Payroll Not A Taxing Problem For Nets

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ORLANDO, Fla — There were many different things that could have stood in the way of the Nets making the blockbuster moves to trade for Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Jason Terry.

Money wasn’t going to be one of them. While so many teams are desperately running away from paying the luxury tax next season, the Nets practically sprinted into taking a financial bath, raising their potential tax bill from just under $13 million last season to almost $80 million for 2013-14.

“I think it’s great for our fans and for our organization that we have an owner (Mikhail Prokorhov) who is willing to spend the money and spend it wisely,” said general manager Billy King while waiting for the start of play Wednesday at the Orlando Pro Summer League.

“We didn’t just spend the money to spend it, we feel like we’ve advanced our common goal to win a championship. (Prokohov) believes in what we’re doing, we talk about it and map it out going forward as far as our strategy for the next couple of years and what we want to get to for the next couple of years.

“When we did this deal we mapped it out … We have a couple of year window to do what we’ve set out to accomplish and then we can reevaluate it. I think the way the contracts are set up now you have a chance to set it up for three or four years, with the length of contract, to reshuffle very quickly.”

The Nets were scrambling after they found that Turkish forward Bojan Bogdanovic will not be be joining the team. No agreement could be made on a buyout with his team in Turkey. King said there was another option available, though free agent Andrei Kirilenko’s price would definitely be out of the Nets range.

“I wanted him in Brooklyn, there was no about about that,” said coach Jason Kidd. “But now we go to Plan B and move on.”

A year ago, on the eve of their relocation to Brooklyn, the Nets thought they were also making a big move up into the level of playoff contenders when they committed big money to re-sign free agent Deron Williams and then traded for the expensive contract of Joe Johnson. But they were still knocked out of the playoffs in the first round by an injury-depleted Bulls team.

The increasingly punitive luxury tax provisions of the new collective bargaining agreement kick in this season and even such perennial heavy hitters as the Lakers have pulled back on spending due to the repeater clauses that will kick in down the line.

“It’s not a goal of mine to hit the repeater tax, but that’s not the main concern,” King said.

Prokorhov has let it be known that his only goal is winning a championship with both his words and opening of his wallet. Thus, Garnett, Pierce and Terry, all veterans with championship experience.

“I think with our roster and the guys we have it’s not about scoring titles, it’s about winning,” King said. “That’s the great thing when you have guys leading and thinking that way it makes it easy for you to win. When you have guys worried about getting their shots then the common goal of winning is not the most important thing.”

10 Comments

  1. Max says:

    Is Kidd the coach or d . Williams? For Brooklyn nets. Time. Will again tell’! 3rd coach? D,Williams. Needs to play with d. HowArd. & cousins’. ‘

    !

  2. Trey says:

    That’s actually a good point it shouldn’t b a limit in what an owner can spend. On 2nd thought it’s actually good that way u won’t just have 6 or 7 good teams n the entire league I’m sure if they there was no cap We would have plenty of superstars on just a handful of teams. I would set the salary at about 80-85Million if I was commish

  3. AJC says:

    More owners should take the approach that the fans and winning comes first, then the tax. “If you build it, they will come”, if you put together a contender, the seats will be filled and the fans will be happy and profits will come in. If you shy away, and build a cut rate team, then the seats will be empty and the purpose will be defeated. I think the tax is a poor way to discourage owners from spending. There should be another way, such as forfeiting draft picks, and the picks go into a lottery for teams who stay under the cap.

  4. jaoromero says:

    spending without any care is all well and good, but leaving Billy King in charge of the spending is just foolish. just because the bank has been opened does not mean you have license to spend stupidly. apparently, Billy King does not realize this.

    you’ve been given one of the rarets gifts a GM can get. the least you can do is get it right.

  5. jaoromero says:

    spending without any care is all well and good, but leaving Billy King in charge of the spending is just foolish. just because the bank has been opened does not mean you have license to spend stupidly. apparently, Billy King does not realize this.

    you’ve been given one of the rarets gifts a GM can get. the least you can do is get it right.

  6. Andylx says:

    Pocket change to one of the Mikhail Prokhorov. He worth 13 billion dollars.

  7. ehehrh says:

    theyre not gonna win with their old guys and a rookie coach, but they will get much more experience and as you said culture and good work ethic from pierce and garnett.

  8. burk says:

    Brooklyns’ got one hell of a starting five. It’s like watching an all star game every night.
    Garnett and pierce still got 2 more years left in them to be dominant in the leauge.
    No question about adjusting in the new system as they already proved long ago when the Big 3 in Boston was formed.
    Expensive but perfect acquisitions by the Nets.
    Prediction will be a conference finals appearance the least.

  9. KOBE'S_A_BALLHOGGER says:

    HOW DO Y’ALL LIKE MY NAME

  10. grantstern says:

    The Nets will have a very expensive exit from the 2nd or possibly 3rd round of the playoffs for a couple of years with this overpriced team of aging stars. However, they’re buying something else that is more important: culture. They’re getting players who come from a culture of winning, who should establish Brooklyn’s franchise with a competitive elan from day 1. That’s worth the money.