into the stands a seat away from me. Talk about UFOs. RIP big guy.

  5. Roger Tornga says:

    I lived in Seattle when Philly played Portland for the championship and will never forget the rare privilege of seeing Chocolate Thunder and Dr. J play Maurice Lucas and Bill Walton etal. Drove to Portland and slept on the sidewalk the night before and got tickets to be one of the 12,666 at the Rose Garden. So much fun and DD was a BIIG part of it.