Blogtable: Grading Phil’s debut

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the three most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: The rest of the East | The MVP of the Clippers | Phil Jackson’s debut



VIDEO: Phil Jackson, new president of the Knicks, lays out some reasons he came back to the game

> You saw Phil Jackson’s return: What was your takeaway? Any questions?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: His comments about Carmelo Anthony sounded like recruiting pitches (though I’ve always thought ‘Melo was going to stay right where he is). Now he can stick around for the maximum money while claiming it’s a mission to win. The delusions of grandeur that have been part of his problem in the past will be stoked anew by Jackson’s praise and pledge to help him reach his “next level.” Anthony – who has had a hard enough time realizing he isn’t LeBron James or Kevin Durant – now will think of himself as Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant, the all-timers who needed Jackson to get their rings. Please.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Biggest takeaway is that Phil Jackson’s first day on the job will be the easiest day he has. Standing behind that microphone was like a politician making promises. Changing the short-term fix culture of the Knicks will be the heavy lifting. Can he get ownership, Carmelo Anthony and, just as important, the New York media to buy into a seismic shift? If he can do that, Jackson doesn’t just have the Knicks on a steady course by 2016, he’s perfectly timed that same year to run for President.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: The stuff about seeing Carmelo Anthony with the Knicks and living in New York, and that was great. Bigger than any one particular thing Phil Jackson said was simply the credibility, the rock of stability, he put on display by acting like the man in charge. New Yorkers should rejoice, James Dolan‘s paranoia and utter lack of interpersonal skills are being pushed to the side and overshadowed by a very tall and wise Zen Master, a true master in the art of communication. This is big.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comThere was no big takeaway. If anyone had a chance to make one, in what is ordinarily a very scripted setting, it would be Jackson, but even he kept it simple and straightforward. He is excited, the Knicks can have a big future, it’s a special organization. Yada yada yada. James Dolan had a good one, though. Gratefully giving up the power. Funny stuff. As for whether there is anything else I need to know: You mean besides everything? This only becomes real once a man with no front-office experience starts making moves, and that can’t happen at a press conference.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I liked that he brought up continuity, which is something that has been missing in New York, with all the different general managers, coaches and high-priced players that have come through over the last 12 years. Keeping a core together for several years is more difficult under this CBA, but just having a team president and coach who are on the same page for four or five straight years would be a big step in the right direction.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I watched every second of Phil’s first media rodeo as president of the Knicks and it was exactly what I was expecting, the (Zen) master taking over the room from the start. He disarmed the assembled media, let James Dolan off the hook (“we’re here to take the pressure of making basketball decisions off of his plate” … I’m paraphrasing) and then stuck him with it later (“I wouldn’t be here if we hadn’t established that I do this my way” … again, paraphrasing), smiling the entire time. He wants to work with Carmelo Anthony and does not appear to have any plans to do the same with Mike Woodson beyond this season. And yet the biggest takeaway from the entire affair for me was his declaration that he will indeed be a hands-on manager of the basketball operation in New York and engage himself in the process in every way. He is NOT going to coach this team. I don’t know how many different ways he can say it. But that was also the one other major item I took away from his maiden effort as the public face of the franchise. It’s Front Office Phil’s show from here on out, for better or worse. The Knicks and certainly the league become much more interesting with Phil Jackson in an active role.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com All Ball blog: If you don’t trust Phil Jackson by now, I’m not sure there’s anything I can do to help you. I think the thing I took away from the press conference wasn’t anything Phil said, but moreso that Knicks owner Jim Dolan seemed as enamored of Phil as he is The Eagles. Dolan appeared to be willing to fully hand over basketball ops to Phil and get out of his way, which for Knicks fans must be an encouraging thing to have heard. Phil has a huge task at hand — not sure if he can create draft picks out of thin air, for instance — but either way, having Phil in charge should buy the Knicks a few more years to find their footing and get some sort of traction regarding the future.

Karan Madhok, NBA India: The biggest takeaway at Phil’s introductory speech was the beacon call to the good ol’ days of basketball in the mecca, the late 60s and early 70s when the Knicks played the most team-oriented brand of basketball ever and won their only two championships. Jackson was part of that team, and he wants to bring the same philosophy to the franchise more than 40 years later. He spoke about bringing a system of ball-movement and unselfishness. But the big question is: how? The Knicks don’t have much room to upgrade this roster, so the change will have to come from the within – a Zen-like philosophical adjustment – than from the outside.

Iñako Díaz-Guerra, NBA España: I love Phil Jackson. I think that he’s one of the greatest minds of sports history, but … I listen to all his great words and can’t stop thinking: “Great, but how are you going to make that happen? Black magic?” Look, I love the Knicks and I love Phil Jackson, but the contracts of Amar’e, Bargnani and J.R. Smith aren’t going to disappear. Will Jackson have the patience for at least one more year of losing? That’s my doubt.


VIDEO: Jackson offers his thoughts on Carmelo Anthony and running the triangle offense

5 Comments

  1. okc2014 says:

    I think Phil Jackson is “talking” like he is all for Carmello Anthony, but is strongly anticipating his leaving the Knicks. This guy is very intelligent and best believe, he has a plan A, B and C. I think they will do better in the long run, without him, and focus on rebuilding, like the Celtics. Carmello wants to win a championship, like yesterday.

  2. kkk says:

    Even tho the knicks are loosing, this is one of the best seasons carmelo has ever had, every win the knicks have this year have been because of carmelo. he is scoring like a machine, rebounding, and I agree with what chris weber said on nba tv. he is playing great defense.

    It will be though to resign melo, because next year doesnt look good for the knicks, even tho JR and amare has been playing well of late.

  3. Desmodeus says:

    I think it’s a little odd to be wondering if Phil Jackson will be able to handle another year of losing. I’m pretty sure he was aware of the Knicks situation with regard to the contracts of Amare and co before he agreed to take the job. I don’t think anyone with any understanding of basketball would think the Knicks are going to be able to turn this around overnight. So if he wasn’t up for “at least one more year of losing” I don’t imagine he would have taken the job.

  4. Simba says:

    Wow, Steve Aschburner really needs to let whatever he has against Melo go. Every time he’s asked to make a comment about Carmelo Anthony he, in uncertain terms, voices his dislike of Melo’s game and personality. At this point Steve, “see last Melo comment” should suffice as a response.

  5. New Yorker says:

    Not much can be done while Studamire is under contract… sadly.