Film Study: Spurs get good looks inside


VIDEO: Nightly Notable: Tim Duncan, Game 1, NBA Finals

SAN ANTONIO – The San Antonio Spurs suddenly have turned into the Houston Rockets.

Through their first 17 playoff games, the Spurs took 30 percent of their shots from mid-range (between the paint and the 3-point line), the most inefficient area of the floor. That rate is higher than the league average (27 percent) for the postseason.

But in their last two games (Game 6 of the conference finals in Oklahoma City and Game 1 of The Finals on Thursday), the Spurs have attempted just 12 percent (19/162) of their shots from mid-range, a rate that’s very Rockets-like. Since Game 2 of the Oklahoma City series, the Spurs have attempted 27 3-pointers per game. And on Thursday, they shot 13-for-25 from beyond the arc. They also shot 24-for-35 (69 percent) in the paint, their second-best percentage of the postseason.

All 10 of Tim Duncan‘s shots were from inside the paint. He made nine of them to lead the Spurs with 21 points. Tiago Splitter shot 5-for-6 in the paint. When their teammates were able to get them the ball, the bigs were able to finish.

“It’s where my shots come,”  Duncan said Friday. “We have a lot of shooters and I’m not going to stretch the court in that respect. Every once in a while I get a jumpshot from 15 to 18 feet, but mostly my effective range is in there right now. I’m going to pick‑and‑roll and try to get to open spots and try to take advantage of the rotation if they’re trapping.”

The Spurs committed 22 turnovers in Game 1, 14 of the live-ball variety. The Heat’s rotations were on point most of the night, but the Spurs were also very sloppy, failing to connect on some simple passes. But they executed well enough to score 110 points on 95 possessions. And much of that execution resulted in layups for their big men.

Pick, roll, and finish

Duncan’s final basket of the game, one that gave the Spurs the lead for good, was a simple pick-and-roll with Manu Ginobili on the left sideline. Chris Andersen stepped out to contain Ginobili, and Dwyane Wade gave him just enough space to deliver a pocket pass to the rolling Duncan…

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And when Duncan made the catch, the only person between him and the basket was little Ray Allen. When a team is faced with this …

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… the Spurs either have a layup or a wide-open Danny Green in the corner. Duncan chose the layup.

Four of Splitter’s five layups were pick-and-rolls, with him scoring over a smaller Miami help defender. San Antonio is smart, putting a guard in the weak side corner, so that it’s his man – a Miami guard – who’s rotating over to help on the roll man. That makes it easier for the Spurs’ big to finish over top.

“That’s by design,” Shane Battier said Friday. “We know it. And if we’re sharp in our rotations and meet the roller early, it can mitigate some of that.”

Drag, swing and drive

Layups don’t necessarily come one pass after the pick-and-roll. And the Spurs are the best team in the league at keeping the ball moving until the open shot can be found.

Duncan’s first basket of the second quarter was a result of a drag screen from Boris Diaw, which Tony Parker used to pull Rashard Lewis out to the sideline and give him a long distance to recover back to Diaw…

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Diaw drove past Lewis’ close-out, drew Chris Bosh‘s attention, and fed Duncan under the basket.

Pick-and-seal

Duncan’s second bucket of the game was a result of a pick-and-roll, but wasn’t him scoring over a guard. Instead, it was him refusing to let Bosh get back into position.

Bosh came out high on a Parker/Duncan pick-and-roll out of the corner…

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When Bosh recovered, Duncan got his body between his defender and the basket and pushed Bosh out to the foul line. The Big Fundamental executed a perfect seal.

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It was just a matter of getting him the ball. Green’s pass allowed Bosh to get back between Duncan and the basket, but Duncan still had good enough position to get a good look.

Around the front

The smaller Heat mostly front the low post, forcing their opponent to make difficult passes. This scheme works very well against the bigger Pacers, because the Pacers are bad passers.

But the Spurs have guys that can find the right angle on entry passes. One of those guys is Ginobili.

Here, Duncan got a cross-screen from Kawhi Leonard, but Lewis was still able to beat him to the block.

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A more timid passer would swing the ball to the other side. Ginobili found the proper angle…

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… and thread the needle for a Duncan layup. Duncan got another on a similar play late in the second quarter.

He’s good. Know where he is.

A couple of Duncan layups where just a result of a lack of recognition from Bosh. The Spurs’ first basket of the game came when Bosh had his head turned after getting back in transition. And another in the third quarter came when Bosh was on the weak side block and was astoundingly slow in recognizing Duncan’s cut to the basket.

The Heat defense certainly could be better. They need to be more aware, they need to pressure the ball to make those passes more difficult, and their help defenders need to meet the roll man farther from the basket.

“It starts with ball pressure,” Battier said. “I thought they had a lot of straight-line passes into the paint, which is really death for us. If you put two on the ball, you have to affect the tempo and the timing of the pass. We didn’t do that well enough. And B, we have to trust the rotator.”

“We have to do some things better, more committed, five‑man against a very good passing team,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra added. “They’re well schooled. Some things that we need to adjust on. That’s what we’ll figure out in the next couple of days.”

The Spurs’ could certainly execute better, too. Their offense was a feast-or-famine situation in Game 1. And they won, because the fourth quarter, when they shot 14-for-16 (6-for-6 from 3-point range), was mostly feast. They may not shoot as well in Game 2 on Sunday (8 p.m. ET, ABC), but they can certainly cut down on the turnovers and keep Miami from easy baskets on the other end of the floor.

9 Comments

  1. ricz says:

    Miami Heat can’t handle the heat
    Oh well game 2 should be really interesting

    SAS can win if they don’t turn the ball over 15 and up

  2. SPURS GREATNESS says:

    3-peat??

    More like DE-FEAT.

    he he

  3. SPURS GREATNESS says:

    HA HA HA … Miami will win the series in 6 games ?? Really ??

    WHHHHHAAAAATTTTTTTT ??!!! HOW ???

    The SPURS have Home Court Advantage.
    We only need 3 more wins.
    We have a talented & deeper bench.
    We play at a faster pace.
    Miami has no solid defense against DUNCAN & TIAGO inside the painted area.
    Lebron’s conditioning is questionable after his cramping in game one.
    GINOBILI is healthy and playing well. GREEN makes his threes. DIAW is making plays.

    So please, please… explain just HOW the HEAT can miraculously win this year’s championship …

  4. Game Time says:

    Some fans are making excuses for the game. Others are dealing with it, but the critics are all jumping on LeBron like he did something wrong. They guy is the most athletic person out that and as such his body requires more when it comes to liquids or whatever. There was no way for him to prevent what happened other than limiting his aggressiveness on the court. That being, no credit should be taken away from the Spurs for the win. I think next game Miami will take and this will end in six for a 3peat.

  5. JumpmasterZ says:

    lebron wasnt the only one in the Heat. All the players where in the building, feeling the effects.

  6. Max says:

    John, call a spade, a spade. What was the score in SAS when the Heat’s LeBron stared locking down with the cramps brought on by no N/C. Very dangerous, Owners should have stopped game and played the last 3 qtrs. tonight. Just like in Baseball, raining, game is stopped and continued next day. Any of those players could have had a Heat Stroke last night in SAS. The first game of the playoffs, went South after the Heat Player’s, could not deal with the Hot gym, and #6 just could not play anymore, so at that point the game was over for the Heat. Check the score when LeBron first started asking to come out of the game, until that point the game had been goal about, witch either team could have won. Just could have been Duncan, Parker. Maybe the fans were right, the Spurs are use to more Hot, Hot conditions in witch to play. Game 2 will show more about the winners of each team. Have to forget game one, it had nothing to do with a Team’s ability, but NO A/C????Dangerous!

    • Jeremy says:

      I thought the problem was the sleeves on LeBron’s jersey? Or was it the face mask? Sorry, that was the last time the Spurs whooped Miami.

      But you are right, I’m sure the Spurs train all the time in hot conditions, especially with Miami being so close to the polar ice cap and all.

    • William says:

      Lebron is the best player on earth*

      *optimal conditions required.

    • Larry says:

      miami its hot too..